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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 47: the March up the Valley. (search)
New Market, and orders were sent for it to return to the Luray Valley, and join me at Port Republic. In the meantime, Payne's small brigade had been driven from Millford by two divisions of cavalry under Torbert, which had moved up the Luray Valley, and subsequently joined Sheridan through the New Market Gap. This cavalry had been detained by Wickham with his and Payne's brigades, at Millford, a sufficient time to enable us to pass New Market in safety. If, however, it had moved up the Luray Valley by Conrad's store, we would have been in a critical condition. On the morning of the 25th, we moved towards Port Republic,--which is in the fork of the Ste Edinburg, but a part of the enemy's cavalry swept along the Pike to Mount Jackson, and then retired on the approach of a part of my infantry. On the 10th, Rosser established his line of pickets across the Valley from Columbia Furnace to Edinburg, and on the 11th Lomax was sent to the Luray Valley to take position at Millford.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 48: battle of Cedar Creek, or Belle Grove. (search)
at New Market, about seven miles from Mount Jackson, and there was an entirely open country between the two places, they being very nearly in sight of each other. Lomax had moved, on the day of the battle, on the Front Royal road towards Winchester, under the impression that the enemy was being forced back towards that place, and he did not reach me. When he ascertained the reverse which had taken place in the latter part of the day, he retired up the Luray Valley to his former place at Millford, without molestation. My loss in the battle of Cedar Creek was twenty-three pieces of artillery, some ordnance and medical wagons and ambulances, which had been carried to the front for the use of the troops on the field, about 1860 in killed and wounded, and something over 1,000 prisoners. Major General Ramseur fell into the hands of the enemy mortally wounded, and in him not only my command, but the country sustained a heavy loss. He was a most gallant and energetic officer, whom no
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 49: close of the Valley campaign. (search)
Chapter 49: close of the Valley campaign. After the return from Cedar Creek, the main body of my troops remained in their camp for the rest of the month without disturbance, but on the 26th of October the enemy's cavalry attacked Lomax at Millford and after sharp fighting was repulsed. Having heard that Sheridan was preparing to send troops to Grant, and that the Manassas Gap Railroad was being repaired, I moved down the Valley again on the 10th of November. I had received no reinforcements except about 250 cavalry under General Cosby from Breckenridge's department in Southwestern Virginia, some returned convalescents and several hundred conscripts who had been on details which had been revoked. On the 11th, on our approach to Cedar Creek, it was found that the enemy had fallen back towards Winchester, after having fortified and occupied a position on Hupp's Hill subsequently to the battle of Cedar Creek. Colonel Payne drove a small body of cavalry through Middletown to New
many deep potations with the new-comers who daily thronged about the Buckhorn had interfered with the execution of his plans, and the boat still remained in the womb of the future. Offut met the three expectant navigators on their arrival, and deep were his regrets over his failure to provide the boat. The interview resulted in the trio engaging to make the boat themselves. From what was known as Congress land they obtained an abundance of timber, and by the aid of the machinery at Kirkpatrick's mill they soon had the requisite material for their vessel. While the work of construction was going on a shanty was built in which they were lodged. Lincoln was elected cook, a distinction he never underestimated for a moment. Within four weeks the boat was ready to launch. Offut was sent for, and was present when she slid into the water. It was the occasion of much political chat and buncombe, in which the Whig party and Jackson alike were, strangely enough, lauded to the skies. It
by the Emperor to the European Powers, declaring that the arrest of Mason and Slidell is contrary to principles regarded as essential to the security of neutral flags, and stating that the French Government deemed it necessary to submit this opinion to the Cabinet at Washington, in order to determine it to make concessions which the French Government deemed indispensable. A detachment of Gen. Pope's forces, under command of Col. J. C. Davis and Major Marshall, surprised a rebel camp at Millford, a little north of Warrensburgh, Mo., this afternoon, and, surrounding the enemy, forced them to surrender. Thirteen hundred prisoners, including three colonels, seventeen captains, one thousand stand of arms, one thousand horses, sixty-five wagons, and a large quantity of tents, baggage, and supplies Were captured. The Nationals lost two killed and eight wounded.--(Doc. 231.) A reconnoitring expedition, under command of Commander Drayton, U. S. N., left Port Royal, S. C., on the 16t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 10.78 (search)
ch captured two important posts, with over 1000 prisoners and several pieces of artillery, in the limits of Sheridan's command? Yet such was the case. J. A. E. Lomax had moved on the day of the battle, on the Front Royal road toward Winchester, under the impression that the enemy was being forced back toward that place, and he did not reach me. When he ascertained the reverse which had taken place in the latter part of the day, he retired up the Luray Valley to his former position at Millford, without molestation. My loss in the battle of Cedar Creek was twenty-three pieces of artillery, some ordnance and medical wagons and ambulances, which had been carried to the front for the use of the troops on the field; about 1860 in killed and wounded, and something over 1000 prisoners. Sheridan's loss in this battle was 644 killed, 3430 wounded, 1591 captured or missing,--aggregate, 5665. Early's was about 3000.--editors. Major-General Ramseur fell into the hands of the enemy mo
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
Hayes; Philadelphia, Silas Reynolds; pioneer, C. S. Baker; picket, T. P. Ives; rocket, James Lake; Ranger, J. B. Childs; Stars and Stripes, Reed Werden; Southfield, Behm; Shawsheen, T. S. Wood-ward; shrapnel, Ed. Staples; Underwriter, Jeffers; Valley City, J. C. Chaplin; Vidette,---------; White-head, French; young Rover, I. B. Studley. every thing necessary for the peculiar service assigned to the expedition was furnished and arranged. The fleet guns were equipped with ship and field carriagehe battle had lasted only forty minutes, and Rowan's loss was only two killed and five or six wounded. an extraordinary example of heroism was exhibited during this engagement by John Davis, a Finlander, who was a gunner's mate on board the Valley City. a shell entered that vessel, and, exploding in the magazine, set fire to some wood-work. Davis was there, and, seeing the imminent danger to the vessel and all on board, because of an open barrel of gunpowder from which he had been serving,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
,212 16 446 92 1,765 24 do Jan. 4, 1864 Stars and Stripes, Louisiaua, Hetzel, Delaware, Commodore Perry, Philadelphia, Valley City, Underwriter, Commodore Barney, Southfield, Morse, Hunchback, Lockwood.   Cotton, 30 bales 6,276 05 859 25 5,416 80ouisiana, Hetzel, Under writer, Morse, Commodore Perry, Southfield, H. Brincker, Delaware, Lockwood, Commodore Barney, Valley City, Hunchback, Philadelphia.   Cargo of 4 canoes Waiting for prize list of the Currituck. 575 00 301 40 273 60 Wash00 staves 62,179 36 13,680 90 48,498 46 New York Dec. 31, 1863 Stars and Stripes, Louisiana, Hetzel, Commodore Barney, Valley City, Underwriter, Commodore Perry, Southfield, Hunohback, Philadelphia, Morse, H. Brincker, Lockwood, Delaware, George ManVirginia 3,050 00 1,007 47 2,042 53 do Jan. 27, 1864 Stars and Stripes, Delaware, Louisiana, Commodore Perry. Hetzel, Valley City, Underwriter, Hunchback, Commodore Barney, Philadelphia, Southfield, Morse, H. Brincker, Lockwood. Steamer Caroline
good order. General Ewell directed me to cover the retiring of the troops with my brigade. Lawton's brigade was first withdrawn across the ford at the railroad bridge, and then Hays's brigade followed, the regiments engaged in front having fallen back in good order. My own brigade was withdrawn from the pine woods in which it was, and formed in successive lines of battle so as to cover the ford at the bridge. All of the artillery was successfully crossed over, a part having crossed at Millford, several hundred yards above the bridge, at which also the Forty-ninth Virginia regiment crossed. In the mean time, the enemy advanced in line of battle on both sides of the railroad, preceded by skirmishers, and keeping up a constant artillery fire. Lawton's brigade was formed in line of battle on the north bank of Broad Run, and some batteries were placed in position, and Hays's brigade was ordered to proceed to Manassas. After all the other brigades and the artillery had crossed, my
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
sland, N. C. Union, 21st, 23d, 24th, 25th and 27th Mass., 10th Conn., 9th, 51st, and 53d N. Y., 9th N. J., 51st Pa., 4th and 5th R. I., U. S. Gunboats Southfield, Delaware, Stars and Stripes, Louisiana, Hetzel, Commodore Perry, Underwriter, Valley City, Commodore Barney, Hunchback, Ceres, Putnam, Morse, Lockwood, Seymour, Granite, Brinker, Whitehead, Shawseen, Pickett, Pioneer, Hussar, Vidette, Chasseur. Confed., 2d, 7th, 8th, 17th, 19th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 31st, 33d, 35th, 37th, 46th, 59t. Losses: Union 35 killed, 200 wounded. Confed. 16 killed, 39 wounded, 2,527 taken prisoners. February 10, 1862: Elizabeth City, or Cobb's Point, N. C. Union, Gunboats Delaware, Underwriter, Louisiana, Seymour, Hetzel, Shawseen, Valley City, Putnam, Commodore Perry, Ceres, Morse, Whitehead, and Brinker. Confed., Mosquito fleet commanded by Commodore W. F. Lynch, and comprising the vessels engaged at Roanoke Island on the 8th, except the Curlew. Losses: Union 3 killed.
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