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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
eport is to the same effect. In a calm review of the battle, not unfriendly to General Grant, and written some years after the occurrence, General Hurlbut said: About 6 P. M. this movement (for a final attack at the landing) was reported to General Hurlbut. He at once took measures to change the front of 2 regiments, or parts of regiments, of which the 55th Illinois was one, and to turn 6 pieces of artillery to bear upon the point of danger. At that instant, he being near the head of the Landing road, General Grant came up from the river, closely followed by Ammen's brigade of Nelson's division. Information of the expected attack was promptly given, and two of Ammen's regiments deployed into line, moved rapidly forward, and after a few sharp exchanges of volleys from them, the enemy fell back, and the bloody series of engagements of Sunday at Pittsburg Landing closed with that last repulse. The reports of all the officers who took part in the action at the landing, Nelson, Amme
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
ard of the causeway, on which lies the railway track from the main at Morehead City to the wharf at deep water. Morehead City is seen in the distance, and Bogue Sound and Spit appear on the left, where the vessels are seen. The single bird indicates the place of Morehead City; the two birds, the site of a fort erected by the Nationals; the three birds, the wooded point at Carolina City from which ordnance and supplies were sent over to the Spit; and the four birds show the position of the Landing-place on the Spit from which the siege-guns were taken to their proper places. The picture is from a sketch made by the writer from the deck of the Ben Deford, in December, 1864. were co-operating with them, and the garrison, composed of about five hundred North Carolinians, was cut off from all communication by sea and land. Two of the companies in the fort were young men from Beaufort, and there, in sight of their homes, they were really prisoners. They resorted to various devices t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
The name may be found in the poems of Ossian. We left Selma toward evening, and at sunset our vessel was moored a few minutes at Cahawba, to land a passenger whose name has been mentioned, as the entertainer of Wilson and Forrest. See page 518. Our voyage to Mobile did not end until the morning of the third day, when we had traveled, from Montgomery, nearly four hundred miles. In that fine City of the Gulf we spent sufficient time to make brief visits to places of most Ruins at the Landing place, Selma. historic interest, within and around it. Its suburbs were very beautiful before they were scarred by the implements of war; but the hand of nature was rapidly covering up the foot-prints of the destroyer. Although it had been only a year since the lines of fortifications were occupied by troops, the embankments were covered with verdure and the fort or redoubt, delineated on page 507, was white with the blossoms of the blackberry shrub, when the writer sketched it. It was