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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
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s, eighteen miles from Fort Fillmore, had been released on parole, the Texans retaining their arms and the horses belonging to the Mounted Rifles. Gen. Wm. Pelham, formerly Surveyor-General of New Mexico, and Col. Clements, were arrested at Santa Fe, and confined in the guard-house, by order of Col. Canby, of the Department of New Mexico. They were suspected of giving improper information to the Texas troops of Fort Bliss, below El Paso. Col. Clements took the oath of allegiance, and was discharged. Gen. Pelham refused to take the oath, and is still confined in the guard-house. Col. Canby, by proclamation, had suspended the writ of habeas corpus in New Mexico. Fort Stanton had been abandoned by the United States forces, and the fort afterward fired by order of Col. Canby.--National Intelligencer, September 2. At Middletown, New Jersey, a party of peace men attempted to hold a meeting, but were prevented by the presence of a large body of Unionists.--N. Y. Herald, August 30.
ps, in order to enable the traitors to hold the territory, and apprehends an attack by way of Southern California, and by the regular troops still quartered in the New Mexican department, now on the borders of Arizona. Three regiments of these troops are in New Mexico, and it is supposed they could be largely increased from the floating population of the neighboring territory of Colorado. The Times demands the extermination of the whole Indian race. It boasts that, by the abandonment of Fort Stanton by the United States troops, on the 8th of August, property equal to three hundred thousand dollars has fallen into the hands of the traitors, including the fort, and adds that not a single Federal soldier is now left on the soil of Arizona. In consequence of the secession of the Cherokee nation, and its alliance with the rebels, Colonel McNeil, Assistant Provost-Marshal at St. Louis, Mo., issued a proclamation notifying the St. Louis Building and Savings Association that the sum of
December 27. Intelligence was received at Washington that Col. Canby, in command of the military department of New Mexico, had retaken Forts Craig and Stanton, on the Masilla border, driving the Texans away, and was on the way to Fort Fillmore to dispossess the rebels at that post, which was traitorously surrendered by Colonel Lynde to an inferior force of Texans. Thence he intended marching into Arizona to drive off the rebels.--The Legislature of New Mexico met on the 2d of December. Governor Connelly, in his message, recommended active measures with reference to the Indians who had been tampered with by Albert Pike, suggesting that they be located on the reservations, and encouraged in agricultural pursuits. The Indians, for the greater part, were peaceable and friendly to the United States Government.--Philadelphia Press, Dec. 28. The burning of buildings near New Market Bridge, Va., by order of Brigadier-General Mansfield, called forth the following order from Gener
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate invasion of New Mexico and Arizona. (search)
n the town, involving a loss, of three men killed and two officers and four men wounded, he cowardly returned to the adobe walls of Fort Fillmore. On the morning of the 27th Lynde evacuated the fort without reason, and commenced a retreat for Fort Stanton, having about five hundred men. When near San Augustine Springs, Baylor appeared in his rear with less than three hundred men; and without a shot on either side Lynde surrendered his entire force, which consisted of seven companies of the 7th rt of the Territory of New Mexico lying south of the thirty-fourth parallel of north latitude as the Confederate territory of Arizona, the seat of government being at Mesilla, and the authority of governor being assumed by himself. August 2d, Fort Stanton, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Benjamin S. Roberts, 3d U. S. Cavalry, was abandoned, all the public stores that could not be carried away being destroyed. During the month of September Baylor sent several small parties northerly tow
iment, Fort Slocum. That on Prospect Hill, near Bladensburg, Fort Lincoln. That next on the left of Fort Lincoln, Fort Saratoga. That next on the left of Fort Saratoga, Fort Bunker Hill. That on the right of General Sickles's camp, Fort Stanton. That on the right of Fort Stanton, Fort Carroll. That on the left towards Bladensburg, Fort Greble. By command of Major-General McClellan. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant-General. Richard B. Irwin, Aide-de-Camp. Depredations of FeFort Stanton, Fort Carroll. That on the left towards Bladensburg, Fort Greble. By command of Major-General McClellan. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant-General. Richard B. Irwin, Aide-de-Camp. Depredations of Federal soldiers punishable by death. The following order was also issued by General McClellan: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Washington, October 1, 1861. General Order No. 19. The attention of the General commanding has recently been directed to depredations of an atrocious character that have been committed upon the persons and property of citizens in Virginia, by the troops under his command. The property of inoffensive people has been lawlessly and violently taken from them, t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Mexico, (search)
Arizona declared a fraud by the United States court of private land claims and Reavis sentenced to pay a fine of $10,000 and serve two years in prison......June 25, 1895 Silver City suffers disastrous flood......July 23, 1895 San Juan county apple crop estimated at 4,000,000 lbs......Sept. 1, 1895 The national irrigation congress opens its fourth annual session at Albuquerque......Sept. 16, 1895 United States government establishes the United States marine hospital sanitorium at Fort Stanton and the general hospital for the care of army patients afflicted with tuberculosis at Fort Bayard......November, 1895 Francis Schlatter, the divine healer, creates a sensation in New Mexico and Colorado because of his alleged marvellous cures of human ills......December, 1895 Resolved, that we recognize that the early attainment of Statehood is a matter of paramount importance to the people of New Mexico at present, and insist that no partisan or personal advantage shall stand in the w
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, California Volunteers. (search)
Companies D, I and K. Engagement at Pinos Altos Mines January 29, 1863 (Co. A ). To Tucson and Messilla February, 1863 (Cos. C and H ). Engagement at Cajou de Arivaypo, Apache Pass, April 25, 1863 (Co. K ). Stationed May, 1863, at Fort Stanton (Co. A ), Fort Bowie (Co. E ), Tucson (Cos. C, F and H ), Fort Craig (Cos. B, D, G, I and K ). Skirmish, Cajou de Arivaypa, May 7, 1863. At Fort Stanton June, 1863. Crook's Canon, N. Mex., July 24, 1863 (Co. E ). Skirmishes, ChirFort Stanton June, 1863. Crook's Canon, N. Mex., July 24, 1863 (Co. E ). Skirmishes, Chiricahua Mountains, September 8-9, 1863. Skirmish, Gila River, November 5, 1863. Skirmish, San Andreas Mountains, January 26, 1864 (Detachment). Operations in New Mexico and Arizona February 1-March 7, 1864. Expedition from Camp Mimbres February 24-29, 1864 (Detachment). Pinos Altos, Ariz., February 27, 1864. Skirmish at foot of Sierra Bonita April 7, 1864 (Companies F and I ). Doubtful Canon, N. Mex., May 4, 1864 (Company I ). Gila River Expedition, Arizona, May 25-July 13
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Mexico Volunteers. (search)
zed May 31, 1862, by consolidation of the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th Regiments of New Mexico Infantry. Attached to Dept. of New Mexico, and engaged in operations against Indians in New Mexico and Arizona, and on garrison duty by detachments, at Forts Stanton, Goodwin, McRae, Wingate, Craig, Canby, Sumner, Marcy, Bascom, Union, and other points in that Department, during entire term of service. Skirmishes at Jornado del Muerta June 16, 1863. Warm Springs, Fort McRae, June 20. Operations aArizona, December 26, 1864-January 1, 1865. Expedition from Fort Wingate to Sierra del Datil January 2-10, 1865. Scout from Fort Wingate to Sierra del Datil January 11-21 (Detachment). Scout from Fort Sumner March 15-21. Scout from Fort Stanton April 12-25 (Cos. A, H ). Regiment mustered out September 30, 1866. 1st New Mexico Battalion Cavalry and Infantry. Organized from 1st Cavalry August 31, 1866. Duty in the Department of New Mexico and Arizona till November, 1867.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
ed to complete organization.) 9th Rhode Island Regiment Infantry. Organized at Providence May 26, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., by Detachments, May 27 and 29. Duty at Camp Frieze, Tennallytown, till July. Moved to Fairfax Seminary, Va., July 1. Garrison duty in the Defenses of Washington till September. Company A at Fort Greble, B at Fort Meigs, C at Fort Ricketts, D at Fort Snyder, E and K at Fort Baker, F at Fort Carroll, G at Fort Dupont, H at Fort Wagner, I at Fort Stanton and L at Fort Davis. Mustered out September 2, 1862. Regiment lost 4 by disease. 10th Rhode Island Regiment Infantry. Organized at Providence May 26, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., May 27-29. Attached to Samuel D. Sturgis' Command, Military District of Washington. Duty at Camp Frieze, Tennallytown, till June 26. Assigned to garrison duty in the Defenses of Washington. Company A at Fort Franklin, B and K at Fort Pennsylvania, C at Fort Cameron, D at Fort DeRussy
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1848. (search)
the face of the enemy is a stern school, but the most thorough for a soldier. So well did he improve it, that the brigade commander under whom he served his last campaign, and whose fullest confidence he won,—General Revere, a veteran in service,—describes him as a truly splendid officer and magnificently brave. Immediately after the battle of Bull Run the Excelsior Brigade was ordered to Washington, and put in the defences of the city. The large fort on the Eastern Branch, known as Fort Stanton, was built under the immediate supervision of Major Stevens. In October his command was ordered to Lower Maryland, and stationed for some time at Budd's Ferry, opposite Shipping Point, where Rebel batteries blocked the passage of the Potomac. During the winter of preparation and drill which followed, he gained the warm friendship of his division commander, General Hooker. With spring came the campaign of the Peninsula. The division was assigned to the Third Corps, General Heintzelman
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