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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Fannie A. Beers, Memories: a record of personal exeperience and adventure during four years of war. 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company A. (search)
. William Lyng, New Bedford, 19, s; laborer. Jan. 25, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Prior serv. Co. G, 3rd Inf. Samuel A. Macomber, Freetown, 21, s; blacksmith. Dec. 31, 1863. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Simeon A. MacOMBERmber, New Bedford, 44, m; teamster. Aug. 21, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. James Mohan, New Bedford 43, m; tailor. Oct. 20, 1862. Deserted Nov. 6, 1862. N. Y. George Malloy, S. Boston, 22, s; hostler. June 21, 1864. M. O., Sept. 28, 1865. Joseph H. Mallory, Cuba, N. Y., Cr. Roxbury, 19, s; farmer. Oct. 24, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Charles H. Marston, Provincetown, 20, s; seaman. Jan. 4, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Lyman B. Mason, Methuen, 19, s; hatter. March 7, 1864. Wounded Sept. 19, 1864, Winchester, Va. Disch. disa. June 27, 1865. Francis Maxwell, New Bedford, 20, m; stone cutter. Aug. 21, 1862. Disch. disa. Nov. 4, 1862. Daniel McCARTHY, New Bedford, 33, m; laborer. Aug. 19, 1862. Trans. to V. R. C. William McCLOSKEY
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
sionary Ridge. May 15, 1864, he defeated Sigel at New Market, Va., rejoined General Lee, and protected the communications during Sheridan's raid, and did good service at Cold Harbor. Then in conjunction with General Early he discomfited the Federals under Hunter, and made the campaign in Maryland, defeating Wallace at Monocacy. Subsequently he fought in the valley until given command in Southwest Virginia, whence he was called to the cabinet. On the collapse of the government he escaped to Cuba, and visited Canada and Europe before returning home. He then became vice-president of the Lexington and Big Sandy railroad. His death occurred May 17, 1875, at Lexington. John Archibald Campbell John Archibald Campbell, assistant secretary of war, was a Georgian by his birth in Washington, Wilkes county, in that State, June 24, 1811. His grandfather served on the staff of Major-General Greene during the revolution, and his father, Duncan G. Campbell, was a distinguished lawyer, and
Palma, the United States Army, under General Zachary Taylor, lay near the town of Matamoras. Visiting the hospital quarters of a recently-joined volunteer corps from the States, I remarked a bright-eyed youth of some nineteen years, wan with disease, but cheery withal. The interest he inspired led to his removal to army headquarters, where he soon recovered health and became a pet. This was Bob Wheat, son of an Episcopal clergyman, and he had left school to come to the war. He next went to Cuba with Lopez, was wounded and captured, but escaped the garroters to follow General Walker to Nicaragua. Exhausting the capacity of South American patriots to pronounce, he quitted their society in disgust, and joined Garibaldi in Italy, whence his keen scent of combat summoned him home in time to receive a bullet at Manassas. The most complete Dugald Dalgetty possible; he had all the defects of the good qualities of that doughty warrior. Some months after the time of which I am writing,
ich greatly aided the restoration of brotherly feeling. He was a conspicuous figure at the Yorktown centennial, and at the Washington centennial celebration at New York city, at the head of the Virginia troops, he received a magnificent ovation. In 1885 he was nominated for governor by the Democratic party and made a memorable and successful campaign against John S. Wise. After serving as governor until 1890, he became president of the Pittsburg & Virginia railroad. In 1896 he was sent to Cuba as consul-general at Havana, under the circumstances one of the most important positions in the diplomatic service. In this he represented the United States with such dignity and ability that he was retained in the place after the inauguration of President McKinley, through all the trying difficulties preceding the war with Spain. After the outbreak of war he was made a major-general of volunteers in the United States army, and at the close of hostilities was appointed military governor of
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
id record in constructive statesmanship by his staunch advocacy of a strong navy, of civil service reform, and other measures now settled in national policy. After the expiration of his service in the Senate, March, 1895, he engaged in the practice of law at Washington, D. C. In 1898 he was appointed a major-general in the volunteer army of the United States, for the war with Spain, and after peace was secured he served as a member of the commission for the removal of the Spanish forces from Cuba. Brigadier-General Ellison Capers Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, a descendant of an English family which settled in South Carolina among the earliest colonists, was born in Charleston, October 14, 1837. His father, grandfather and several generations of the name, belonged to the parishes of St. Thomas and St. Denis, in Charleston county, in the territory originally called Berkeley county. His mother was of Irish extraction, her father, William McGill, having settled in Kershaw co
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
friendship which was one of the prime features of his life, made him successful as a boy among strangers. Returning to Charleston several years later, he became engineer of a steamer running to Havana, and was occupied as a stationary engineer in Cuba two years. Subsequently he was for several years a locomotive engineer with the South Carolina & Georgia railroad, until in 1858 he was recommended by H. T. Peake, superintendent of the road, whose daughter-in-law he afterward married, as a travel General Lafayette, and received from that generous friend of America a sword which was worn by his son in the war of 1812, by his grandson in 1861-65, and in 1898-99 by a great-grandson, Col. Wilie Jones, of the Second South Carolina regiment, in Cuba. The second Cadwallader Jones, also a native of Virginia, was an ensign in the navy at the outbreak of the war of 1812, and resigned to enter the army, where he rose to the rank of line officer and served through the war. He died about the year 1
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
Chapter 6: The blockade-runners. During the early part of the war blockade-running was carried on from the capes of the chesapeake to the month of the Rio Grande. It was done by vessel of the all sorts and sizes. The most successful were the steamers that i had belonged to the Southern coasting lines, which found themselves thrown out of employment when the war broke out. The rest were small craft, which brought cargoes of more or less value from the Bahamas or Cuba, and carried back cotton. They answered the purpose sufficiently well, for the blockade was not yet rigorous, speed was not an essential, and the familiarity of the skippers with the coast enabled them to elude the ships-of-war, which were neither numerous nor experienced in the business. By April, 1861, the greater part of the last year's cotton crops had been disposed of, and it was estimated that only about one-seventh remained unexported when the blockade was established. Cotton is gathered in September, an
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
151, H4 Cross Timber Hollow, Ark. 66, 1 Crossville, Tenn. 24, 3; 118, 1; 135-A; 150, H10 Crow Creek, Ala. 97, 1 Crow's House, Va. 66, 9; 74, 2; 76, 5; 77, 3; 93, 1; 94, 9 Crow's Nest, Va.: Lookout and signal tower, Sept., 1864 67, 10 Crump's Creek, Va. 16, 1; 19, 1; 20, 1; 21, 9; 74, 1; 81, 3; 92, 1; 96, 6; 100, 1; 137, E8 Crump's Landing, Tenn. 78, 3 Fort Crutchfield, Tenn.: Plan 112, 6 Crystal Springs, Miss. 51, 1; 155, D9 Cuba, Mo. 47, 1 Cubero, N. Mex. 98, 1 Cub Run, Va. 3, 1, 3, 2; 7, 1; 10, 7; 22, 6; 27, 1; 74, 1; 111, 1; 137, A7, 137, C4 Culpeper Court-House, Va. 21, 13; 22, 5; 23, 4, 23, 5; 43, 7; 44, 3; 45, 1; 74, 1; 84, 9; 85, 1, 85, 3; 87, 2; 100, 1; 117, 1; 135-A; 137, B6 Culpeper Ford, Va. 44, 3; 45, 1; 81, 1; 87, 2; 94, 6; 96, 1 Cumberland, Md. 82, 3; 85, 1; 136, D4; 171 Attack on, Aug. 1, 1864. See Pleasant Hill, Md. Cumberland, Army of the Campaigns, 1861-18
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The gold and silver in the Confederate States Treasury. (search)
Benjamin and Breckinridge owed their escape to Wood, for Wood was an old naval officer and a thorough seaman. On the coast of Florida they bought a row-boat, and in company of a few others they rowed down the coast, intending either to cross to Cuba or the Bahamas. A close call. Landing one day for water and to dig clams they saw a Federal gunboat coming up the coast. Wood mentioned as an evidence of the close watch the United States vessels were keeping, that as soon as the gunboat goes vessels at Key West, trying to make their way to Savannah. Wood and party took their boat, as she was a seaworthy craft, put the sailors in the row-boat, and gave them sailing directions for Savannah. Wood then took the helm and steered for Cuba. In a squall that night he was knocked overboard. There was but one man in the boat who knew anything at all about managing her, and it looked black for him. Fortunately he caught the main sheet, which was trailing overboard, and was hauled in.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fragments of war history relating to the coast defence of South Carolina, 1861-‘65, and the hasty preparations for the Battle of Honey Hill, November 30, 1864. (search)
ineer corps and stationed at West Point as assistant professor of engineering until September 24, 1846, when he took the field in General Scott's column in Mexico and served until May 22, 1848; he was breveted for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and for gallant conduct at Contreras and Cherubusco; was promoted captain of engineers. After the Mexican war he served on the coast defences. He resigned December 15, 1854, and with General Quitman, was engaged in preparations for a military expedition in Cuba, but this was abandoned. In 1856 he took charge of the large iron interests of Cooper, Hewitt & Co. at Trenton, N. J. When Fernando Wood was elected mayor of New York he induced General Smith to accept the position of street commissioner, which he held until May, 1861, when he and his deputy, Mansfield Lovell, of Maryland, resigned and joined the Confederate army at Richmond. President Davis commissioned him major-general on September 19, 1861, and assigned him to the command of the 1s
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