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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 20 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 9 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
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on where it would be practicable for us to communicate with each other. From my camp at New Castle ferry we crossed the Pamunkey, marched between Aylett's and Dunkirk on the Mattapony River, and on the 8th of June encamped at Polecat Station. The next day we resumed the march along the North Anna-our advance guard skirmishing y's ford, on the North Anna, to the Catharpen road, as I purposed following that route to Spottsylvania Court House on my return, and thence via Bowling Green and Dunkirk to the White House. About a mile beyond Trevillian the Gordonsville road forks — the left fork leading to Charlottesville-and about a mile beyond the fork Hamptond that supplies were in store for me there; so after sending the wounded, prisoners, and negroes to West Point under an escort of two regiments, I turned back to Dunkirk, on the Mattapony, and crossed to the south side at a place where the stream was narrow enough to bridge with my pontoon-boats. In returning from Trevillian,
ent of Massachusetts militia landed at Fortress Monroe, Va., from the steamer State of Maine.--(Doc. 74.)--J. B. B. in the N. Y. Times, April 22. The citizens of Taunton, Mass., presented Major Robert Anderson a sword, as an expression of their admiration of his courage, loyalty, and devotion to the country. The presentation was made by Capt. W. C. Levering at the Brevoort House in New York.--Tribune, April 22. Union meetings were held at Schenectady, Hudson, Utica, Waverley, and Dunkirk, N. Y; Stockbridge. Mass.; Bridgeport, Conn.; Springfield and Chicago, Ill. During the proceedings at Chicago, at the suggestion of Judge Mannierre, the whole audience raised their right hands and took the oath of allegiance to the Union, repeating the oath after the Judge.--Detroit Free Press. A Southern merchant writes to a correspondent in New York: ---, Tenn., April 20, 1861. Gentlemen: Our note to you for $187 12100, due to-day, has not been paid. We deeply regret the
to the scene of war, stating that he wanted to fight for the graves of his ancestors, and he could not understand why his master should object to his going, when the Massachusetts people had placed a negro in command of one of their divisions. The story of General Butler's African descent had been communicated to him. The Sixth Indiana Regiment, Colonel Crittenden, fully armed and equipped, passed through Cincinnati, O., on their way to the scene of action. The Dunkirk Battalion left Dunkirk for the city of New York. At Bethlehem, Pa., a very interesting ceremony took place at the Young Ladies' Seminary. Three national flags were raised on the principal buildings. Mr. Van Kirk, one of the Professors, made a patriotic speech, and the pupils, who were gathered upon the roof of the Seminary, amid loud cheers, raised the Star-Spangled Banner. Nearly two hundred young ladies joined in singing national airs. After the ceremonies, the pupils, with flags and banners, paraded the to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
riven several miles from the position he had determined to hold against Sheridan's further advance. The conclusion of Sheridan, on the night of the 12th, was evidently sound; the movement of Hunter had rendered it impracticable to carry out his orders in the presence of Hampton. On the 18th of June Sheridan learned that supplies awaited him at White House; which depot he was ordered to break up, transferring its contents to the new base. On the 19th the column crossed the Mattapony at Dunkirk, and on the 20th its commander learned that White House was threatened by the enemy. It was guarded by a small detachment, made up of invalids, dismounted cavalry, and colored infantry, commanded by General Getty, who was en route to join his permanent command. Sheridan moved leisurely to the spot, found the enemy on the bluffs overlooking the depot, and drove them away. Having made all preparations on the 24th, Sheridan took up the line of march for Petersburg, with his valuable charge
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
f them: the expedition of the Duke of York to Dunkirk, in 1793, suggested to the English, by ancient of France, that it was necessary to conquer Dunkirk in 1793, and to deliver Holland in 1799; thating the space which extends from Huninguen to Dunkirk, presented three principal zones: that of theleft comprehended the extent of from Givet to Dunkirk. When France declared war, in the month ofhe camp of Cambrai, they ran excentrically to Dunkirk on one side, and to Landau on the other. I choice reserve successively to the succor of Dunkirk, Maubeuge and of Landau; so that this small mations of the French at the end of 1793, fron Dunkirk to Landau, those of Napoleon in 1796, in 1809third only of her frontier, (from Besancon to Dunkirk), without there yet being sufficient in third Considering that France has two fronts, from Dunkirk to Basle, one from Basle to Savoy, one from Srty battalions, transported successively from Dunkirk to Menin, to Mauberge and to Landan, by reinf
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
ce of an open frontier. The former is applied to the side of France towards Belgium, and the latter, with certain modifications, to the defence of Western Germany. The first line of fortifications on the northern frontier of France consists of Dunkirk, Lille, Valenciennes, Conde, Quesnoy, Rocroi, Charlemont, Mezieres, and Sedan; the second line, of Calais, Andres, St. Omer, Bethune, Arras, Douai, Chambrai, Landrecies, and Avesnes; the third line, of Boulogne, Montreuil, Hesdin, Abbeville, Amirient, with its harbor defences; Fort Cigogne; Brest, with its harbor defences; St. Malo, with Forts Cezembre, La Canchee, L'Anse du Verger, and Des Rimains; Cherbourg, with its defensive forts and batteries; Havre, Dieppe, Boulogne, Calais, and Dunkirk. Cherbourg, Brest, and Rochefort, are great naval depots; and Havre, Nantes, and Bordeaux, the principal commercial ports. Many of the works above enumerated are small in extent and antiquated in their construction, and some of them quite old
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
n 1755, a French fleet of twenty-five sail of the line, and many smaller vessels, sailed from Brest for America. Nine of these soon afterwards returned to France, and the others proceeded to the gulf of St. Lawrence. An English fleet of seventeen sail of the line and some frigates ates had been sent out to intercept them; hut the two fleets passed each other in a thick fog, and all the French vessels except two reached Quebec in safety. In 1759, a French fleet, blockaded in the port of Dunkirk by a British force under Commodore Bogs, seizing upon a favorable opportunity, escaped from the enemy, attacked the coast of Scotland, made a descent upon Carrickfergus, and cruised about till February, 1760, without meeting a single British vessel, although sixty-one ships of the line were then stationed upon the coasts of England and France, and several of these were actually in pursuit. In 1796, when the French attempted to throw the army of Hoche into Ireland, the most strenuous effo
Malvern Hill, Va. 20 Wilderness, Va. 4 Bristoe Station, Va. (1862) 7 Spotsylvania, Va. 4 Manassas, Va. 2 North Anna, Va. 1 Fredericksburg, Va. 1 Petersburg, Va. 3 Chancellorsville, Va. 18 On Picket, Va. 1 Gettysburg, Pa. 15     Present, also Yorktown; Fair Oaks, Glendale; Totopotomoy; Cold Harbor; Deep Bottom (1 Co.); Peeble's Farm. notes.--Recruited principally in New York city and Chautauqua county, Company B coming from Jamestown, N. Y., and Companies D and E from Dunkirk, N. Y. A regimental organization was effected at Staten Island, where the other regiments of Sickles's Brigade were forming, and in June, 1861, the command left for Washington. The brigade was attached to Hooker's Division and ordered on duty along the Lower Potomac, where it remained until it joined General McClellan's army in 1862. Colonel Taylor commanded the brigade at Williamsburg, where it received the principal force of the enemy's attack. The Seventy-second held an advanced positi
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
general concentration, they are using to defend it. Do not, for a moment, look for the annihilation, the hiving, or the total rout of Lee. Such things exist only in the New York Herald. To return to our Mt. Carmel. About seven came a negro who reported the whole Rebel army retreating on Richmond — a vague expression which left them room to halt anywhere this side of it. Soon after Tick Wadsworth — son of the late General--came in from General Sheridan and reported the cavalry corps at Dunkirk. This was welcome news to us. Sheridan had been sent on a raid towards Richmond and had destroyed railroads and depots of stores to a considerable extent. Also recaptured some hundreds of our prisoners on their way to the capital. He was delayed on his return by the rise of the Pamunkey, but got pontoons from Fortress Monroe and crossed it. On his way down, Stuart's cavalry tried to stop him, but he pitched into them, took two guns and a number of prisoners, and killed Stuart, driving of
oc. 121; speech at Chicago, Ill., Doc. 298; speech before the Illinois Legislature, D. 45; death of, D. 91; dying words of P. 110 Dover, Delaware, meeting at, D. 103 Dover, N. H., Union meeting at, D. 25 Draper, Simeon, D. 52 Dr. Watts to Jonathan, P. 99 Duganne, A. J. H., P. 19 Dummer, C. H., D. 28 Dumont, E., report of the battle of Philippi, Va., Doc. 333 Duncombe T. (Eng.), D. 83; speech in the English House of Commons, May 23, Doc. 302 Dunkirk, N. Y., meeting at, D. 35 Duryea, A., Col., D. 77, 82; Doc. 271; at Hampton, Va., D. 80; proclamation to the people of Hampton, Va., Doc. 296; report of the battle at Great Bethel, Va., Doc. 358 Duryea, Lieut., D. 91 D'Utassy, Frederick Geo., Col., Garibaldi Guard, D. 84; Doc. 307 E Eagle Henry, commander of U. S. steamer Star, Doc. 261 East Baltimore, Md., Union meeting in, D. 50, 69; patriotic resolutions of, Doc. 243 East Fairhaven, Mass., secession flag
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