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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
uder will hold their positions in front of the enemy against attack, and make such demonstrations on Thursday as to discover his operations. Should opportunity offer, the feint will be converted into a real attack, and should an abandonment of his intrenchments by the enemy be discovered, he will be closely pursued. 3. The Third Virginia Cavalry will observe the Charles City road. The Fifth Virginia, the First North Carolina, and the Hampton Legion (cavalry) will observe the Darbytown, Varina, and Osborne roads. Should a movement of the enemy down the Chickahominy be discovered, they will close upon his flank and endeavor to arrest his march. 4. General Stuart with the First, Fourth, and Ninth Virginia Cavalry, the cavalry of Cobb's Legion and the Jeff Davis Legion, will cross the Chickahominy to-morrow and take position to the left of General Jackson's line of march. The main body will be held in reserve, with scouts well extended to the front and left. General Stuart will
Chapter 74: after release in 1867, to 1870. When Mr. Davis was released, we were pecuniarily prostrate, our plantations had been laid waste and seized. The little money we had, had been sent by the Southern cities to me for my maintenance, and to give him comforts in prison. Poor in purse but moderate in our wants, we turned our faces to the world and cast about for a way to maintain our little children, four in number, Margaret, Jefferson, William, and Varina. Mr. Davis's fate hung upon the action of the United States Courts; we knew that one effort had been made to suborn a witness, The unhappy and innocent victim of sectional rancor, Captain Wirz. but he was fortunately a Confederate, and died in preference to the infamy. My brothers were unable to trust themselves in the country; Becket on account of the Sum/er and Alabama, and Jefferson, whose causeless imprisonment had for a time invalided him. We had little, and my husband's health was apparently hopelessly gone
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
iver navigation, it was a success; as a military operation it was a failure. The work was done under the direction of Major Peter S. Michie, Acting Chief-Engineer of the Army of the James. The work on the canal was considerably advanced when the enterprise we are now considering was undertaken. According to arrangement, Ord and Birney crossed the river on, pontoon bridges muffled with hay on the night of the 28th, the former at Aiken's and the latter at Deep Bottom. Ord pushed along the Varina road at dawn. His chief commanders were Generals Burnham, Weitzel, Heckman, Roberts and Stannard, and Colonel Stevens. His van soon encountered the Confederate pickets, and after a march of about three miles, they came Huts at Dutch Gap. this was the appearance of the north bank of the James River, at Dutch Gap, when the writer sketched it, at the close of 1864. the bank was there almost perpendicular, and rose about thirty feet above the water. These huts and excavations were near
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
on the south side of the James to a point near Varina or Aikens' Landing. The Eighteenth Army Co point marked Newmarket on the map, across the Varina road, partially along the Kingsland road, whicf a mile beyond that point to a point near the Varina road, at a point about three hundred (300) yar's lines nearly opposite his position upon the Varina road. At the same time, General Birney, havinine in his front he is to move right on up the Varina road, and endeavor to reach the intrenched camworks at Chaffin's farm is to pass them by the Varina road, or turn them near the house of J. AikensRichmond. General Ord will observe that the Varina road runs within two miles of the river, and hwmarket road at the junction of which with the Varina road he will probably be met with some force, ked him by what road he came. He said: By the Varina road, and I said to him: That is covered by tht off two very heavy guns across the bridge at Varina. In a few minutes' consultation I assured him[2 more...]
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
lad if they had put a Chinese wall across there without an opening in it. I had determined that they should not come in there, and I had no call to go out because I had a line of more than twenty miles on its shores guarded by our navy where troops could be embarked and where expeditions could be sent across the rivers by pontoon bridges. I had three pontoon bridges, one across the Appomattox, during the whole time of my occupation, and two across the James, one at Deep Bottom, and one at Varina. Over these, between the 14th of June and the 25th of December, 1864, Grant ordered the following expeditions, composed of a corps or more, sometimes from both armies, to move in attack upon Richmond and elsewhere:-- May 28, Smith's corps to Cold Harbor; returned June 14. June 9, Gillmore crossed the Appomattox and attacked Petersburg. June 11, I sent Gillmore to attack Petersburg. June 15, the Eighteenth Corps under Smith was sent to attack Petersburg by order of Grant. June
k, Fifth Avenue Hotel. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General. [Cipher.] City Point, Va., Nov. 2, 1864, 5 P. M. Major-General Terry: Send a good large brigade of infantry with two batteries of Napoleon guns to report to General Butler at New York at once. If you have Western troops, they will be preferable, Answer what troops you send. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant General. [Cipher.] Washington, D. C., Nov. 2, 1864 [Received 1 P. M.]. Major-General Terry, headquarters Tenth Army Corps, near Varina, Va., in the field near Richmond: You will be ordered to send troops to me at New York. Select those which are reliable. Confer with Weitzel. It may become necessary to make composite brigades. Great activity in getting them off will be required. They are to be going to Wilmington. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. [no. 87. see page 758.] New York, Nov. 8, 1864. Major-General Butler, Commanding City of New York: Sir:--By one of my detectives, corroborated by a member o
ruder will hold their positions in front of the enemy against attack, and make such demonstrations, Thursday, as to discover his operations. Should opportunity offer, the feint will be converted into a real attack; and should an abandonment of his intrenchments by the enemy be discovered, he will be closely pursued. III. The Third Virginia cavalry will observe the Charles City road. The Fifth Virginia, the First North-Carolina, and the Hampton Legion cavalry will observe the Darbytown, Varina, and Osborne roads. Should a movement of the enemy, down the Chickahominy, be discovered, they will close upon his flank, and endeavor to arrest his march. IV. General Stuart, with the First, Fourth, and Ninth Virginia cavalry, the cavalry of Cobb's Legion and the Jeff Davis Legion, will cross the Chickahominy, to-morrow, and take position to the left of General Jackson's line of march. The main body will be held in reserve, with scouts well extended to the front and left. General Stuar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of operations of Bratton's brigade from May 7th, 1864 to January, 1865. (search)
) Bridge, marched through Seven Pines battlefield, where we bivouacked for two days. On the evening of 15th I received orders to move up the Kingsland road to the Varina road, and picket towards the river from Deep Bottom up. We arrived at the place designated about 10 o'clock P. M. We found no enemy in this vicinity, except squad when they were found, which was not until some time after dark. Knowing little or nothing of the country in front, and only that the enemy were advancing up the Varina road, I immediately moved Johnson's brigade from Four-Mile creek up to B. Aiken's house, to secure Chaffin's from disaster. Night closed in before I found the pited and ready for an advance at early dawn. I, moreover, discovered by means of scouts that there was no enemy in advance of their usual lines on the left of the Varina road. At daybreak the next morning the pickets on the right (from Johnson's brigade) advanced and found the enemy on Signal Hill throwing up entrenchments. I re
he following communication to Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange, in charge of the flag-of-truce boat, which on the same day I delivered to him at Varina, on James River: war Department Richmond, Va, August 10, 1864 Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: You have several times proposed to obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. On the afternoon of the thirtieth August, I was notified that the flag-of-truce steamer had again appeared at Varina. On the following day I sent to Major Mulford the following note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August 31, 1864. Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchangectfully, your obedient servant, Ro Ould, Agent of Exchange. In a short time I received the following response, to wit: flag-truce steamer New York, Varina, Va., August 31, 1864. Honorable R. Ould. Agent for Exchange: sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of to-day, requesting answer, &c., to
he following communication to Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange, in charge of the flag-of-truce boat, which on the same day I delivered to him at Varina, on James River: war Department Richmond, Va, August 10, 1864 Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: You have several times proposed to obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. On the afternoon of the thirtieth August, I was notified that the flag-of-truce steamer had again appeared at Varina. On the following day I sent to Major Mulford the following note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August 31, 1864. Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchangectfully, your obedient servant, Ro Ould, Agent of Exchange. In a short time I received the following response, to wit: flag-truce steamer New York, Varina, Va., August 31, 1864. Honorable R. Ould. Agent for Exchange: sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of to-day, requesting answer, &c., to
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