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Our loss was twenty-four killed and forty-one wounded. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, H. Forno, Colonel Fifth Louisiana Regiment. Report of Brigadier-General Robertson of Second battle of Manassas. in camp, near Garysburg, N. C., October 12, 1862. Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Cavalry Division, A. N. V.: sir: In obedience to orders from your headquarters, early on the morning of the twentieth of August, 1862, I crossed the Rapidan River, at Tobacco Crety. Very respectfully, sir, Your obedient servant, B. H. Robertson, Brigadier-General, commanding Cavalry. Report of Brigadier-General Robertson of events subsequent to Second battle of Manassas. headquarters cavalry brigade, Garysburg, N. C., October 15, 1862. Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Cavalry Division, A. N. V.: sir: On the afternoon of Saturday, August thirtieth, when the rout of the enemy had become general, I moved my entire brigade rapidly forward in order
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations against Newbern in 1864. (search)
espectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) G. E. Pickett, Major-General Commanding. To General S. Cooper, A. I. General, Richmond, Va. Report of General Hoke. head quarters Hoke's brigade, Kinston, North Carolina, February 8th, 1864. Major,--In obedience to orders, I reported to Major-General Pickett, with letters to him from the Commanding-General, on Friday, 22d of January, at Petersburg, and there awaited the arrival of my command, which was immediately forwarded to Garysburg, near Weldon. I expected to find General Corse's at Petersburg, but learned it could not reach there before Wednesday, 27th January, which delayed our movements from this point until Friday, the 29th. In the meantime the artillery was collected and placed upon cars, as it was to be shipped to Richmond, and every piece supplied with a sufficient quantity of ammunition. The horses were sent to the country to recruit, and after getting several miles in the country were ordered to Wilming
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 9: State of religion in 1861-62. (search)
ment fairly held its own and made some advance, and that there was at least as much religious zeal in the camps as among the Churches at home. I select only a few extracts from newspaper reports, which illustrate the condition of things during the summer and autumn of 186I. A writer, speaking of the religious services in the Fourth North Carolina Regiment, says: There are four ministers of the Gospel attached to this regiment. Sabbath before last a most solemn service was held at Garysburg. The sacrament of the Lord's Supper was administered to the Christian professors of the regiment. The services were conducted by Rev. Captain Miller, aided by several other clergymen. The thought that it would probably be the last time in which some would participate in the ordinance, and that before another opportunity occurred they might be on the field of battle, affected every mind, and gave great tenderness to the meeting. I have spent, says Rev. W. J. W. Crowder, most of
ssed to his soul, and that he should, with divine help, live a new life and consecrate himself to the cause of God. I have been able to supply many with the Bible, especially as the President of the Christian Association in Fredericksburg had given me a fine lot of Bibles. A writer, speaking of the religious services in the Fourth North Carolina regiment, says: There are four ministers of the gospel attached to this regiment. Sabbath before last a most solemn service was held at Garysburg. The sacrament of the Lord's Supper was administered to the Christian professors of the regiment. The services were conducted by Rev. Captain Miller, aided by several other clergymen. The thought that it would probably be the last time in which some would participate in the ordinance, and that before another opportunity occurs they might be on the field of battle, affected every mind, and gave great tenderness to the meeting. I have spent, says Rev. W. J. W. Crowder, most of th
ecided to enter the Confederacy, Lieutenant Daniel offered his experience and soldierly ability, and upon the organization of the Fourteenth infantry regiment at Garysburg was elected colonel, and commissioned June 3, 1861. His regiment was an ideal one in its composition, representing the best families of the State, and he gave of secession. In the latter part of May he resigned his seat in this body and accepted appointment as major of the Fourth infantry regiment, in organization at Garysburg under Col. George B. Anderson. He reached Virginia after the battle of First Manassas; May 1, 1862,was promoted lieutenant-colonel, and thereafter commanded hisiting depot at Baltimore, whence he returned to North Carolina, and made ready for service the First, or Bethel, regiment. On May 16th, being post commandant at Garysburg, he was elected colonel of the Third infantry. He was with this command at Suffolk until in August, 1861, when he took command of Fisher's famous Sixth regiment
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General George Burgwyn Anderson—The memorial address of Hon. A. M. Waddell, May 11, 1885. (search)
is friendship. It was that indescribable illumination of the countenance by which the tenderness of a brave soul reveals itself and captivates the beholder—the benevolent, frank, gladsome smile which marks a lovable nature. And surely if any man ever possessed such a nature—a soft, gentle, refined, winning, and almost womanly spirit—it was he. Yet not Richard of England, nor Arnold Winkelried could look more unquailing in the face of death. Completing its organization and equipment at Garysburg, his regiment proceeded to Manassas, but not in time for the battle of the 21st of July. Colonel Anderson was soon afterwards made commandant of the post there and superintended the construction of the defensive works in the vicinity. The best possible evidence of the extraordinary esteem in which, even at this early period of his career, he was held by his superior officers, is to be found in an incident related to me by Major John W. Dunham, who was then his adjutant-general. Major Dun<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Forty-Ninth N. C. Infantry, C. S. A. [from the Charlotte, N. C., Observer, October 20, 27, 1895.] (search)
ty-Ninth Regiment of North Carolina State troops was composed of ten companies of infantry, enlisted from the counties of McDowell, I; Cleveland, 2; Iredell, 2; Moore, I; Mecklenburg, I; Gaston, I; Catawba, I; and Lincoln, 1, which assembled at Garysburg, in the month of March, 1862. It was constituted, at its formation, wholly of volunteers, many of whom had sought service in the earlier periods of the war, and all of whom had responded to the call for soldiers as soon as it was practicable t fall and winter it was constantly on the move. On June 9th, 1863, Thomas R. Roulhac was appointed sergeant major from Manly's battery, which was then in the army of Northern Virginia. In the latter part of October he joined the regiment at Garysburg, and served in that capacity and as acting adjutant until appointed first lieutenant of Company D, in June, 1864. On January 28th, 1864, the command left Weldon for Kinston, and there became a part of the forces under Generals Pickett and Ho
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
tered in the official records of the adjutant-general at Raleigh, as the 13th Regiment Volunteers. The several companies were ordered to rendezvous at Garysburg, Northampton county, and the line officers thereof directed to hold an election for field officers on Wednesday, the 10th of July, 1861. At the election so held John F. Hny K—Captain Robert D. Johnston, Lincoln. On Wednesday, July 17, 1861, Colonel Hoke, with seven companies of the regiment, left the Camp of Instruction at Garysburg, N. C., for Virginia, leaving three companies, viz: C, D and H behind, because of the much sickness (measles) among the men. These seven companies reached Manassas ng, but took no part therein as they were not ordered to the field. On August 5th, the three remaining companies, under command of Major Christie, broke camp at Garysburg. After several days of delay at Richmond, Va., for want of transportation facilities, the three companies were enabled to reach their destination and join the r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
lowers; D. G. McRae, Co. E, was elected second lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Copell. On the 10th of February, 1823, the regiment was ordered to proceed to Washington, N. C., but on reaching Goldsboro the order was changed and the regiment ordered to Halifax, thence to Hamilton. On February 12, under orders from General Gatlin, the troops returned to Halifax, and then proceeded to Weldon to defend the bridge at that point, reaching Camp Leavenworth, on the east side of the river near Garysburg, on the 14th. The regiment remained here until the 18th, when it was ordered to Camp Floyd, on the west side of the river, near Weldon. While in camp at this place there was much sickness and many deaths. On the 21st the regiment was ordered to Camp Vance, two miles east of Goldsboro, on the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, and on the 22nd was attached to the 3rd Brigade, Army of North Carolina, commanded by General Joseph R. Anderson. This brigade was composed of the 1st South Caroli
Martin, Adjutant General of North Carolina, came down on Saturday to inspect, muster in, and make final arrangements for the troops. To say that he is a fine officers would be but a meagre award to his merits. He is a finished scholar, man of business, and gentleman. Would that all the departments wore supplied with a head so able. The sickness in this Regiment has been far less than in any other, and would have been a small item, bad not one of our companies contracted measles in Garysburg previous to its arrival here. This fact seems to corroborate the statement that the health of Halifax has undergone a manifest improvement within ten or fifteen years. We should be wanting in justice to the fairer portion of the inhabitants of this town, did we fail to notice in this connection their thoughtful care of the sick, by useful contributions of every sort, as well as personal attentions, they have been chiefly instrumental in ridding the hospital of its inmates. In a few d
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