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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennsylvania, (search)
phia......November, 1739 American philosophical society established in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin......1743 Hostilities with the Six Nations, after a bloody collision between them and the backwoodsmen of Virginia, are averted by a treaty at Lancaster between Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Maryland and the Six Nations, the Indians ceding the whole valley of the Ohio for £ 400......July, 1744 War of England with France, termed King George's War ......1744 For the reduction of Louisburg, Pennsylvania furnishes £ 4,000 in provisions......1745 Thomas and Richard Penn the sole proprietors of Pennsylvania, Thomas holding three-quarters of the whole by bequest from his brother John, who dies this year ......1746 Over 5,000 immigrants, mostly Germans, arrive in Pennsylvania......1750 Franklin identifies lightning and electricity......June 5, 1752 French build a fort at Presque Isle, now Erie......1753 One at Le Boeuf, on French Creek......1753 Another at Venan
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rhode Island, (search)
500 and £ 10 for any one who takes a ticket......Jan. 23, 1733 Sloop Pelican, the first whaling vessel from Rhode Island, arrives at Newport with cargo......June, 1733 Assembly meets at Greenwich for the first time......Feb. 18, 1734 Newport artillery incorporated by act of Assembly......Feb. 1, 1742 Gen. Nathanael Greene born at Potowamet, in township of Warwick......May 22, 1742 Legislature resolves to raise 150 men and to fit out the colony ship Tartar for the siege of Louisburg......May, 1745 Two large privateers, with 400 men, sail from Newport into a northeast snowstorm, are lost, and nearly 200 women in Newport are made widows......Dec. 24, 1745 Eastern boundary of Rhode Island, disputed by Massachusetts and settled by a royal commission in 1741, is confirmed by royal decree received......Nov. 11, 1746 Company of the Redwood Library, formed in 1735 at Newport, receives a charter from the colony......August, 1747 Providence Library Association chart
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Warren, Sir Peter 1702-1752 (search)
Warren, Sir Peter 1702-1752 Naval officer; born in Ireland, in 1702; entered the British navy in 1727, and was commodore in 1745, when he commanded an expedition against Louisburg, joining the land forces from Massachusetts under General Pepperell. He took possession of Louisburg on June 17. Afterwards he was made a rear-admiral, and, in 1747, defeated the French in an action off Cape Finisterre, capturing the greater part of their fleet. Admiral Warren married the eldest daughter of Sthusetts under General Pepperell. He took possession of Louisburg on June 17. Afterwards he was made a rear-admiral, and, in 1747, defeated the French in an action off Cape Finisterre, capturing the greater part of their fleet. Admiral Warren married the eldest daughter of Stephen De Lancey, of New York, and became the owner of a large tract of land in the Mohawk region, in charge of which he placed his nephew, William Johnson, afterwards Sir William. Sir Peter died in Ireland, July 29, 1752.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Watson, Sir Brook 1735- (search)
Watson, Sir Brook 1735- Military officer; born in Plymouth, England, Feb. 7, 1735; entered the naval service early in life, but while bathing in the sea at Havana in 1749 a shark bit off his right leg below the knee, and he abandoned the sea and entered upon mercantile business. He was with Colonel Monckton in Nova Scotia in 1755, and was at the siege of Louisburg in 1758, having in charge Wolfe's division, as commissary. In 1759 he settled as a merchant in London, and afterwards in Montreal. Just before the Revolutionary War he visited several of the colonies, with false professions of political friendship for them, as a Whig. A friend of Sir Guy Carleton, he was made his commissary-general in America in 1782, and from 1784 to 1793 he was member of Parliament for London. He was sheriff of London and Middlesex, and in 1796 was lord mayor. For his services in America, Parliament voted his wife an annuity of $2,000 for life. From 1798 to 1806 he was commissary-general of E
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webb, Thomas 1724-1796 (search)
Webb, Thomas 1724-1796 Clergyman; born in England in 1724; was an officer in the British army; served with the Royal American forces, being wounded at Louisburg and Quebec; became a Methodist in 1765, and was licensed to preach; and was made barrack master at Albany, N. Y., about the same time. In 1767 he went to New York City, and there aided Philip Embury in the work of the Methodist Society. After being retired from the army with the rank of captain, he devoted his time to missionary work in New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland. In 1767 he established the first Methodist Society in Philadelphia, Pa. He visited England several times, and permanently settled there at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. He died in Bristol, England, Dec. 20, 1796.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Westminster Abbey. (search)
kindling with the passion with which he pleaded the rights of the colonists. There, too, lies Wilberforce, whose benevolent principles were practically the great question at stake in the American Civil War, and from whom the American abolitionists W. Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips drew no small part of their inspiration. Among the statesmen in the north transept, next to the statue of Lord Beaconsfield, is the monument of the Irish admiral, Sir Peter Warren, who helped to take Louisburg from the French in 1745. He commanded on the American Station for years, and owned the tract of land in New York City once known as Greenwich Village. His house was still shown in 1863. Warren Street and Warren Place— which run through part of his original property—are named from him. Roubiliac in his bust has been so faithful as to indicate even the marks of the small-pox on Sir Peter's face. Then, passing along the north ambulatory, take a long look at the monument of the little, si
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Stephen 1693-1782 (search)
Williams, Stephen 1693-1782 Clergyman; born in Deerfield, Mass., May 14, 1693; was carried captive by the Indians to Canada with his family in 1704; redeemed by the French governor and sent to Boston in 1705. He wrote a narrative of his experiences in captivity; graduated at Harvard College in 1713; taught in Hadley in 1713-14; was ordained in the Congregational Church and took a charge in Longmeadow, Mass., in 1716; visited the Housatonic Indians, in Stockbridge, Mass., and established a mission among them in 1734; and was chaplain of a regiment in the expedition against Louisburg in 1745 and in the campaign of 1756. He died in Longmeadow, Mass., June 10, 1782.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wolcott, Roger 1679-1767 (search)
Wolcott, Roger 1679-1767 Colonial governor; born in Windsor, Conn., Jan. 4, 1679; was apprenticed to a mechanic at the age of twelve years. By industry and economy he afterwards acquired a competent fortune. In the expedition against Canada in 1711 he was commissary of the Connecticut forces, and had risen to major-general in 1745, when he was second in command at the capture of Louisburg. He was afterwards, successively, a legislator, county judge, chief-justice of the Supreme Court, and governor (1751-54). In 1725 he published Poetical Meditations, and he left a long manuscript poem descriptive of the Pequod War, which is preserved in the collections of the Connecticut Historical Society. He died in Windsor, Conn., May 17, 1767.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wolfe, James 1727- (search)
Wolfe, James 1727- Military officer; born in Westerham, Kent, England, Jan. 2, 1727; distinguished himself in the army when he was only twenty years of age; and was quartermaster-general in the expedition against Rochefort in 1757. At the secondcapture of Louisburg by the English, in 1758, he acquired such fame that Pitt placed him at the head of the expedition against Quebec in 1759, with the rank of major-general, though only thirty-three years of age. On the evening of Sept. 12, Wolfe, who had just recovered from a serious attack of fever, embarked with his main army on the St. Lawrence, above Point Levi, and floated up the river with the flood-tide. He was preparing for an attack upon the French the next day. The evening was warm and starlit. Wolfe was in better spirits than usual, and at the evening mess, with a glass of wine in his hand, and by the light of a lantern, he sang the little campaign song beginning: Why, soldiers, why Should we be melancholy, boys? Why,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wooster, David 1710- (search)
Wooster, David 1710- Military officer; born in Stratford, Conn., March 2, 1710; graduated at Yale College in 1738, and was made captain of an armed vessel to protect the Connecticut coast in 1739. He commanded the sloop-of-war Connecticut, which convoyed troops on the expedition against Louisburg in 1745, and was sent in command of a cartel-ship, but was not permitted to land in France. Made captain in Pepperell's regiment, he afterwards received half-pay until 1774, and, as colonel and brigadier-general, served David Wooster. through the French and Indian War. He served in the campaign in Canada in 1775, having been made a brigadier-general in June that year. After the death of Montgomery, he was in chief command for some months, after which he resigned and was made major-general of Connecticut militia. While opposing the invasion of Tryon, sent to destroy stores at Danbury, he was mortally wounded (April 27, 1777), at Ridgefield, and died, May 2 following. The State of
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