hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 66 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 61 61 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 334 results in 101 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 11: McDowell. (search)
of incredible difficulties, were equal to any display of these qualities, ever made upon the field of a great victory. The mountain-sides afforded a road-bed so stony, that no floods could soften it; and on Saturday, the army passed over to Whitehall in Albemarle, by a track rough, but firm, cheered by a brilliant sun, and full of confidence and elation. The Sabbath morning dawned upon them clear and soft, in their pleasant bivouacs along the green meadows of Moorman's river; and the Gene and retire to the Blue Ridge. Thus the advanced forces of Milroy were brought within ten miles of Staunton, and he was about to establish his communications with the Federalists at Harrisonburg. General Jackson therefore pressed forward from Whitehall to Staunton, reaching the latter place at evening on the Sabbath; to the unspeakable delight of the inhabitants, who had only heard that the army had disappeared again into Eastern Virginia, no one knew whither. By Monday evening, the whole ar
hundred men, encamped in the vicinity of New Haven, Ky., was surprised and captured by a detachment of Wolford's cavalry, under command of Captain Adams, First Kentucky, without firing a shot.--(Doc. 76.) The army of the Potomac was withdrawn from Fredericksburgh, Va., to the north side of the Rappahannock, because General Burnside felt fully convinced that the rebel position in front could not be carried, and it was a military necessity either to attack the enemy or retire. A repulse would have been disastrous to the National arms, under the then existing circumstances. The army was withdrawn at night without the knowledge of the rebels, and without loss either of property or men.--General Burnside's Despatch. An artillery fight took place along both banks of the river Neuse, near Whitehall, N. C., between the forces under General Foster and the rebel forces under General Evans, resulting, after an hour's firing, in the withdrawal and silence of the rebel guns.-(Doc. 73.)
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
derates were driven across the river. They fired the bridge behind them, but the flames were put out, and about four hundred of the fugitives were made prisoners, with eleven guns and a large amount of commissary stores. Evans fled through the town, re-formed his forces two miles beyond it, and commenced a retreat toward Goldsboroa, before Foster could bring up artillery to attack him. The latter pressed on toward Goldsboroa, the objective of the expedition, driving the Confederates from Whitehall, and distracting them by feints, until, near his goal, he was checked Dec. 17. by a heavy force under General G. W. Smith. He succeeded, however, in destroying the bridge of the Weldon and Wilmington railway, This was destroyed by Lieutenant George W. Graham, of the Twenty-third New York, assisted by Lieutenant B. N. Mann, of the Seventeenth Massachusetts, after several persons who had attempted the work had been picked off by sharp-shooters. over the Neuse, at that place; also severa
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
and moving only by night. After much tedious and difficult marching through the swamps, I reached a point near Whitesville on the morning of the 9th instant. The town was held by the enemy in strong force, and, finding traveling on foot consumed too much time, I determined to impress horses, and by a bold dash break through the pickets on the Lumbertown road. With this purpose in view, I left my bivouac in the swamps, and succeeded in passing unobserved until I reached the cross-road to Whitehall, which I found picketed. After satisfying myself that the picket had no reserve, we made a quick dash and captured two men without alarm, and before they became aware of our purpose I disarmed them, and after compelling them to follow me for about five miles I paroled them, leaving them apparently much satisfied at their release. They were members of Company A, 51st North Carolina Infantry, and represented their regiment as being much demoralized. After hard riding night and day, I reac
the Seventeenth was merged in the larger organization of the Sixteenth; hence, the Seventeenth Corps, in 1865, consisted of the three divisions then marching with Sherman north ward through the Carolinas. Eighteenth Corps. Kinston Whitehall Goldsboro Siege of Washington (N. C.); Siege of Suffolk Quaker Bridge Gum Swamp Bachelor's Creek Winton Port Walthall Arrowfield Church Drewry's Bluff Bermuda Hundred Cold Harbor assault on Petersburg, June 15th Mine Explosion Pet. There were, also, twelve regiments of nine-months men--six of them from Massachusetts, and six from Pennsylvania--whose terms of enlistment expired in the summer of 1863. Some of these nile months regiments had fought creditably at Kinston, Whitehall, and Goldsboro, in Deceimber, 1862, the same month in which the corps was organized. In February, 1863, the roster showed five divisions, commanded respectively by Generals Palmer, Naglee, Ferry, Wessells, and Prince, with General J. G. Fost
y wounded. 74 Goldsboro, N. C. 2 Petersburg, Va. (assault) 11 Walthal Junction, Va. 5 Petersburg Trenches, Va. 11 Arrowfield Church, Va. 18 Picket, N. C. (1862) 1 Proctor's Creek, Va. 2     Present, also, at Kinston, N. C.; Whitehall, N. C.; Wise's Forks, N. C. notes.--Recruited in Worcester county, and left the State November 1, 1861. It went to Annapolis, and thence with the Burnside expedition to North Carolina, arriving at Hatteras Inlet on February 6, 1862. It was in N. C. 9 New Market Road, Va., Oct. 7, 1864 4 Kinston, N. C. 34 Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 13, 1864 9 St. Augustine, Fla. 1 Hatcher's Run, Va. 2 Drewry's Bluff, Va. 10 Fort Gregg, Va. 21 Deep Bottom, Va. 17     Present, also, at Whitehall; Seabrook Island; Siege of Charleston; Walthall Junction; Bermuda Hundred; Strawberry Plains; Laurel Hill Church; Johnson's Plantation; Appomattox. notes.--Recruited in various counties. It left the State November 1, 1861, and proceeded to <
eys's Fifth 20 145 19 184 131st Pennsylvania Humphreys's Fifth 22 138 15 175 20th Massachusetts Howard's Second 25 138 -- 163 81st Pennsylvania Hancock's Second 15 141 20 176 26th New York Gibbon's First 23 136 11 170 5th Penn. Reserves Meade's First 18 87 61 166 13th Penn. Reserves Meade's First 19 113 29 161 53d Pennsylvania Hancock's Second 21 133 1 155 7th Rhode Island Sturgis's Ninth 11 132 15 158 28th Massachusetts Hancock's Second 14 124 20 158 Kinston, Whitehall and Goldsboro, N. C.             Dec. 14 17, 1862.             10th Connecticut Foster's ---------- 11 89 -- 100 45th Massachusetts Foster's ---------- 18 59 -- 77 9th New Jersey Foster's ---------- 5 86 4 95 103d Pennsylvania Peck's ---------- 16 53 -- 69 23d Massachusetts Foster's ---------- 12 55 -- 67 Chickasaw Bayou, Miss.             Dec. 27-29, 1862.             16th Ohio Morgan's ---------- 16 101 194 311 54th Indiana Morgan's --------
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
n, Antietam, and Shepherdstown.Maryland Campaign, Md 1,886 9,348 1,367 12,601 Sept. 14-17 Munfordville, Ky 40 211 -- 251 Sept. 19 Iuka, Miss 86 408 199 693 Oct. 3-5 Includes loss at Hatchie River, October 5th.Corinth, Miss 505 2,150 2,183 4,838 Oct. 8 Chaplin Hills, Ky 510 2,635 251 3,396 Oct. 22 Pocotaligo, S. C 21 124 18 163 Dec. 5 Coffeeville, Miss 7 43 10 60 Dec. 7 Hartsville, Tenn 21 104 14 139 Dec. 7 Prairie Grove, Ark 164 817 -- 981 Dec. 12-17 Kinston, Whitehall, N. C 71 268 400 739 Dec. 13 Fredericksburg, Va 596 4,068 651 5,315 Dec. 26-29 Chickasaw Bluffs, Miss 57 120 10 187 Dec. 31 Stone's River, Tenn 1,294 7,945 1,027 10,266 1863.             Jan. 2-11 Springfield; Hartsville, Mo 32 201 29 262 Jan. 30 Deserted House, Va 8 31 -- 39 March 5 Thompson's Station, Tenn 56 289 12 357 March 17 Kelly's Ford, Va 11 88 34 133 May 1 Magnolia Hills, Miss 68 380 384 832 May 1-4 Chancellorsville, Va 1,665 9,081 2,018 12,764 Ma<
iately signalized several gunboats to get under way. The schooner, in the mean time, having been left to its fate, was taken in tow by the Northampton, (the name of the rebel gunboat,) and made off with toward Craney Island. The crew of the schooner, on finding themselves in such close proximity to gunpowder, lowered the lifeboat, and in that rowed back to Newport News for dear life. The United States gunboats Morse, Delaware, Louisiana, Captain Murray; Lockwood, Captain E. W. Graves; Whitehall, Captain Balsier; Narraganset, and Young America, Captain Hamilton, were sent in pursuit of the rebel marauder. The rebel gunboat Wm. Selden now came to assist the Northampton, and both of them made a stand for a few minutes. The schooner, however, was still kept in tow, and in that position our boats opened fire on the rebels. The shots were returned, but the daring rebel crafts darted off and were soon after under the guns of the batteries at Sewall's Point. Our gunboats then opene
and transported my sick and wounded men from Whitehall and Kinston, bringing them all safely to thi morning, arriving at the scene of action at Whitehall, about eleven o'clock A. M. on Tuesday morniteadiness and gallantry. In the action at Whitehall, on the sixteenth, my brigade being in advan, proceeded to the head of the column. At Whitehall we came under the fire of the enemy's skirminding that they could not cross the river at Whitehall, and knowing the enemy to be in force on thebattalion of cavalry and two guns swept past Whitehall, and went rapidly on to Mount Olive Station,the Federal column commenced their return to Whitehall, Gen. Pettigrew's brigade, with artillery at nine o'clock, our advance felt the enemy at Whitehall, who retired across the river, burned the brs lost two killed and about forty wounded at Whitehall, and the Seventeenth Massachusetts lost fourhead, and told the beginning of the fight at Whitehall, (or Jericho as it is sometimes called.) The[14 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...