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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1860., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 5, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Warrenton (North Carolina, United States) or search for Warrenton (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 45: March through the Carolinas; the Battle of Bentonville; Johnston's surrender (search)
fidential order, which itself showed plainly that he and Grant had put their heads together for new work. Monday, April 10th, was designated for the end of the preparation, and we were speedily stripping and preparing for a new base. We were to thrust ourselves, if possible, between Joe Johnston, now west of the Neuse, and General Lee. Our new base was to be along the Chowan River, with depots at such places as Winton and Murfreesboro, N. C. Our first objectives of any importance were Warrenton and Weldon, N. C., with a view to the prompt crossing of the Roanoke. Sherman carefully laid out the routes for each army, the left wing, substantially, to go by the railway toward Raleigh to Smithfield, thence to the crossing of the Neuse, the northern branch, and thence on to Warrenton; the right wing for a time along the Weldon road as far as Nahunta, and thence leftward to Pearce's Mill, and so northward to Warrenton. Schofield's army was to take a central route, passing by Whitle
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 59: institutions of the higher grade; the Barry Farm (search)
in the work and enterprise of Rev. Dr. H. M. Tupper (who was an enlisted Christian soldier during the last three years of the Civil War). He was the first President. It is a large thriving university. In 1869 it had 70 students and four teachers. In 1904 the governmentt (Department of Education) recorded 499 students and 35 instructors. Its departments of medicine and pharmacy place its medical work abreast of Howard University. 21. The Normal School under the Friends' control at Warrenton, N. C., had two teachers and 50 pupils in 1869. The Shiloh Institute appears to have replaced it, having four teachers and 95 pupils in 1896. 22. The Normal and Manual Labor School just beginning in 1869 at Tougaloo, Miss., soon became the Tougaloo University, under the patronage of the American Missionary Association. I remember to have given this school an impulse at the start by a special appropriation. It is finely located, a few miles north of the capital of the State. The universi