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The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
Captain C. A. Boutelle, in the Coast Survey steamer Vixen, with the gun-boats Pawnee, Ottawa, Pembina, Curlew, and Seneca, crossed the bar and went far enough in to have a good view of the faces and embrasures of the earth-works that we were soon to engage, the one on Hilton Head known as Fort Walker and the other on Bay Point as Fort Beauregard. On Nov. 15th, 1861, General T. W. Sherman changed the name of Fort Walker to Fort Welles (after Secretary Welles), and of Fort Beauregard to Fort Seward (after the Secretary of State). After the surveying steamer had planted some buoys, to serve as general guides, the four gun-boats last named anchored in the channel some distance apart, as additional guides, the one farthest in being Sloop of War Vandalia, rear ship of the line at Port Royal. From a War-time sketch. some three miles from Fort Beauregard, the Vixen and the Pawnee going out to pilot the vessels across the bar. This was done without delay; all of them that came in ha
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 70: D. L. Moody on board the Spree; Spanish War, 1898; Lincoln Memorial University; conclusion (search)
mps of the volunteer soldiers and witness for the Master as best we could. We met early in May and took counsel together. From the American Tract Society we obtained important booklets, Cromwell's Bible, and other publications for distribution. The religious newspapers, especially the Christian Herald, aided us with weekly papers. From other sources we obtained dailies in abundance. After we had laid in an ample supply for the camps then existing, for example, Camp Alger in Virginia, Camp Thomas at Chickamauga, the encampments at Jacksonville and Tampa, Fla., and Mobile, Ala., we went together first to Camp Alger. At each camp we found that our young men had already given and pitched a large tent called The Pavilion. It was well supplied with tables, chairs, and desks. Plenty of headed paper with envelopes was provided for the soldiers. Here was piled up for their use abundance of books and booklets. A young man well selected by the Y. M. C. A., sometimes with one or two a
, Aug. 26, 1862. Discharged, Dec. 22, 1863. Carpenter, Edward E. Residence at Attleborough, Mass., at time of enlistment. First Sergeant, 3d R. I. Heavy Artillery, Oct. 5, 1861. Re-enlisted in 3d R. I. Heavy Artillery, Jan. 20, 1864. Second Lieutenant, Mar. 28, 1865. First Lieutenant, May 13, 1865. Mustered out, June 9, 1865. Carpenter, George. Residence at Seekonk, Mass., at time of enlistment. First Lieutenant, 3d R. I. Heavy Artillery, Oct. 9, 1861. Died of disease at Fort Seward, Bay Point, S. C., June 28, 1862. Carr, James H. Private, 34th Mass. Infantry, July 31, 1862. Second Lieutenant, 11th N. J. Infantry, June 21, 1863. First Lieutenant, July 3, 1863; mustered, Jan. 18, 1864. Mustered out, June 13, 1865. Carter, Solon Augustus. Born in Massachusetts. Captain, 14th N. H. Infantry, Sept. 22, 1862. Captain, Assistant Adj. General, U. S. Volunteers, July 15, 1864. See U. S. Army. Cartwright, Charles E. Residence in Massachusetts at time of
enced, and as it progressed the companies were marched from Camp Chase to Columbus, furnished with new clothing and paid off. The companies were then ordered to Camp Thomas where the new regiments were to encamp preparatory to leaving for the Indian territories. The men were not disposed to remain in camp under this new military rtanding against trees, or in a fence corner, and the guards gone. A few days since one of the companies was paid, clothed, &c., and started in the direction of Camp Thomas, but upon arriving at the crossroads--one leading to Camp Thomas and the other to Camp Chase — they positively refused to obey the order to move northward, and,Camp Thomas and the other to Camp Chase — they positively refused to obey the order to move northward, and, with a yell and a bound, broke ranks and went southward to Camp Chase, leaving the Captain and two Lieutenants in the middle of the street to bereave their departed authority. Gen. Wallace immediately dispatched Provost Guard company in pursuit, but the deserters turned upon the guard, and, with boulder stones and clubs, drov