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Seventy-second New York was sent to construct intrenchments at Budd's ferry, opposite the Confederate battery at Shipping point, and to report on the Confederate batteries along the Potomac; he also constructed earthworks for batteries opposite Evansport. On the 28th the Confederate battery near Budd's ferry, numbering some 14 guns, opened on a steamer attempting to pass up the river. General Hooker, learning of this, directed his batteries on the Maryland shore to open on the Confederate ste of the government was invited to these successful affairs by General Johnston. Skirmishes followed, of like character, near Dranesville on the 26th, near Fairfax on the 27th, and at Annandale, December 2d. Gen. S. G. French, stationed at Evansport, reported on December 15th that his position had been under fire from Federal batteries on the Maryland shore during the past three weeks. On December 20th Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, with a force comprising the Eleventh Virginia, Col. Samuel Garl
onel of the First regiment of rifles of that city. During the early operations in Charleston harbor, he was in command at Castle Pinckney, and later on Morris island. On account of some disagreement about the admission of his regiment to the Confederate service, he went to Richmond and enlisted in the Hampton legion, but in May, 1861, received a commission as colonel of the Twenty-second North Carolina infantry. With this regiment he was engaged in constructing and guarding batteries at Evansport, on the Potomac, until the spring of 1862. He was then, without solicitation and over his objections, promoted brigadier-general, and assigned to a brigade which he led to the peninsula. At the battle of Seven Pines, July 1st, in which his brigade lost heavily, he was severely wounded in the shoulder, and while lying unconscious on the field was captured. He was confined as a prisoner two months, during which he asked that his rank might be reduced so that he could be more easily exchan
h attention, being known to have among its captains a grandson of the immortal Davy Crockett, and Capt. Donelson McGregor, who was reared near the Hermitage, and was grand-nephew of the beloved wife of Old Hickory. The regiment was stationed at Aquia creek, near Fredericksburg, in the brigade of Gen. T. H. Holmes, and was led by him into the battle of First Manassas, in which it participated late in the day, supporting Capt. Lindsay Walker's battery of artillery. It was then stationed at Evansport, where the men of the regiment, under Capt. Will H. Martin, made a daring but unsuccessful attempt to capture the Federal gunboat Pocahontas, on the Potomac. The regiment was ordered thence to Corinth, and took part in the bloody battle of Shiloh. J. M. Harrell, of Little Rock, who was then holding the State office of solicitor-general, was a volunteer aide-de-camp on General Holmes' staff at First Manassas. The Second Arkansas infantry (Confederate) was organized through the energy of
kard and Alfred C. Wood; Lieut.-Col. James A. Brown, and Majs. George W. Taylor and Mickleberry P. Terrell. Extracts from official war Records. Vol. Iv—(416) Commanded by Col. Thomas J. Judge; brigaded with other Alabama regiments under Gen. L. P. Walker, September, 1861. Vol. V—(938) Assigned to the Potomac district, special orders, No. 206, November 5, 1861. (954) Left Richmond November 14th for Fredericksburg and Manassas. (1012) Mentioned by Gen. S. D. French in report from Evansport, December 30th. (1013) Mentioned in General Holmes' letter from Brooks' Station, December 31st. (1018) Spoken of again by same, January 2, 1862. (1020) Ordered by secretary of war, January 5, 1862, to Richmond, to regain their strength after going through the usual camp diseases. (1035) F. H. Holmes writes: The regiment has suffered greatly from measles. Vol. Ix—(379) Mentioned by General McClellan. Vol. XI, Part 1—(309) Mentioned in Gen. Winfield S. Hancock's
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
n French and appointed him chief of ordnance in the army of Mississippi. The work of obtaining arms and munitions of war was a difficult one, but Captain French with untiring energy accomplished the arduous task. In April, 1861, he was appointed major of artillery, and, in October, President Davis sent him a dispatch asking him to accept the position of brigadier-general. On the 23d of October he received his commission, and from November 14, 1861, to March 8, 1862, he had command at Evansport, Va., blockading the Potomac river. On March 14th he was sent to relieve Gen. L. O'B. Branch at New Bern, N. C. Kinston and Wilmington were also in his department. On July 17, 1862, he was assigned to command of the department of southern Virginia and North Carolina, with headquarters at Petersburg. May 28, 1863, he was ordered to report to Gen. Joseph E. Johnston at Jackson, Miss. There was much discouragement at that time in the Southwest on account of Pemberton's disastrous defeats
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
quantities of powder were also received through the blockade from Wilmington to Galveston, some of it of very inferior quality. The great quantity of artillery placed in position from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, required a vast supply of powder (there was no immediate want of projectiles) to furnish even the scant allowance of fifty rounds to each gun. I think we may safely estimate that on the 1st of January, 1862, there were 1,500 sea coast guns of various calibres in position, from Evansport on the Potomac to Fort Brown on the Rio Grande. If we average their calibre at thirty-two pounders, and the charge at five pounds, it will at forty rounds per gun, give us 600,000 pounds of powder for these. The field-artillery—say 300 guns—with 200 rounds to the piece, would require, say 125,000 pounds, and the small arm cartridges, 10,000,000, would consume 125,000 pounds more—making in all 850,000 pounds. If we deduct 250,000 pounds, supposed to be on hand, in various shapes, at the b<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
quantities of powder were also received through the blockade from Wilmington to Galveston, some of it of very inferior quality. The great quantity of artillery placed in position from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, required a vast supply of powder (there was no immediate want of projectiles) to furnish even the scant allowance of fifty rounds to each gun. I think we may safely estimate that on the 1st of January, 1862, there were 1,500 sea coast guns of various calibres in position, from Evansport on the Potomac to Fort Brown on the Rio Grande. If we average their calibre at thirty-two pounders, and the charge at five pounds, it will at forty rounds per gun, give us 600,000 pounds of powder for these. The field-artillery—say 300 guns—with 200 rounds to the piece, would require, say 125,000 pounds, and the small arm cartridges, 10,000,000, would consume 125,000 pounds more—making in all 850,000 pounds. If we deduct 250,000 pounds, supposed to be on hand, in various shapes, at the b<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
neral Theophilus H. Holmes, and was first stationed at Brooks' station near Acquia creek. Soon, however, it marched to Evansport, a point on the Potomac river, the present Quantico station, between the Chappawansic and Quantico creeks, where battere gauntlet from time to time, among others the steam sloop of war Pensacola, which passed at night. While on duty at Evansport, about the middle of October, 1861, the following roster of the line officers of the regiment, with the dates of their 22d. He was then little more than a boy. Until March 2, 1862, the regiment remained in support of the batteries at Evansport, in brigade at different times with the 1st Arkansas, the 2d Tennessee, a Virginia regiment, and perhaps other regimenty few. Company I had several men wounded by the bursting of a forty-two-pounder gun in Battery No. 2. While on duty at Evansport, Colonel Pettigrew was promoted brigadier-general, but feeling that his services were of more value in furthering the r
Cannonading. --On Thursday afternoon last heavy cannonading was heard at Fredericksburg, and supposed to proceed from the locality of Evansport, on the Potomac, about twenty-five miles above Aquia Creek. The Herald says: A gentleman from about a mile above Evansport says he saw seven shots fired. He thinks they were from a boat howitzer, and evidently in the direction of a farm house — His opinion is that the firing was at private residences along the Potomac! It has been sur A gentleman from about a mile above Evansport says he saw seven shots fired. He thinks they were from a boat howitzer, and evidently in the direction of a farm house — His opinion is that the firing was at private residences along the Potomac! It has been surmised here that the firing was higher up, and the opinion is expressed that it must have been in the vicinity of Alexandria or Arlington Heights. As many as seventy distinct reports were counted at the camp near Chapawamsic
An engraver on wood. --For the benefit of the public, and especially that portion who are bent on issuing shinplasters, we state that First Lieutenant J. W. Torseh, of the Maryland Zouaves, now stationed at Camp Clifton, near Evansport, is a fine engraver of wood cuts. He is one of the artists who formerly furnished some of the most finished work of that kind for Harper's Magazine, and is capable of engraving plates which would make our small notes bear some likeness to money, instead of being, as many of them are now, mere sheets of printed paper, easily counterfeited by anybody. While we recognize the necessity for small notes, we are not disposed to encourage the circulation of shinplasters which his body can identify as genuine. As the public is circumstanced now, no one has any idea, when he receives a shinplaster, whether it is counterfeit or genuine. Some protection against worthless paper ought to be afforded to the community, and therefore we mention the fact of Lie
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