Your search returned 375 results in 131 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
The Potomac blockade — another success. We have intelligence that two schooners were captured by our forces at Evansport on Saturday last, after having been badly injured by our batteries. The cargo of one consisted of 432 bales of hay and 500 barrels of camenc and the other was laden with wood. One steaming attached to the schooners was sunk and another damaged. It was reported last evening that firing was heard in the direction of Evansport on Monday, and it is quite probable we may We have intelligence that two schooners were captured by our forces at Evansport on Saturday last, after having been badly injured by our batteries. The cargo of one consisted of 432 bales of hay and 500 barrels of camenc and the other was laden with wood. One steaming attached to the schooners was sunk and another damaged. It was reported last evening that firing was heard in the direction of Evansport on Monday, and it is quite probable we may soon have important news from that quarter.
large nor as thriving as its namesake on the coast of Scotland. The hotel was full. Even a soft plank was denied us, and we pushed through the village towards Evansport, and took refuge in a farm-house. That night we slumbered sweetly on a white oak floor. The Evansport batteries. Hitherto nothing has been known of the Evansport batteries. Hitherto nothing has been known of the important batteries that have been constructed at Evansport, and the operations were carried on in the most secret manner.--It was known that we had in process of construction some kind of works, with the view of blockading the Potomac; but the location of them was a secret. The enemy got wind of the intention, and sent steam-tugsEvansport, and the operations were carried on in the most secret manner.--It was known that we had in process of construction some kind of works, with the view of blockading the Potomac; but the location of them was a secret. The enemy got wind of the intention, and sent steam-tugs cruising up and down the shore, to examine carefully every point and headland. Whenever anything suspicious was seen, a few shots were fired as "feelers." Every spot from Mathias's Point to the Occoquon, was subjected to this test except the right one, and it singularly enough was passed by with a glance.--But few days since a st
Affairs down the Potomac. Washington, Oct. 16. --An officer of the steamer Jacob Bell, who has carefully reconnoitered the Shipping Point battery on the Potomac, says there are six guns in position, all apparently heavy ordnance. The river there is about one mile wide. Intelligent officers say that the statement that there are six miles of batteries below Shipping Point is all nonsense. Vessels might be annoyed by batteries from the shore for a mile below there, as far as Evansport; but below that point the Virginia shore recedes from the channel, and the river widens so that batteries would be useless if planted there. Sixteen or eighteen guns are about the extent of their armament thereabout, it is believed by competent judges. The steamers Pawnee, Harriet Lane, and Yankee, went down the river during last night. The steamer Anacostia has had her boilers put aboard of her, and is being rapidly fitted up. The steamer Jacob Bell has gone into dock for repai
ved several from slaves, and that, too, without hesitation or without being asked, the new blankets given them by their masters for winter use. Are not such donations more patriotic than those of the richest white men? As soon as this fact became known, the "poor, down-trodden slaves" were doubly compensated for their temporary deprivation. The news from the Potomac — injury to the Pawnee Confirmed. The Fredericksburg Recorder, of the 23d inst. says: We have advices from Evansport covering all that has happened since our last issue up to a late hour yesterday. As yet the river is not effectually closed against small crafts, many of them being of such light burthen as to be able to pass the batteries safely by running in shallow water close to the Maryland shore. No large vessel, war or merchantman has, however, attempted to lift the blockade, and we rather suspect they will hardly dare to do so single handed. But the vigilant eyes of our watchful men never permit
The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Wealth, pauperism, and crime in the North (search)
y the mountain streams, with earth from the hills, shall be recorded in another letter from this point. To study all the objects of interest would require time. There are old churches, old cemeteries, an old court-house, old jail, ancient buildings, and some rare old trees. An old mill, too, now being fitted up as a hospital, is worth being preserved by pen and pencil, and before a long time passes I hope to visit it again. For the present I must say good-bye to Dumfries and pass on to Evansport. Taking a road to the left of the town, across the run, where formerly vessels of medium size discharged their cargoes at well-built wharves, we pass down to a farm house now used as General Trimble's headquarters.--Tents have been prepared near the batteries, to which the General and his staff will soon remove. From here to the river the distance is about three and a half miles, the road passing through an unbroken line of woods until the river comes in view. To the left of the roa
The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Wealth, pauperism, and crime in the North (search)
icksburg to the immediate base of the Blue Ridge, near Fauquier White Sulphur Springs. If this were so, with its right resting on the Potomac at Aquia Creek and Evansport, its front would stretch about fifty miles. That fact shows the notion of those papers is ridiculous. Here it is well known that Manassas Junction continuest-House, their last concentration being south and west of that point to meet the posisble result of their river-blockading game. That is from the Court-House to Evansport and Aquia Creek, with but little more than a guard from the Court-House through Flint Hill, Vienna, and Leesburg, to the Potomac near the Point of Rocks. Deew battery at Timber Branch mounts four guns. The Yankee has on board a large-sized rifled shell, which was fired from the battery at Budd's Ferry, (between Evansport and Shipping Point.) It went through a barn on the Maryland shore, and penetrated several feet into a bank of earth. Horses, mules, hay, and oats. About
at 7 o'clock, having left Washington yesterday morning. Nothing very remarkable occurred on the way down to Quantico creek. At that point the steamer Pocahontas, which was some miles ahead of us, threw three or four shells into the bushes at Evansport, or Shipping Point, Va. The fire was not returned, and she proceeded on her way. As we neared the Point, at 10½ A. M., our decks were cleared for action, all hands at quarters, hatches closed and everything ready. At 10.45 they opened on us, with rifled shot and shell, from three batteries, two on the bank and one about 400 yards inland, at Evansport. These shot fell twenty rods short. The Seminole returned the fire briskly, and with effect, from her pivot gun and two medium 32-pounders. We kept on our course, returning their fire during thirty-five minutes, and receiving theirs during forty-five. We were a fine target for them — a slow steamer clear against the horizon, while they were hid in earth and bushes. We ceas
e side, in throwing shot and shell in the vicinity of Mathias Point. The timber and undergrowth may have been riddled to some extent, but no game was flushed! If there are any Confederate soldiers in that vicinity they had a gay time in listening to the salutes of regard, which the enemy proffered in such number and with such warmth of greeting, but to all of which they were stoically indifferent. Early Wednesday morning a large military force appeared on the Maryland side, opposite Evansport, intended, it is supposed, to prevent gallant Marylanders from crossing. This brigade was under the noted Gen. Dan. Sickles, a worthy officer in so worthy a cause as that of Lincoln. In the evening of Wednesday the "City of Richmond," under command of Lieut. Simms, steamed over to the Maryland side, and when within striking distance, opened fire on the camp of the enemy. Seven shells were sent into their midst, and the entire concern immediately performed "double quick" without trou
ext the batteries at Aquia Creek; and ultimately the batteries at Evansport. The Sickles Brigade are reported as part of this force, It is stated that Gen. McClellan has said the batteries at Evansport must be taken without regard to the cost. These are the main feat, in order to discover "rebel" batteries. In the vicinity of Evansport nothing of interest had transpired since our last until yesterdayare pleased to speak of them in their press reports. From Evansport and Aquia Creek. The Fredericksburg Herald, of yesterday, haso be closed to the navigation of Federal craft in the vicinity of Evansport, according to the open and frequent confessions of the enemy them, C. S. N., from off the "Richmond," shortly after her arrival at Evansport on Wednesday last; had the effect to break up the camp of the Siche Maryland shore, and opened up a fire on the lower batteries at Evansport. Her shot did not reach us, and a few fires on our part showed t
or concentration, or even for retreat, now constitute one of the most brilliant pages in the history of our new Republic. For these services he was soon appointed a Brigadier General in the Provisional Army, and subsequently, when he arrived in Richmond, was made a Major General, and assigned to a command in the army of the Potomac. In this army he ranks next to Gen. Beauregard. If the enemy should make his threatened attack on our right, with the object of carrying our batteries at Evansport and reopening the navigation of the Potomac, General Van-Dorn's Division will be the first engaged, and will probably have to sustain the brunt of the battle. As soon as he arrived here and assumed command of his division, he made himself thoroughly acquainted with the topography of the country by a series of personal inspections, which he carried through without the slightest regard to roads, winds, or weather. I venture to say, that, if the enemy give him one chance at them, they will
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...