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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Going to the front: recollections of a private — I. (search)
outed, Keep back, men, or I shoot! This movement, which I saw myself, was gallantly executed, and was perfectly successful. The mob recoiled like water from a rock. One of the leading rioters, then a young man, now a peaceful merchant, tried, as he has himself told me, to pass the line, but the marshal seized him, and vowed he would shoot if the attempt was made. This nearly ended the fight, and the column passed on under the protection of the police, without serious molestation, to Camden station Sumner H. Needham, of Lawrence, Addison O. Whitney and Luther C. Ladd, of Lowell, and Charles A. Taylor were the killed, and thirty-six of their comrades were wounded. Twelve citizens were killed, and an unknown number were wounded. Col. Jones continues: As the men went into the cars I caused the blinds to the cars to be closed, and took every precaution to prevent any shadow of offense to the people of Baltimore; but still the stones flew thick and fast into the train, and it was
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
oners, but found that the Marshal of Police had already gone to Camden station, where he had concentrated his men by request of the railroad authorities. The Mayor at once followed him to Camden station, and on arriving there found him posted with his men prepared to put down any attack. Unfortunately the mob had gathered not at Camden station but on Pratt street, at a point a short distance west of the depot where the tthis stage of the proceedings Mayor Brown, who had hurried from Camden Station, arrived on the scene. What followed is best given in Mayor Brored that the troops had decided to go by a different route to Camden station. A portion of the rioters at once started to head them off, whd from the mob. At Howard street a strong force of rioters from Camden station met the troops and refused to yield. The soldiers fired again way. The soldiers again started at the double quick and reached Camden station without further trouble. Thirteen cars were drawn out, and the
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 43: visit to New Orleans and admission to Fortress Monroe. (search)
and determined, if possible, to obtain his aid in securing her husband's release. In this respect, she could not have selected a more influential person to accomplish her end. Mr. Garrett and Mr. Stanton were always warm personal friends. President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton expressed in the warmest terms their appreciation of the aid which he had often rendered them. Upon one occasion, Mr. Garrett said, Charles W. Russell, formerly of Wheeling, Va., came to my office at Camden Station and sent in his card. Being at the moment very much engaged, I detained him for an hour, but hastened to see Mr. Russell as soon as I could, and to my astonishment found him accompanied with a lady who was closely veiled, and who was the wife of Jefferson Davis. After assuring them that I had not known any lady was waiting, I asked the occasion of Mrs. Davis's visit. She replied that she had just arrived from Fortress Monroe, where her husband was so closely confined that unless he co
r hour. The Mayor and Police Commissioners, with two hundred police, crossed in a ferry-boat to Locust Point, and were present at the debarkation. The Harriet Lane stood off the point with her ports open. The transfer to the cars was accomplished without much difficulty, and there was no excitement other than that which proceeded from the curiosity of the people to witness the proceedings. The track from Locust Point skirts the lower part of the city, and joins the main stem near Camden Station.--N. Y. Tribune, May 10. The Richmond Whig says: We beg to suggest to all Southern papers the propriety of omitting all mention of the movement of troops within our borders. A word to the wise. The caution is a good one, and might well be extended to correspondents, both private and public, by telegraph and by mail. The caution is the more necessary, because of our large daily correspondence with the people of the North, with whom we are unfortunately at war. --New Orleans Pica
fired, and then other shots, and one man in the front section fell dead. Thereupon the officer in command gave the order to fire. Then, when the way was partially cleared, the movement was increased to quick step. Up to this time the mob evidently thought that the troops had no pistols and no ammunition in their guns. The firing finally became general. Six of our men were killed and thirty were wounded. The band, which was in the rear, had been cut off when the troops arrived at Camden station. The first intimation that Colonel Jones received of trouble of any sort was by a man reporting to a government official who stood beside him, that there was trouble with the troops. The next report was that the troops were firing upon the citizens; and immediately the head of the attacked column appeared at the station. The first inclination in Colonel Jones' mind was to form his men and march out into the square adjoining the station, which was now filled with an infuriated mob, a
South streets. Several of the citizens fell, but, undismayed, they pressed the soldiers with an incessant and heavy volley of stones. The troops were unable to withstand the gathering crowd; they were bewildered by their mode of attack; they pressed along the streets confused and staggering, breaking into a run whenever there was an opportunity to do so, and turning at intervals to fire upon the citizens who pursued them. Harassed and almost exhausted, the troops at length reached Camden station. But here the fight continued without intermission; stones were hurled into the cars with such violence that the windows and panelling were shattered ; the soldiers' faces and bodies were streaming with blood, and they could only protect themselves by lying down or stooping below the windows. Taunts clothed in the most fearful language, were hurled at them; men pressed up to the windows of the car, presenting knives and revolvers, and cursing up in the faces of the soldiers; and for ha
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
hence it was the custom of the railroad company to haul each car across the city, over a track laid in the street, to Camden station of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, a distance of a little over a mile. Nine cars with seven companies got through to Camden station. But that was as much as human nature could bear. The mob of infuriated men increased every minute and the excitement grew. The stones out of the street flew up and staved in the car windows. The drivers unhitched their teams, hitcent. These men were marched out of the station, formed in front of it, and then moved in a column of fours. toward Camden station. In the meantime the railroad track had been torn up, the bridge on the south dismantled and obstructed, and the mar of Baltimore in front, the chief of police in rear, the baited, harried, breathless preservers of the Union reached Camden station, where they were loaded on trains and dispatched, panic-stricken, to Washington. Outside the city limits, however,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
, and the volunteers went down Howard street to Camden Station. Not finding a train there, they continued on tt, along Pratt to Howard street, and thence to Camden Station. Along this route was the scene of the riot. ril. Six cars, drawn rapidly by horses, reached Camden Station, the first carload being received with jeers anes and hoots and yells of defiance. March to Camden Station. There were now at President Street Station resident street and began their famous march to Camden Station. As they marched up President street the commof the city, Mr. George M. Gill, rode rapidly to Camden Station in a carriage. It was thought that the disturb the soldiers, under police protection, reached Camden Station without further damage. In the battle four sol. The embarkation of the troops in the cars in Camden Station was attended by an angry demonstration, and onlrce under his command. When the troops reached Camden Station 130 were missing. Robert W. Davis killed.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
, and the volunteers went down Howard street to Camden Station. Not finding a train there, they continued on tt, along Pratt to Howard street, and thence to Camden Station. Along this route was the scene of the riot. ril. Six cars, drawn rapidly by horses, reached Camden Station, the first carload being received with jeers anes and hoots and yells of defiance. March to Camden Station. There were now at President Street Station resident street and began their famous march to Camden Station. As they marched up President street the commof the city, Mr. George M. Gill, rode rapidly to Camden Station in a carriage. It was thought that the disturb the soldiers, under police protection, reached Camden Station without further damage. In the battle four sol. The embarkation of the troops in the cars in Camden Station was attended by an angry demonstration, and onlrce under his command. When the troops reached Camden Station 130 were missing. Robert W. Davis killed.
th, D. B. Tyler. Besides these it is said that some twenty-five were so badly wounded that after they reached Washington it was found necessary to place them under the care of surgeons. Police man Staylor, who passed through the cars at Camden station, states that a large number had their heads bandaged and many of them bled profusely. The jury of inquest over the body of Mr. Robert W. Davis, rendered the following verdict: "The jury find, from the evidence, that Ro. W. Davis was ruthlessly murdered while enjoying the privilege of a peaceable and quiet citizen, by a musket ball penetrating his left side, fired from the third from the last car that took the troops from Baltimore to Washington, that left Camden Station at 1 o'clock P. M., on the 19th instant; they further find that the shot was fired by one of the military." The funeral of Mr. Davis took place yesterday afternoon, at three o'clock, at St. Paul's burying ground, the service being conducted by Rev. D
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