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The Daily Dispatch: August 22, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 2 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ce, I propose now merely to report in general terms the state of affairs for the information of the lieutenant-general commanding the armies of the United States. Having made my orders at Nashville for the concentration of the Armies of the Cumberland, Ohio, and Tennessee at and near Chattanooga by May 5, according to the programme of Lieutenant-General Grant, I repaired to Chattanooga in person on the 29th of April, and remained there until May 6, by which date General Thomas had grouped his air colors. By order of Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman: L. M. Dayton, Aide-de-Camp. Special field orders, No. 68. Hdqrs. Mil. Div. of the Miss., In the Field, Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864. The officers and soldiers of the Armies of the Cumberland, Ohio, and Tennessee have already received the thanks of the nation through its President and Commander-in-Chief, and it now remains only for him who has been with you from the beginning, and who intends to stay all the time, to thank the officer
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
tions. Indeed, for being less dangerous than a distant invasion, that which assails an adjacent power has also none the less its fatal chances. A French army which should go to attack Cadiz could, although well based upon the Pyrenees, with intermediate bases on the Ebro and the Tagus, find a tomb on the Guadalquivir. In the same manner, that which in 1809 besieged Komorn in the centre of Hungary, whilst others were warring from Barcelona to Oporto, might have succumbed in the plains of Wagram, without having any need of going so far as the Beresina. The antecedents, the number of disposable troops, the successes already gained, the state of the country, all have an influence upon the latitude which may be given to one's enterprises; the great talent of the general will be to proportion them to his means and to circumstances. With regard to the part which policy might exercise in those neighboring invasions, if it be true that it is less indispensable than in remote incursions,
want, until by and by I suppose I shall be so insatiable as to think I cannot do with less than the whole State of Virginia. The storm has entirely changed the weather, and I am afraid may affect the health of the men for a few days; for it is now cold and wet. The review of yesterday passed off very well; it was a superb display, by far the finest ever seen on this continent, and rarely equalled anywhere There were 104 guns in the review (a number greater than Lauriston's famous battery at Wagram) and 5,500 cavalry. The ground was wet, so I did not venture to let them pass at a trot or gallop; they passed only at a walk. . . I was tired out last night. My horse was young and mild, and nearly pulled my arm off. The cheering of the men made him perfectly frantic, and, as I had to keep my cap in my right hand, I had only my left to manage him. Oct. (10?). I have just time to write a very few lines before starting out. Yesterday I threw forward our right some four miles, but the
andS. Lapham'sS. LaphamReed & HuseLynn206 3081844Sch.MedfordGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerP. CookProvincetown105 309 Sch.JosephineGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerJoseph AtkinsProvincetown122 310 ShipSophia WalkerSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorWalker & BrotherBoston343 311 BarkMarySprague & James'sFoster & TaylorNathaniel FrancisBoston270 312 ShipMagnoliaSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorWilliam HammondMarblehead660 313 BrigHenricoSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorH. PaneProvincetown142 314 BarkWagramSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorWilliam HammondMarblehead242 315 BarkAzoffJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonWilliam A. ReaBoston310 316 ShipJ. Q. AdamsP. Curtis'sP. CurtisD. P. ParkerBoston684 317 ShipAlbatrossP. Curtis'sP. CurtisB. BangsBoston750 318 BarkOhioJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisFairfield, Lincoln, & Co.Boston358 319 BarkE. H. ChapinJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisJ. GandalfoNew Orleans400 320 ShipNiphonJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisJ. H. ShawNantucket337 321 ShipOxnardT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H
00 Kunnersdorf, 1759Allies, 70,00014,00031,0002720 Prussians, 43,00017,000 Torgau, 1760Prussians, 46,00012,00024,0002226 Austrians, 60,00012,000 Austerlitz, 1805French, 65,0009,00025,0001613 Allies, 83,00016,000 Eylau, 1807French, 70,00020,00042,0003328 Russians, 63,50022,000 Heilsberg, 1807Russians, 84,00010,00022,0001311 French, 85,00012,000 Friedland, 1807French, 75,00010,00034,0002313 Russians, 67,00024,000 Aspern, 1809Austrians, 75,00020,00045,0002626 French, 95,00025,000 Wagram, 1809French, 220,00022,00044,000.1110 Austrians, 150,00022,000 Borodino, 1812French, 125,00030,00075,0002824 Russians, 138,00045,000 Bautzen, 1813French, 190,00012,00024,00086 Allies, 110,00012,000 Leipsic, 1813Allies, 290,00042,00092,0002014 French, 150,00050,000 Ligny, 1815French, 73,00012,00024,0001516 Prussians, 86,00012,000 Waterloo, 1815Allies, 100,00020,00042,0002420 French, 70,00022,000 Solferino, 1859Allies, 135,00016,50031,5001011 Austrians, 160,00015,000 Koniggratz,
ng the movements of partisan forces. On the 1st of September, by direction of Fremont, he assumed command of the District of Southeast Missouri, and on the 4th, made his headquarters at Cairo, at the mouth of the Ohio. The district included not only the region from which it takes its name, but the southern part of Illinois, and so much of western Kentucky and Tennessee as might fall into the possession of national forces; it comprised the junction of the four great rivers, Tennessee, Cumberland, Ohio, and Mississippi. Grant's first act was the seizure of Paducah, at the mouth of the Tennessee. The governor of Kentucky was at this time insisting that the state should maintain a position of armed neutrality, and all Kentuckians who sympathized with the rebels, took the same ground. This neutrality had never been recognized by the United States authorities, but was first violated by General Polk, the rebel commander in that region. He seized Columbus and Hickman, on the Mississip
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
otomac would have been annihilated. Beauregard, going on the field on a bed, wasted by protracted illness, never having appreciated or sympathized with the strategy of the occasion as developed by his great commander, recalled the troops from the very arms of victory, and an assured success of the Confederacy. At Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, General Lee planned a battle that stands, as to wisdom and feasibility, second to none which the master mind of Napoleon ever conceived. Not Marengo nor Wagram, nor any other field of the twenty years of Napoleon's career, surpasses in the splendor of the military art Lee's Gettysburg, as his orders read. Longstreet, afflicted as Early told us he was, often with an intellectual and physical inertia, point blank refused to execute those orders, and the only thing to show on our side is the incomparable achievement of Pickett's division. Stuart rode around McClellan on the Chickahominy and beat back Hooker's cavalry sent to assist that chieftain'
. Waddell, J., VI., 296. Wade, Herbert T. I., 10; X., 2. Wade's battery, Confederate, I., 358. Wadsworth, J. S.: II., 230; III., 48, 49; X., 133. Wagner, G. D.: II., 274 seq.; III., 117, 260, 262, 264; X., 91. Wagner Ii., X., 296. Wagner battery V., 118. Wagon train: I., 53; at Cumberland landing, Pamunkey River, VIII., 47. Wagons: army, VIII., 40; Federal, train, from the Potomac to the Mississippi, VIII., 47; dimensions of, VIII., 47. Wagram, losses at, X., 140. Wainright, C. S., I., 295. Wainwright, J. H., IX., 346. Wainwright, J. M., VI., 316. Wainwright, R.: I., 227; VI., 188. Wait, H. L., X., 2. Waite, C. A., VII., 28. Waites, J., I., 103. Walcutt, C. C., X., 93. Waldren's Ridge, Tenn., IV., 160, 164. Waldron, Ark., II., 348. Walke, H.: I., 217, 224; VI., 16, 148, 216, 218. Walker, F. A.: IV., 272; X., 23, 24. Walker, I., I., 19. Walker, H. H.:
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1862., [Electronic resource], One hundred and twenty-five Dollars reward. (search)
er — a rare example of self-denial. No pay, no glitter of epaulets, tempted him. Lannes — Rose from the ranks to a Marshal's buton. Lanriston — From schools. Lefebvre, Marchal de France — Soldier 1773, Sergeant 1788, General 1798, Marshal 1504, died 1820. Letebvre-Desnouettes — soldier 1752; Colonel 1804, General 1806, refugee in america, drowned in the Alblon. Macdonald — Born in Jancerre, France, 1765, Lieutenant in an Irish regiment 1784; General 1795, Marshal at Wagram 1809. Marcean — Born 1769, soldier 1784, Lieutenant Colonel 1792, was arrested by representing from the army; General 1793, killed in 1795. The Austrian army solicited an armistice to attend his funeral, so highly was he estimated by all. Marmont, from the military school — Lieutenant 1774, General 1793, Marchal 1809. Massena — Well known; surnamed "Enfant cheri de la victoire; " soldier 1790, General 1793, Marshal 1804, died 1817. Moncey, Marechal de France
the campaign of Austerlitz took place, it was computed at 651,000 men. In the campaign of Jens (1806) it was somewhat larger. In the campaign of Friedland (1807) the military strength of the Empire approached 800,000 men, and in the campaign of Wagram (1809) it quite came up to that figure.--All these campaigns were eminently successful.--That of Russia(1812) was a failure, from causes not at all dependent on the strength of the invading army. The distance from home, the climate, the rugged rwas 651,000. At Jena, 126,000 French only were engaged. At Friedland 80,000 French decided the fate of the war. although there were in Poland nearly 300,000 French soldiers, while the strength of the Empire was double that figure, and more. At Wagram, 150,000 or 160,000 men fought, while Napoleon had certainly at least 800,000 men under arms on the whole. So difficult is the problem of concentration, even in the hands of the greatest genius. The Allies overwhelmed Napoleon at last by th
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