hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 14, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 29, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 262 results in 88 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Doc. 1.-the invasion of Pennsylvania. Colonel A. K. McClure's letter. Chambersburgh, Pa., October--, 1862. I have had a taste of rebel rule; and, although not so bad as it might have been, my rather moderate love of adventure would not invite a repetition of it. I reached here on Friday evening to fill several political appointments in the county; and, when I got off the cars, the telegraphic operator called me aside, and informed me that he had a report from Greencastle, of the rebels entering Mercersburgh. We agreed that it was preposterous, and thought it best not to make the report public and alarm our people needlessly. I supposed that a few cavalry had crossed the Potomac to forage somewhere on the route leading to Mercersburgh, but never, for a moment, credited their advent into that place. I came home, and after tea returned to the telegraph-office to ascertain whether the rebels had been over the Potomac at any point, and I was there met by two reliable men,
General: An expedition into Maryland with a detachment of cavalry, if it can be successfully executed, is at this time desirable. You will, therefore, form a detachment of from twelve to fifteen hundred well-mounted men, suitable for such an expedition, and should the information from your scouts lead you to suppose that your movement can be concealed from bodies of the enemy that would be able to resist it, you are desired to cross the Potomac above Williamsport, leave Hagerstown and Greencastle on your right, and proceed to the rear of Chambersburgh, and endeavor to destroy the railroad bridge over the branch of the Concoheague. Any other damage that you can inflict upon the enemy or his means of transportation you will also execute. You are desired to gain all information of the position, force, and probable intention of the enemy which you can; and in your progress into Pennsylvania you will take measures to inform yourself of the various routes that you may take on your r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's final and full report of the Pennsylvania campaign and battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ton was seriously wounded while acting with his accustomed gallantry. Robertson's and Jones' brigades arrived on the 3d July, and were stationed upon our right flank. The severe loss sustained by the army, and the reduction of its ammunition, rendered another attempt to dislodge the enemy inadvisable, and it was therefore determined to withdraw. The trains, with such of the wounded as could bear removal, were ordered to Williamsport on the 4th July, part moving through Cashtown and Greencastle, escorted by General Imboden, and the remainder by the Fairfield road. The army retained its position until dark, when it was put in motion for the Potomac by the last named route. A heavy rain continued throughout the night, and so much impeded its progress that Ewell's corps, which brought up the rear, did not leave Gettysburg until late in the forenoon of the following day. The enemy offered no serious interruption, and after an arduous march we arrived at Hagerstown in the afternoon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
oad. His withdrawal was favored by night, which set in just as we reached the ridge overlooking Williamsport. An important auxilliary to this attack was rendered by Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee, who reached the vicinity of Williamsport by the Greencastle road very opportunely, and participated in the attack with his accustomed spirit. Great credit is due the command for the fearless and determined manner in which they rushed upon the enemy and compelled him to lose his hold upon the main pomall, and the enemy being least threatening from that direction, was assigned to the north front of Hagerstown, connecting with General Jones on the right on the Cavetown road. The Maryland cavalry was ordered on the National road and towards Greencastle on a scout. On the 8th the cavalry was thrown forward towards Boonsboroa, advancing on the different roads, in order by a bold demonstration to threaten an advance upon the enemy, and thus cover the retrogade of the main body. The move was s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E. Bodes' report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
all irregularities, and being very generally and cheerfully seconded by officers and men, they succeeded satisfactorily. Some few cases of fraud, and some (at Greencastle) of violence to property — the latter traceable to the cavalry — were heard of. A few instances of forced purchases were reported, but never established. I bel on that day penetrated into the enemy's country. Iverson's brigade was the first to touch Pennsylvania soil. After a march of thirteen miles we bivouacked at Greencastle. During the night, under orders, I reported in person at the headquarters of the Lieutenant-General commanding — then at Beaver Creek, between Boonsboroa and Hal Jenkins was directly under the orders of the Lieutenant-General in effect, as the latter was thenceforth constantly with the advance guard of infantry. At Greencastle the orders of General Lee regulating the conduct of troops and officers of all departments whilst in the enemy's country were received, but they had, in substan<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General B. H. Anderson's report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ing until the following morning. As soon as all the wagons had crossed on the morning of the twentieth, the march was continued, and in the afternoon the command halted two miles beyond White Post. Moved on the twenty-first to Berryville, on the twenty-second to Roper's farm, on the road to Charlestown, and on the twenty-third to Shepherdstown. On the twenty-fourth it crossed the Potomac, and moved to Boonsboroa, on the twenty-fifth to Hagerstown, on the twenty-sixth two miles beyond Greencastle, and on the twenty-seventh through Chambersburg to Fayetteville, at which place it halted until the first of July. Soon after daylight on the first of July, in accordance with the commands of the Lieutenant-General, the division moved from Fayetteville in the direction of Cashtown — arrived at the latter place early in the afternoon, and halted for further orders. Shortly before our arrival at Cashtown, the sound of brisk cannonading near Gettysburg announced an engagement in our fr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--official reports. (search)
stown, where Jones' brigade was temporarily detached, with orders to destroy a number of canal boats and a quantity of grain and flour stored at different points, and cut the canal (Chesapeake and Ohio canal). A report of his operations and the disposition made of his captures has been forwarded. June 18th we crossed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg; thence marched via Hagerstown and Chambersburg to within three miles of Carlisle. From Greencastle, Steuart's brigade was ordered to McConnellsburg to collect horses, cattle and other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in time, however, to participate in the action of the 1st instant. The last day's march was twenty-five
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
thing we wanted, and at my request she went herself and gave her vegetables away. I had her name in a little memorandum book, where I jotted down daily occurrences, but it has passed away from my memory. While in camp I heard that General Ewell was in Carlisle and York, and had gone, or portions of his command had, towards Harrisburg, and had marched where he pleased without opposition. On the 30th June my command was put in march towards Gettysburg, and camped, I think, at or near Greencastle, receiving orders to march the next day. We had heard the day before or heard it here that Ewell's corps had been ordered to return to the main command, because General Lee had been informed that the Federal army had crossed the Potomac, and was marching northward. And before moving, on the first, I received orders to follow in rear of Johnson's division of Ewell's corps, which had been detached from the corps to conduct Ewell's trains west of the mountains, while the rest of the corp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
lle road. His withdrawal was favored by night, which set in just as we reached the ridge overlooking Williamsport. An important auxiliary to this attack was rendered by Brigadier-General Lee, who reached the vicinity of Williamsport by the Greencastle road very opportunely, and participated in the attack with his accustomed spirit. Great credit is due the command for the fearless and determined manner in which they rushed upon the enemy, and compelled him to loose his hold upon the main small and the enemy being least threatening from that direction, was assigned to the north front of Hagerstown, connecting with General Jones on the right on the Cavetown road. The Maryland cavalry was ordered on the National road and towards Greencastle on a scout. On the 8th the cavalry was thrown for-ward towards Boonsboroa, advancing on the different roads in order, by a bold demonstration to threaten an advance upon the enemy. and thus cover the retrograde of the main body. The move wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg--report of General Junius Daniel. (search)
tskirts of the town, I rode forward and learned that the enemy had fled, and received orders from the Major-General Commanding to return with my command and go into camp at the Big Spring. The following day we marched upon Williamsport, which place we reached about dark and went into camp just opposite the town. On the 17th we crossed the river and encamped on the Sharpsburg road. On the 19th we marched upon Hagerstown and remained in camp there until 22d, when we marched upon Greencastle, Pennsylvania, and camped a little south of the town and remained until the 24th, when we marched upon Chambersburg, reaching that place about the middle of the day. At twelve o'clock at night I received orders to move with my brigade to Shippensburg, as General Jenkins was threatened by the enemy. I commenced the march about one o'clock and arrived there about 5 A. M., and relieved General Jenkins in command. On the 26th the remainder of the division came up. On the following day we marched u
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...