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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
M. the enemy, warned by their heavy losses of the morning against assaulting in column in face of artillery served with such rapidity and precision, advanced at a charging pace in line, and after a spirited contest carried with a rush the whole line of redans from 5 to 9 inclusive. Scarcely had the assault ended, when Hancock came up with the Second corps, and though the ranking officer, with rare generosity, which recalls the chivalric conduct of Sir James Outram to Havelock in front of Lucknow, Outram's Divisional Order on night of September 16th, 1857--Brock's Life of Havelock, p. 213. at once offered his troops to Smith, and stood ready to receive the orders of his subordinate. The prize was now within his grasp had he boldly advanced — and the moon shining brightly highly favored such enterprise — but Smith, it would seem, though possessed of considerable professional skill, was not endowed with that intuitive sagacity which swiftly discerns the chances of the moment,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
e trotting up the road, sounding the advance, and behind him came the skirmishers of Ramseur's Division with rapid strides. Just then the artillerists saw through the smoke the broad, white slouch hat and the black feather of Old Jube, who rode amongst them, and looking toward the enemy, exclaimed: No buttermilk rangers after you now, damn you, an expression not to be found in tactics, but of a kind sometimes mixed with gunpowder. Poor Tinsley! his last bugle call, like the bagpipes of Lucknow, foretold the rescue of Lynchburg; but on that field he found in a soldier's duty and with a soldier's glory, a soldier's death. Zzzwater and a good rest. On the afternoon of the 18th, Hunter, with his cavalry on each wing, his two infantry divisions and his artillery in the centre, advanced to the assault, but the attack was feeble and quickly repulsed, and Hunter's career was over. Rodes's Division arrived that afternoon from Charlottesville, and, though the artillery had not yet