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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 6 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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gold in the legislative halls of every free Northern State. Here it is An unconstitutional decision of a judge is no authority; and even if confirmed by the highest judiciary in the land, namely, the Supreme Court of the United States, it would still be no authority: no law which any one of the States would be bound to recognize. An unconstitutional law is no law--it is Null and Void--and the same is true of a judge's decision given against the supreme law. Can any good come out of Nazareth? Undoubtedly! There is a gospel of freedom in that one Southern word — Nullification! Is slavery a local institution. It does not suit the South now to admit that slavery is a local institution. It is national, and a blessing now, and claims, the protection of national institutions. It may be well, therefore, to remind the South of her old opinions. Read what Governor Wilson said in his message to the South Carolina legislature — opinions which were enthusiastically indorsed by th
ived altogether in vain. I can trust God with both the time and the manner of my death, believing, as I now do, that for me at this time to seal my testimony (for God and humanity) with my blood, will do vastly more toward advancing the cause I have earnestly endeavored to promote, than all I have done in my life before. I beg of you all meekly and quietly to submit to this; not feeling your-selves in the least degraded on that account. Remember, dear wife and children all, that Jesus of Nazareth suffered a most excruciating death on the cross as a felon, under the most aggravating circumstances. Think, also, of the prophets, and apostles, and Christians of former days, who went through greater tribulations than you or I; and (try to) be reconciled. May God Almighty comfort all your hearts, and soon wipe away all tears from your eyes. To Him be endless praise. Think, too, of the crushed millions who have no comforter. I charge you all never (in your trials) to forget the griefs
42. let us alone. by William H. Burleigh. And in the synagogue there was a man, which had a spirit of an unclean devil, and cried out with a loud voice, Saving, Let us alone; what have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come to destroy us?--Luke IV. 33, 34. And when he was come to the other side into the country of the Gergesenes, there met him two possessed with devils, coming out of the tombs, exceeding fierce, so that no man night come by that way. And behold, they cried out, saying, What have we to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God? art thou come hither to torment us before the time?--Matthew VIII. 28, 29. All that we ask, is to be let alone.--Jeff. Davis. “let us alone!” the unclean spirits cried-- “Why com'st thou to torment us ere the time?” “Let us alone!” still adding crime to crime, Shrieks the arch-traitor and Liberticide, Who, drunk with hate, his country hath defied, And, with confederate thieves, would drag he
let us alone. --So says Jeff. Davis in his Message. So say all the Southern rebels. We don't want any war — only let us alone, and we will not trouble you. We desire peace. Every thief and robber says the same thing. Every violator of law wants to be let alone. The expression has an appropriate origin. Certain unclean spirits first used it to Jesus of Nazareth. They had full possession, and did not want to be disturbed. The Secessionists have stolen our territory, for which we paid millions; our forts, and navy yards, and arsenals, and ships, and custom-houses, and mints; have cruelly treated our citizens, whipping, tarring and feathering, hanging, and murdering them; have opened their batteries upon a little handful of half-starved men, and burned them out with red-hot shot; have undertaken to break up the best Government upon earth for no other cause than that they could no longer rule it; have erected batteries around other forts, and only wait an opportunity to batter t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, William, 1710-1780 (search)
nce upon Great Britain. He died in England in September, 1780. educator and author; born in Pittsville, Mass., Jan. 2, 1784: graduated at Harvard College in 1802. After entering the ministry and preaching for some time in western New York, he was elected a regent and assistant librarian of Harvard College. He was president of Dartmouth College in 1817-20, and of Bowdoin College in 1820-39. He was the author of Junius unmasked; a supplement to Webster's dictionary; Psalms and hymns; Memoirs of Dr. Eleazer Wheelock and of Dr. John Codmand: a discourse at the close of the second century of the settlement at Northampton, Mass.; Wunaissoo, or the vale of Housatonnuck, a poem; Christian sonnets: poems of Nazareth and the cross: sacred songs; and numerous pamphlets, and contributed biographical articles to Sprague's Annals of the American pulpit. He also prepared the first edition of the American biographical and Historical dictionary. He died in Northampton, Mass., July 16, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Delaware Indians, (search)
e middle of the eighteenth century, the latter, dissatisfied with the interpretation of a treaty, refused to leave their land, the Five Nations haughtily ordered them to go. Commingling with warlike tribes, the Delawares became warlike themselves, and developed great energy on the war-path. They fought the Cherokees, and in 1773 some of them went over the mountains and settled in Ohio. As early as 1741 the Moravians had begun missionary work among them on the Lehigh, near Bethlehem and Nazareth, and a little church was soon filled with Indian converts. At the beginning of the French and Indian War the Delawares were opposed to the English, excepting a portion who were led by the Moravians; but in treaties held at Easton, Pa., at different times, from 1756 until 1761, they made peace with the English, and redeemed themselves from their vassalage to the Six Nations (q. v.). They settled on the Susquehanna, the Christian Indians apart. Then another emigration over the mountains occ
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hazelius, Ernest Lewis 1777-1853 (search)
Hazelius, Ernest Lewis 1777-1853 Clergyman; born in Silesia, Prussia, Sept. 6, 1777; was reared in the Moravian faith, and later became a minister in that Church. In 1800 he accepted a professorship at the Moravian Seminary in Nazareth, Pa. In 1809, however, he joined the Lutheran Church; in 1815 became Professor of Theology in the Hartwick Seminary, and remained there for fifteen years. He published a History of the Lutheran Church in America, etc. He died in South Carolina, Feb. 20, 1853.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
ived altogether in vain. I can trust God with both the time and the manner of my death, believing, as I now do, that for me at this time to seal my testimony (for God and humanity) with my blood, will do vastly more towards advancing the cause I have earnestly endeavored to promote, than all I have done in my life before. I beg of you all meekly and quietly to submit to this; not feeling yourselves in the least degraded on that account. Remember, dear wife and children all, that Jesus of Nazareth suffered a most excruciating death on the cross as a felon, under the most aggravating circumstances. Think, also, of the prophets, and apostles, and Christians of former days, who went through greater tribulations than you or I; and (try to) be reconciled. May God Almighty comfort all your hearts, and soon wipe away all tears from your eyes. To him be endless praise. Think, too, of the crushed millions who ,have no comforter. I charge you all never (in your trials) to forget the grief
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
essiah who is to make this atonement. Will this suffice? I told him that this would not answer; that he must believe in the Messiah already come, even Jesus of Nazareth; and that he must accept the atonement wrought by Him on the cross. Ah! he exclaimed; I was taught from childhood to hate Jesus of Nazareth, and to regard HNazareth, and to regard Him as an impostor! It is so hard to rise above such influences! Yet, if Jesus is the Messiah, I wish to know it, that I may believe in Him, and receive the benefit of His death. Have you any special argument that you can give me in proof that Jesus of Nazareth was the true Messiah? On hearing this, my heart ascended to God fNazareth was the true Messiah? On hearing this, my heart ascended to God for help, and never were arguments furnished to me so readily. I seemed to remove every objection from his mind, and left him in the hands of Infinite Mercy, strongly impressed that the atonement would avail for him not many days hence. Soon after this conversation closed, an order was issued for the battalion to prepare to mov
ction the proofs lie bleeding in thousands of hearts; they have been attested by surrounding voices from almost every slave State, and from slave-owners themselves. Since so it must be, thanks be to God that this mighty cry, this wail of an unutterable anguish, has at last been heard! It has been said, and not in utter despair but in solemn hope and assurance may we regard the struggle that now convulses America,--the outcry of the demon of slavery, which has heard the voice of Jesus of Nazareth, and is rending and convulsing the noble nation from which at last it must depart. It cannot be that so monstrous a solecism can long exist in the bosom of a nation which in all respects is the best exponent of the great principle of universal brotherhood. In America the Frenchman, the German, the Italian, the Swede, and the Irish all mingle on terms of equal right; all nations there display their characteristic excellences and are admitted by her liberal laws to equal privileges: every
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