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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Susquehanna, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Susquehanna, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
hip (Minnesota) was near, and soon passed inside the other two and engaged in the fight. The Susquehanna, which had joined the expedition, came up at eleven o'clock, and at once opened fire. In the day, being ignorant that their own documents had furnished it. of the fort. The Minnesota, Susquehanna, and Pawnee immediately reopened fire on the fort, and the attack was kept up until half-pastime, had run in shore to assist the land forces who had moved up to Johnson's battery. The Susquehanna was the first of the squadron to open fire on the fort on the second day. The Wabash and Minnthe Naval Brigade which had been organized in Hampton Roads. The tug towed a launch, and the Susquehanna accompanied them. An earthwork, little inferior to Fort Hatteras, was found on Operations to Cape Hatteras, where they were met by five hundred of Hawkins's Zouaves, supported by the Susquehanna and Monticello. They had lost about fifty men, most of whom were captured while straggling.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
ls of the expedition to reassemble around the flag-ship. When passing Charleston harbor, Commodore Dupont sent in Captain Lardner with the Seneca to direct the Susquehanna, on blockading duty there, to proceed to Port Royal; and on the following morning, at eight o'clock, the Wabash anchored off Port Royal Bar in company with twenout half-past, nine, by a gun at Fort Walker, which was instantly followed by one at Fort Beauregard. The Wabash immediately responded, and was followed by the Susquehanna. After the first prescribed turn, the signal for closer action was given, at a quarter past ten, the Wabash passing Fort Walker at a distance, when abreast, of eight hundred yards. In the designated order the fight went on. At half-past 11 the flag of Fort Walker was shot away, and the heavy guns of the Wabash and Susquehanna had so discomforted the enemy, as Dupont reported, and the shells from the smaller vessels were falling so thickly upon them at the enfilading point, Commander Jo