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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Susquehanna, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Susquehanna, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: condition of the Navy at the beginning of the war. (search)
was so placed solely to favor the conspirators. Those on the coast of Africa were out of the way of the receipt of orders, as is apparent from the fact that they were issued as soon as possible after the 4th of March, and it was not until the 15th of September that the first of these vessels reached the coast of the United States. To the vessels in the Mediterranean the mails were more accessible; the last of the three steam vessels there reached home July 3, 1861. The Richmond, 16, Susquehanna, 15, and Iroquois, 6 guns, were then available. The sailing frigate Congress, 50 guns, and the steamer Seminole came from the coast of Brazil, the last-named arriving home August 12th. From the East Indies, on December 30, 1861, the steamers Hartford, 16, Dacotah, 6, and sail sloop John Adams were en route. The steamers Pensacola, 19, fitting out at Washington, and Mississippi, 11 guns, at Boston, should be added as available. There were some old sailing vessels that might have been pu
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter VIII Hatteras InletRoanoke Island. (search)
ntinued. A movement by the troops was made along the beach toward Fort Clark, and at 2 P. M. the Union flag was hoisted over it by them. The firing from the fleet had been suspended since 12.30, from the supposition of an intended surrender, as the larger fort was not flying a flag, and was silent. The Monticello was directed at 4 P. M. to effect an entrance to the inlet, and when well within the breakers Fort Hatteras opened on her and received at once the fire from the Minnesota, Susquehanna, and the Pawnee, which latter vessel had joined in the attack, and soon after was followed by the Harriet Lane with her battery of small rifled guns, effective at the long range then necessary to reach the fort. The Wabash at the time was employed in towing the sailing frigate Cumberland into an offing, as it was supposed the fort had surrendered. The bombardment continued until sunset, for the most part ineffective, from too great a distance, when the larger vessels hauled off for th
ed his musket into the bomb-proof among the rebels, and eight or ten others who had ventured near the forts were wounded by our shells. As the ammunition gave out the vessels retired from action, and the ironclads and Minnesota, Colorado, and Susquehanna were ordered to open rapidly, which they did with such effect that it seemed to tear the works to pieces. We drew off at sunset, leaving the ironclads to fire through the night, expecting the troops would attack in the morning, when we would first line, followed in order by the Mohican, Tacony, Kansas, Yantic, Unadilla, Huron, Maumee, Pequot, Pawtuxet, Seneca, Pontoosuc, and Nereus, thirteen vessels. The Minnesota led the second line, followed in order by the Colorado, Wabash, Susquehanna, Powhatan, Juniata, Shenandoah, Ticonderoga, Vanderbilt, Mackinaw, and Tuscarora, eleven heavy vessels. The Santiago de Cuba led the third line, followed in order by the Fort Jackson, Osceola, Sassacus, Chippewa, Cuyler, Maratanza, Rhode Is
flag-officer Francis S. Dupont and Captain Charles H. Davis, Chief of staff, with flag on board of the Wabash. Name of vessel.Name of officer commanding.Battery. WabashCommander C. R. P. Rogers.28 IX-in., 14 Viii-in., 2 X-in. pivots. SusquehannaCaptain J. L. Lardner15 Viii-inch guns. MohicanCommander S. W. Godon2 XI-in. pivots, 4 32-pounders. SeminoleCommander John P. Gillis1 XI-in. pivot, 4 32-pounders. PocahontasCommander Percival Drayton1 XI-in. pivot, 4 32-pounders. PawneeLrifled8913230 4 100-pdrs., rifled 1 Xi-inch shell gun.70 42 Ix-inch shell guns.1,495 ColoradoThatcher1 150-pdr., rifled3140 1 Xi-inch shell gun30 46 Ix-inch shell guns756 WabashSmith1 150-pdr., rifled1540120 42 Ix-inch shell guns1,781 SusquehannaGrodon2 150-pdrs. rifled2153158 12 Ix-inch shell guns643 PowhatanSchenck3 100. pdr., rifledNot given.3197 1 Xl-inch shell gun 14 Ix-inch shell guns JuniataPhelps1 100. pdr., rifled5100 2 30-pdrs.. rifled238 6 Viii-inch shell guns.765
tain F. S., 74 Stellwagen, Commander Henry S., 165, 171 Stephens, Alexander H., address of, 1 et seq., 246 Stettin, the, 80 et seq. Stevens, General I. L, 30, 43, 45 Stevens Lieutenant-Commanding Thomas H., 21, 54, 61, 138 Stimers, Chief-Engineer Alban C., 109 et seq., 138 Stolesbury, Engineer, 213 Stringham, Commodore, 165, 169, 171 Strong, Commander J. H., 81 Stuyvesant, Report of, 143 Sumter, Fort, see Fort Sumter. Sumter, the, U. S. steamer, 7 Susquehanna, the, U. S. vessel, 7, 16, 20 et seq., 23, 27, 32, 166 et seq., 174, 224, 228 Swan, Paymaster, 212 T. Tacony, the, 218, 228, 239 Tatnall, Commodore, Josiah, 19; his defence of Fort Walker, 22 et seq., 47 Taylor, Captain, Wm. Rogers, 77, 81 Terry, General A. H., 129 et seq., 160, 228, 231 et seq., 236 et seq., 241 et seq. Thompson, Colonel, 171 Ticonderoga, the, 222, 228 Toombs, Engineer, 141 Torpedoes, sketch of, 140; success of, 148; facts about, 157 et se