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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Muhlenberg, Frederick Augustus Conrad 1750-1801 (search)
Muhlenberg, Frederick Augustus Conrad 1750-1801 Clergyman; born in Trappe, Pa., June 2, 1750; was a Lutheran minister; took an active part in the Revolutionary movements, and was a member of the Continental Congress (1779-80). He was an active member of the Pennsylvania Assembly, and its speaker from 1781 to 1784; a member of the council and treasurer of the State, and president of the convention that ratified the national Constitution. He was receiver-general of the Land Office, and was speaker of the first and second Congress. In that capacity his casting vote carried Jay's treaty (see Jay, John) into effect. He died in Lancaster, Pa., June 4, 1801.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Muhlenberg, Henry Melchior 1711-1787 (search)
erg, Henry Melchior 1711-1787 Clergyman; born in Eimbeck, Hanover, Germany, Sept. 6, 1711; was the patriarch of the Lutheran Church in America, having come to Philadelphia as a missionary in the fall of 1742. He afterwards lived at Trappe, Montgomery co., Pa. He was devoted to the service of building up churches, relieving the destitute, and doing his Master's business continually, travelling as far as Georgia. In 1748 he was chiefly instrumental in organizing the first Lutheran synod in A, Germany, Sept. 6, 1711; was the patriarch of the Lutheran Church in America, having come to Philadelphia as a missionary in the fall of 1742. He afterwards lived at Trappe, Montgomery co., Pa. He was devoted to the service of building up churches, relieving the destitute, and doing his Master's business continually, travelling as far as Georgia. In 1748 he was chiefly instrumental in organizing the first Lutheran synod in America, that of Pennsylvania. He died in Trappe, Pa., Oct. 7, 1787.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Muhlenberg, John Peter Gabriel 1746- (search)
Muhlenberg, John Peter Gabriel 1746- Patriot; born in Trappe, Pa., Oct. 1, 1746; was educated at Halle, Germany; ran away, and for a year was a private in a John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg. regiment of dragoons; was ordained in 1772, and preached at Woodstock, Va., until the Revolutionary War broke out. One Sunday he told his hearers that there was a time for all things—a time to preach and a time to fight—and that then was the time to fight. Casting off his gown, he appeared in the regimentals of a Virginia colonel, read his commission as such, and ordered drummers to beat up for recruits. Nearly all the able-bodied men of his parish responded, and became soldiers of the 8th Virginia (German) regiment. He had been an active patriot in civil life, and was efficient in military service. In February, 1777, he was made brigadier-general, and took charge of the Virginia line, under Washington. He was in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth, and was at the captur
Horrible affair near Trappe. --On Wednesday last, a colored man, named Daniel Joshua, residing near Trappe, cut his wife's arms off, and also stabbed her son. The wife expired the next day, becoming exhausted from loss of blood. The boy, we believe, is still living. A jury of inquest was held over the body of the deceased on Thursday. This affair, we learn, was caused from Joshua finding his wife too intimate with another man. Joshua, so far, has kept out of the reach of the officers. e. --On Wednesday last, a colored man, named Daniel Joshua, residing near Trappe, cut his wife's arms off, and also stabbed her son. The wife expired the next day, becoming exhausted from loss of blood. The boy, we believe, is still living. A jury of inquest was held over the body of the deceased on Thursday. This affair, we learn, was caused from Joshua finding his wife too intimate with another man. Joshua, so far, has kept out of the reach of the officers. Boston (Maryland) Gazette.