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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
oun. June 10-July 3, 1864.Operations about Marietta, with combats at Pine Hill, Lost Mountain, Brush Mountain, Gilgal Church, Noonday Creek, McAfee's Cross-Roads, Kenesaw Mountain, Powder Springs, Cheney's Farm, Kolb's Farm, Olley's Creek, Nickajack Creek, Noyes' Creek, and other points. June 24, 1864.Action at La Fayette. July 4, 1864.Skirmishes at Ruff's Mill, Neal Dow Station, and Rottenwood Creek. July 5-17, 1864.Operations on the line of the Chattahoochee River, with skirmishes at Howell's, Turner's, and Pace's Ferries, Isham's Ford, and other points. July 10-22, 1864.Rousseau's raid from Decatur, Ala., to the West Point and Montgomery Railroad, with skirmishes near Coosa River (11th), near Greenpoint and at Ten Island Ford (14th), near Auburn and near Chehaw (18th). July 18, 1864.Skirmish at Buck Head. General John B. Hood, C. S. Army, supersedes General Joseph E. Johnston in command of the Army of Tennessee. July 19, 1864.Skirmishes on Peach Tree Creek. July 20, 1864.B
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
l. A. G. McCook) was formed on the left of the Third, and King's brigade was formed in reserve with the artillery. At 4 p. m. Colonel Moore advanced his line southeast on the Buck Head road, over a veryTough and rugged country, to Nancy's Creek, where he bivouacked for the night. July 18, at 7 a. m. I directed McCook to take the advance; skirmishing commenced at 9 a. m. and continued, the enemy falling back slowly until about 2 p. m., when line of battle was formed on the Buck Head and Howells Ferry road. A heavy line of skirmishers were thrown forward to drive the enemy beyond Peach Tree Creek. On retiring beyond the creek the bridge was destroyed by the rebels, and they opened up a vigorous fire with shell and case-shot upon the reserves. July 19, bridges were constructed to cross the command, and on July 20 the creek was crossed, the troops thrown in line, and temporary breast-works constructed. About 3 p. m. a heavy fire began along the whole line of the Twentieth Corps, gra
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
herman and Johnston, which we shall consider presently. La Grange rejoined the main column soon after its arrival at Macon, but Croxton's brigade was still absent, and Wilson felt some uneasiness concerning its safety. All apprehensions were ended by its arrival on the 31st, April, 1865. after many adventures. We left Croxton not far from Tuscaloosa, in Alabama, on the 2d of April, outnumbered by Jackson, of Forrest's command. See page 516. From that point he moved rapidly to Johnson's Ferry, on the Black Warrior, fourteen miles above Tuscaloosa, where he crossed that stream, and sweeping down its western bank, surprised and captured April 5. the place he had been sent against from Elyton, together with three guns and about fifty prisoners. Then he destroyed the military school and other public property there, and leaving Tuscaloosa, burned the bridges over the Black Warrior, and pushed on southwesterly, to Eutaw, in Greene County. There he was told that Wirt Adams was af
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
ountain June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Gilgal or Golgotha Church June 15. Muddy Creek June 17. Noyes Creek June 19. Kolb's Farm June 22. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's or Neal Dow Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Operations at Chattahoochie River Bridge August 26-September 2. Occupation of Atlanta September 2-November 15. Near Turner's and Howell's Ferries, Chattahoochie River, October 19 (Detachment). March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Lawtonville, S. C., February 2. Taylor's Hole Creek, Averysboro, N. C., March 16. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
East Tennessee, to July, 1865. Cavalry Brigade, District East Tennessee, to August, 1865. Service. Action at Owensboro, Ky., September 18, 1862. Sutherland Farm September 19. Action at Calhoun, Ky., November 25, 1862. Operations against Morgan's Raid into Kentucky December 22, 1862, to January 2, 1863. Bear Wallow, Ky., December 23, 1862. Near Glasgow December 24. Bear Wallow and near Munfordsville December 25. Bacon Creek near Munfordsville December 26. Johnson's Ferry, Hamilton's Ford, Rolling Fork, December 29. Boston, Ky., December 29. Duty in District of Western Kentucky till April, 1863. Creelsborough April 19. Expedition to Monticello and operations in Southeastern Kentucky April 26-May 12. Narrows, Horse Shoe Bottom, April 28-29. Horse Shoe Bend, Greasy Creek, May 10. Pursuit of Morgan through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio July 2-26. Marrowbone July 2. Buffington's Island, Ohio, July 19. Surrender of Morgan near Chesh
rdinary marches on record. The route taken by Croxton's brigade, after leaving Elyton, Alabama, March thirtieth, encamped same night eight miles south of Elyton, marched next day to Trion, and returned ten miles on Elyton road, thence to Johnson's Ferry, forty miles above Tuscaloosa. April third, moved to Northport, and on the fifth marched twenty-five miles on Columbus road to King's store; sixth, moved on Pleasant Ridge road twelve miles to Lanier's mill, from there returned to Northportor, were killed; both belonged to Fourth Iowa cavalry. April third. By direction of Brevet Major-General Wilson, I assumed command of the city, while my brigade, Colonel Noble commanding, made a march to the rear, through Summerfield, to Johnson's Ferry, returning on the sixth instant. With the army this brigade moved from Selma, April tenth, arriving at Montgomery on the twelfth, near which city we remained until the fourteenth. Major Crukendoll, with six companies Third Iowa cavalry, w