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rict, 139, 284. Burr, Aaron, 290. Burr, Theodosia, 290. Butler, Albert, 140. Butler, Benjamin F., 1, 16. Butler, Lewis, 87. Butler, Pierce, 45. C. C Company, 10, 20, 38, 39, 40, 75, 90, 92, 129, 145, 148, 150, 155, 164, 168,173, 183, 186, 198, 207, 234, 237, 245, 247, 263, 285, 286, 291, 300, 309, 310, 311, 312, 316, 317, 318, 320, 321. Cabot, John H., 16. Cabot, Mary E., 16. Cabot, S., Jr., 15. Calcium lights, 117, 138. Callahan, Fla., 155. Called, Daniel, 12. Camden, S. C., 297, 300. Camden Branch Railroad, 295, 297, 306. Cameron, Captain, 173. Camp Finegan, Fla., 153, 155, 174, 175. Camp Milton, Fla., 175, 178. Camp Shaw, Fla., 156. Camps, locations, 19, 38, 39, 46, 53, 105,149, 153, 155, 175, 176, 178, 186, 187, 205, 238, 251, 254, 257, 262, 265, 269, 271, 274, 275, 278, 279, 280, 284, 286, 290, 291, 293, 295, 298, 299, 300, 305, 306, 307, 308, 310, 316, 317. Campbell, J. B., 312. Canonicus, steamer, 186, 288, 290. Captured men, 95, 96, 97,
ations of hostility, save a few hisses. This was a regiment without arms. This fact I communicated to the Sixth, but, at the same time, advised that they should relax no vigilance on that account. The regiment started; and I stood at the telegraph instrument in Philadelphia, constantly receiving messages of its progress. Finally, it was announced from Baltimore that they were in sight; next, that they were received at the station with cheers; then that ten car-loads had started for the Camden-street station, and all was right; then that the other four car-loads had started, and turned the corner on to Pratt Street all right; then, after a few moments, that the track was torn up in front of the last four cars, and they were attacked on Pratt Street. Then the reports subsided into mere rumors, and we could not tell whether the mob was to succeed, or the military was to be triumphant, as guns were being fired by both rioters and military, and the tide of battle was surging, now this
s had very hard work to restore it and get his command across. At last he suceeded, and the left wing was all put in motion for Cheraw. In the mean time, the right wing had broken up the railroad to Winnsboro, and thence turned for Peay's ferry, where it was crossed over the Catawba before the heavy rains set in, the Seventeenth corps moving straight on Cheraw, via Young's bridge, and the Fifteenth corps by Tiller's and Kelly's bridges. From this latter corps, detachments were sent into Camden to burn the bridge over the Wateree, with the railroad depot, stores, &c. A small force of mounted men under Captain Duncan was also despatched to make a dash and interrupt the railroad from Charleston to Florence, but it met Butler s division of cavalry, and after a sharp night skirmish on Mount Elon, was compelled to return unsuccessful. Much bad road was encountered at Lynch's creek, which delayed the right wing about the same length of time as the left wing had been at the Catawba. O
f marks' Mills, Ark. Subjoined is an account of the battle of Marks' Mills, by An eye-witness. The battle was fought near the junction of the roads leading to Camden and Warren, and takes its name from the mill which the rebel General made his headquarters during the action. The expedition was known to be of a hazardous nature. If Camden was to be held, supplies must be procured overland from Pine Bluff, or by steamers up the Washita. The prospect was not good for receiving them by the latter route; but it was known that only Shelby's forces was north of the Washita, and Colonel Drake's force was fully competent to manage him. If reinforcements weby his cavalry in time to reinforce Colonel Drake. It subsequently transpired that General Fagen crossed the Washita on the second night after Colonel Drake left Camden, making a forced march of forty-five miles the next day, and joining Shelby in the neighborhood of Marks' Mills. The rebel force then numbered over six thousan
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
in the shock of battle. I might give scores of illustrations of this point, but must content myself now with the story of Richard Kirkland, the humane hero of Fredericksburg, as it is told by the gallant soldier and able jurist, General J. B. Kershaw, of South Carolina (now Judge Kershaw), who commanded the brigade at the time. I will only premise that Kirkland had professed conversion but a short time before, and will give the incident in General Kershaw's own eloquent words: Camden, South Carolina, January 29, 1880. To the Editor of the News and Courier: Your Columbia correspondent referred to the incident narrated here, telling the story as 'twas told to him, and inviting corrections. As such a deed should be recorded in the rigid simplicity of actual truth, I take the liberty of sending you for publication an accurate account of a transaction every feature of which is indelibly impressed upon my memory. Very truly yours, J. B. Kershaw. Richard Kirkland was the
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
s to organize all the chaplains and missionaries into an Association for mutual aid and co-operation. When we went into camp at Camp Bragg, thirty miles west of Camden, we there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863–‘64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in hae belonged to the army. Like meetings were held in other camps of the same army at some ten, twenty, and thirty miles from us. Brothers Jewell and Winfield, of Camden, were zealously and constantly engaged in the great work in the encampment near their homes, and were very successful. At Three-Creeks I had the efficient aid of these gracious revivals in the army, we may safely say that at Three-Creeks there were 500 conversions. Under Brothers Winfield and Jewell there were 300. At Camden and Camp Bragg there were 200. Making in all in Arkansas 1,000 souls. To show the genuineness of this work of grace upon the lives of these converts, we have
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Index. (search)
Hale, John P., 338, 350. Hamilton, Alexander, 1004. Hamlin, Hannibal, 338. Haydon, Benjamin Robert, 294, 295. Hayne, Robert Y., 209. Herald, Newburyport, 21, 26. Herald, New York, 340, 341. Higginson, T. W., 358-359, 361. Hoar, Samuel, 314. Horton, Jacob, 61. Hovey, Charles F., 389. Jackson, Francis, 233, 240-241, 311-312, 317, 341, 344. Jewett, Daniel E., 175. Jocelyn, Rev. Simeon Smith, 203. Johnson, Andrew, 380. Johnson, Oliver, 114, 134, 137, 139, 16o-16I, 374. journal, Camden (S. C.), 128. Journal, Louisville (Ky.), 120. Kansas, Struggle over, 357-358. Kelley, Abby, 259, 291, 310. Kimball, David T., 175. Knapp, Isaac, 113, 127, 139, 197, 200, 265, 301-302. Kneeland, Abner, 90, 268. Lane Seminary, 189. Latimer, George, 312. Leavitt, Joshua, 149,320. 329. Leggett, Samuel. 86. Liberator, The, III-20, 126-29, 131, 141, 163, 165, 169, 176, 197-204, 236, 237, 265, 284, 297, 327-329, 388. Lincoln, Abraham, 365, 370, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 382, 384. Lloyd, F
rk was to organize all the chaplains and missionaries into an Association for mutual aid and cooperation. When we went into camp at Camp Bragg, 30 miles west of Camden, we there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863-64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in hav he belonged to the army. Like meetings were held in other camps of the same army at some ten, twenty, and thirty miles from us. Bros. Jewell and Winfield, of Camden, were zealously and constantly engaged in the great work in the encampment near their homes, and were very successful. At Three-Creeks I had the efficient aid s of these gracious revivals in the army, we may safely say that at Three-Creeks there were 500 conversions. Under Bros. Winfield and Jewell there were 300. At Camden and Camp Bragg there were 200. Making in all in Arkansas 1,000 souls. To show the genuineness of this work of grace upon the lives of these converts, we have
en a testament and they were then allowed to roam about the city for a time after dinner. Some of the men struck up: Nineteenth regiment is marching on, Nineteenth regiment is marching on, Glory, Glory, Hallelujah— Glory, Glory, Hallelujah, As Hinks goes marching on. The regiment left the City Hall Park, marched up Broadway, countermarched at the Metropolitan hotel, passed through Canal to Vestry Street, to Pier 39, North River, and went on board the Ferry boat John Potter, of the Camden and Amboy Line, taking the cars at Perth Amboy for Washington. On the march through the streets of New York City, cheers were given for the Union, The Commonwealth, The Hub of the Universe and Our New York Friends. The journey to Baltimore was one continuous ovation. Not much sleep was had, as the regiment was met at every station and all along the line with great enthusiasm, crowds cheering, flags flying, and, at many places, the firing of cannon. The regiment arrived in Philadelphia at
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 43: march through the Carolinas; the taking of Columbia (search)
m and the cavalry will have the road from Lancaster to Chesterfield, and you (Howard) from your ferry go straight for Cheraw, dipping a little south to get on the Camden road. I will keep with the Twentieth Corps. From this it will be seen what a wide swath we were making, and the general direction taken by the whole command. ll our right flank. Having very little cavalry, I sent southward and eastward Captain Wm. Duncan with all his horsemen, about two troops of cavalry, first toward Camden. The evening of February 25th Duncan returned from the first expedition. He succeeded in burning an important bridge in Camden and in capturing, for the use of Camden and in capturing, for the use of the army, considerable stock. It was here that the famous white Arabian stallion was brought in, one that the people declared to be the property of the Confederate President. The horse, they said, had been, previous to our coming, sent into that part of Carolina for safe keeping. The second expedition had a double purpose; f
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