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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cowpens, the (search)
ens, the This name was derived from the circumstance that, some years before the Revolution, before that section of South Carolina was settled, some persons in Camden (then called Pine-Tree) employed two men to go up to the Thicketty Mountain, and in the grassy intervals among the hills raise cattle. As a compensation, they wese of the cows during the summer, for making butter and cheese, and the steers in tillage. In the fall large numbers of the fatted cattle would be driven down to Camden to be slaughtered for beef on account of the owners. This region, on account of its grass and fine springs, was peculiarly favorable for the rearing and use of c00 killed and wounded, and nearly 500 made prisoners. The spoils were two cannon, 800 muskets, horses, and two standards. The cannon had been taken from the British at Saratoga, and retaken from Gates at Camden. The Congress gave Morgan the thanks of the nation and a gold medal, and to Howard and Washington each a silver medal.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davie, William Richardson, -1820 (search)
nexed it to Pulaski's Legion. He fought at Stono, Hanging Rock, and Rocky Mount; and at the head of a legionary corps, with the rank of major, he opposed the advance of Cornwallis into North Carolina. After the overthrow of the American army at Camden he saved the remnant of it; and he was a most efficient commissary under General Greene in the Southern Department. He rose to great eminence as a lawyer after the war, and was a delegate to the convention that framed the national Constitution, nstitution, but sickness at home compelled him to leave before the work was accomplished. In the convention of North Carolina he was its most earnest and able supporter. In 1799 he was governor of North Carolina, but was soon afterwards sent as one of the envoys to the French Directory. Very soon after his return he withdrew from public life. In March, 1813, he was appointed a major-general, but declined the service on account of bodily infirmities. He died in Camden, S. C., Nov. 8, 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drayton, William Henry, 1742-1779 (search)
he soon espoused the cause of the patriots, and protested against the proceedings of his colleagues. In 1774 he addressed a pamphlet to the Continental Congress, in which he stated the grievances of the Americans, and drew up a bill of rights, and substantially marked out the line of conduct adopted by the Congress. He was appointed a judge in 1774, but was suspended from the office when he became a member of the committee of safety at Charleston. The first charge to the grand jury at Camden, S. C., in 1774, by Judge Drayton is conspicuous in American history. In order to stimulate your exertions in favor of your civil liberties, which protect your religious rights, he said, instead of discoursing to you on the laws of other states and comparing them to our own, allow me to tell you what your civil liberties are, and to charge you, which I do in the most solemn manner, to hold them dearer than your lives—a lesson and charge at all times proper from a judge, but particularly so at
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fishing Creek, action at. (search)
Fishing Creek, action at. When General Gates was approaching Camden in 1780 he sent General Sumter with a detachment to intercept a convoy of stores passing from Ninety-six to Rawdon's camp at Camden. Sumter was successful. He captured forty-four wagons loaded with clothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his Camden. Sumter was successful. He captured forty-four wagons loaded with clothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his troops were routed with great slaughter. More than fifty were killed and 300 were made prisoners. Tarleton recaptured the British prisoners and all the wagons and their contents. Sumter escaped, and in such haste that he rode into Charlotte, N. C., without hat or saddle.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gates, Horatio 1728-1806 (search)
eral Schuyler. He gained undeserved honors as commander of the troops that defeated and captured Burgoyne and his army in the fall of 1777. He soon afterwards intrigued for the position of Washington as commander-inchief, using his power as president of the board of war for the purpose, but ignominously failed. In June, 1780, he was Horatio Gates. made commander of the Southern Department, but made a disastrous campaign, his army being utterly defeated and routed by Cornwallis near Camden, S. C., in August, 1780. This defeat terminated Gates's military career. He was removed from command and suspended from service, but was finally vindicated, and reinstated in command in 1782. He retired to his estate in Virginia, and in 1790 made his residence in New York City, having first emancipated all his slaves, and provided for such of them as could not take care of themselves. He was presented with the freedom of the city of New York, and elected to the State legislature, but declin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), George (William Frederick) 1737-1820 (search)
h been much promoted and encouraged by the traitorous correspondence, counsels, and comfort of divers wicked and desperate persons within our realm, and he called upon all officers of the realm, civil and military, and all his subjects, to disclose all traitorous conspiracies, giving information of the same to one of the secretaries of state, in order to bring to condign punishment the authors, perpetrators, and abettors of such traitorous designs. This proclamation was aimed at Chatham and Camden in the House of Lords, and Barr6 in the House of Commons, and their active political friends. When it was read to the people at the Royal Exchange it was received with a general hiss from the populace. But the stubborn King would not yield. He would rather perish than consent to repeal the alterations in the charter of Massachusetts, or yield the absolute authority of Parliament. And North, who in his heart thought the King wrong, supported him chiefly, as was alleged, because he loved o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hobkirk's Hill, battle of. (search)
battle of. When (in 1781) Greene heard of the retreat of Cornwallis, he pursued him as far as the Deep River, when he turned back and moved southward towards Camden to strike a blow for the recovery of South Carolina. Lord Rawdon was in command at Camden. On April 19 Greene encamped at Hobkirk's Hill, about a mile from RawdCamden. On April 19 Greene encamped at Hobkirk's Hill, about a mile from Rawdon's intrenchments, where, six days afterwards, he was surprised by the British and defeated, after a sharp battle of several hours. Greene's force was too weak to assail Rawdon's intrenchments with any prospect of success, and he encamped on a wooded eminence and awaited reinforcements under Sumter. On the night of the 24th a dade a gallant charge, and checked them. By this movement Greene was enabled to save all his artillery and baggage. He rallied his men, crossed the Wateree above Camden, and rested in a strong position before moving on Fort Ninety-Six. The loss of each army in the battle was about the same—less than 270. This defeat disconcerte
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howard, John eager 1752-1827 (search)
Howard, John eager 1752-1827 Military officer; born in Baltimore county, Md., June 4, 1752; was a captain in Hull's regiment John eager Howard. at the battle of White Plains; became a major in the Continental army in 1777; and was distinguished in the battle of Germantown. He was in the battle of Monmouth (q. v.), and was made a lieutenant-colonel. In 1780 he was detailed, with the Maryland and Delaware troops, to serve in the Southern Department. In Gates's defeat, near Camden, he participared, and he led the Continental infantry in the battle of the Cowpens, at one time holding in his hands the swords of seven surrendered British officers. For his conduct there Congress voted him a silver medal. It was the first occasion during the Revolutionary War in which the bayonet was effectively used. He was distinguished in the battles of Guildford, Hobkirk's Hill, and Eutaw Springs, and was severely wounded in the latter engagement After the war he married a daughter of Chief-J
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jenkinson's Ferry, battle of. (search)
dy of Confederates. He started southward, March 23, with 8,000 troops, cavalry and infantry. He was to be joined by General Thayer at Arkadelphia, with 5,000 men, but this was not then accomplished. Steele pushed on for the purpose of flanking Camden and drawing out Price from his fortifications there. Early in April Steele was joined by Thayer, and on the evening of the 15th they entered Camden as victors. Seriously menaced by gathering Confederates, Steele, who, by the retreat of Banks, hCamden as victors. Seriously menaced by gathering Confederates, Steele, who, by the retreat of Banks, had been released from duty elsewhere, moved towards Little Rock. He crossed the Washita on the night of April 26. At Jenkinson's Ferry, on the Sabine River, he was attacked by an overwhelming force, led by Gen. Kirby Smith in person. Steele's troops, though nearly famished, fought desperately during a most sanguinary battle that ensued. Three times the Confederates charged heavily, and were repulsed. The battle was fought by infantry alone, and the Nationals finally drove their adversarie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kalb, Johann, Baron de 1721- (search)
e Kalb. Charleston, but was soon succeeded by General Gates, when he became that officer's second in command. In the disastrous battle at Sander's Creek, near Camden, S. C., he was mortally wounded, and died three days afterwards, Aug. 19, 1780. De Kalb's monument. His body was pierced with eleven wounds. It was buried at Camdek, near Camden, S. C., he was mortally wounded, and died three days afterwards, Aug. 19, 1780. De Kalb's monument. His body was pierced with eleven wounds. It was buried at Camden. A marble monument was erected to his memory in front of the Presbyterian Church at Camden, the corner-stone of which was laid by Lafayette in 1825.k, near Camden, S. C., he was mortally wounded, and died three days afterwards, Aug. 19, 1780. De Kalb's monument. His body was pierced with eleven wounds. It was buried at Camden. A marble monument was erected to his memory in front of the Presbyterian Church at Camden, the corner-stone of which was laid by Lafayette in 1825.
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