Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) or search for Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
1779 Chemung (near Elmira, N. Y.)Aug. 29, 1779 SavannahOct. 9, 1779 Charleston (Siege and Surrender of)May 12, 1780 Springfield (N. J.)June 23, 1780 Rocky Mount (N. C.)July 30, 1780 Hanging Rock (N. C.)Aug. 6, 1780 Sander's Creek (near Camden, S. C.)Aug. 16, 1780 King's Mountain (S. C.)Oct. 7, 1780 Fish Dam FordNov. 18, 1780 BlackstocksNov. 20, 1780 CowpensJan. 17, 1781 GuilfordMar. 15, 1781 Hobkirk's HillApril 25, 1781 Ninety-six (Siege of)May and June 1781 Augusta (Siege of)May1779 Chemung (near Elmira, N. Y.)Aug. 29, 1779 SavannahOct. 9, 1779 Charleston (Siege and Surrender of)May 12, 1780 Springfield (N. J.)June 23, 1780 Rocky Mount (N. C.)July 30, 1780 Hanging Rock (N. C.)Aug. 6, 1780 Sander's Creek (near Camden, S. C.)Aug. 16, 1780 King's Mountain (S. C.)Oct. 7, 1780 Fish Dam FordNov. 18, 1780 BlackstocksNov. 20, 1780 CowpensJan. 17, 1781 GuilfordMar. 15, 1781 Hobkirk's HillApril 25, 1781 Ninety-six (Siege of)May and June 1781 Augusta (Siege of)Ma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, Abraham, 1778-1833 (search)
ief of Lincoln at Charleston, heard of his surrender, they returned towards North Carolina. Buford's command consisted of nearly 400 Continental infantry, a small detachment of Colonel Washington's cavalry, and two field-pieces. He had reached Camden in safety, and was retreating leisurely towards Charlotte, when Colonel Tarleton, with 700 men, all mounted, sent in pursuit by Cornwallis, overtook Buford upon the Waxhaw Creek. Tarleton had marched 100 miles in fifty-four hours. With only his s given, and men without arms were hewn to pieces by the sabres of Tarleton's cavalry. There were 113 slain; and 150 were so maimed as to be unable to travel, and fifty-three were made prisoners to grace the triumphal entry of the conqueror into Camden. Only five of the British were killed and fifteen wounded. All of Buford's artillery, ammunition, and baggage became spoil for the enemy. For this savage feat Cornwallis eulogized Tarleton, and commended him to the ministers as worthy of specia
Camden A village in South Carolina, where, on Aug. 16, 1780, about 3,600 Americans, under General Gates, were defeated by from 2,000 to 2,500 British, under Lord Cornwallis, losing 700 men, among them Baron de Kalb mortally wounded, nearly all their luggage and artillery.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Caswell, Richard 1729-1789 (search)
729: went to North Carolina in 1746, and practised law there, serving in the Assembly from 1754 to 1771, and being speaker in 1770. In the battle of the Allamance he commanded Tryon's right wing, but soon afterwards identified himself with the cause of the patriots, and was a member of the Continental Congress (1774-75). For three years he was president of the Provincial Congress of North Carolina, and was governor of the State from 1777 to 1779. In February, 1776, he was in command of the patriot troops in the battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, and received the thanks of Congress and the commission of majorgeneral for the victory there achieved. He led the State troops in the battle near Camden (August, 1780); and was controller-general in 1782. He was again governor in 1784-86; and a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution. While presiding as speaker in the North Carolina Assembly he was stricken with paralysis, and died in Fayetteville, N. C., Nov. 20, 1789.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chestnut, James, Jr. (search)
Chestnut, James, Jr. Senator; born near Camden, S. C., in 1815; graduated at Princeton College in 1835; elected United States Senator from South Carolina, Jan. 5, 1859. When it became evident that his State would secede he resigned his seat, but his resignation was not accepted, and on July 11, 1861, he was expelled. He was a member of the Confederate Provisional Congress; entered the Confederate army; became aide to Jefferson Davis; and was promoted brigadiergeneral in 1864.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
to England, but soon came back; was at the capture of Charleston in May, 1780; was commander of the British troops in the Carolinas that year; defeated Gates near Camden in August; fought Greene at Guildford Court-house early in 1781; invaded Virginia, and finally took post at and fortified Yorktown, on the York River, and there she Tories committed many crimes. Tarleton and his legion spread terror in many districts. A quartermaster of his command entered the house of Samuel Wyley, near Camden, and cut him in pieces with his sword, because he had served as a, volunteer in defence of Charleston. Because the Presbyterians generally supported the American 7, 1781, then garrisoned by a small force under Major Craig, where he remained long enough to rest and recruit his shattered army. Apprised of Greene's march on Camden, and hoping to draw him away from Lord Rawdon, the earl marched into Virginia and joined the forces of Phillips and Arnold at Petersburg. So ended British rule i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cowpens, the (search)
ens, the This name was derived from the circumstance that, some years before the Revolution, before that section of South Carolina was settled, some persons in Camden (then called Pine-Tree) employed two men to go up to the Thicketty Mountain, and in the grassy intervals among the hills raise cattle. As a compensation, they wese of the cows during the summer, for making butter and cheese, and the steers in tillage. In the fall large numbers of the fatted cattle would be driven down to Camden to be slaughtered for beef on account of the owners. This region, on account of its grass and fine springs, was peculiarly favorable for the rearing and use of c00 killed and wounded, and nearly 500 made prisoners. The spoils were two cannon, 800 muskets, horses, and two standards. The cannon had been taken from the British at Saratoga, and retaken from Gates at Camden. The Congress gave Morgan the thanks of the nation and a gold medal, and to Howard and Washington each a silver medal.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davie, William Richardson, -1820 (search)
nexed it to Pulaski's Legion. He fought at Stono, Hanging Rock, and Rocky Mount; and at the head of a legionary corps, with the rank of major, he opposed the advance of Cornwallis into North Carolina. After the overthrow of the American army at Camden he saved the remnant of it; and he was a most efficient commissary under General Greene in the Southern Department. He rose to great eminence as a lawyer after the war, and was a delegate to the convention that framed the national Constitution, nstitution, but sickness at home compelled him to leave before the work was accomplished. In the convention of North Carolina he was its most earnest and able supporter. In 1799 he was governor of North Carolina, but was soon afterwards sent as one of the envoys to the French Directory. Very soon after his return he withdrew from public life. In March, 1813, he was appointed a major-general, but declined the service on account of bodily infirmities. He died in Camden, S. C., Nov. 8, 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drayton, William Henry, 1742-1779 (search)
he soon espoused the cause of the patriots, and protested against the proceedings of his colleagues. In 1774 he addressed a pamphlet to the Continental Congress, in which he stated the grievances of the Americans, and drew up a bill of rights, and substantially marked out the line of conduct adopted by the Congress. He was appointed a judge in 1774, but was suspended from the office when he became a member of the committee of safety at Charleston. The first charge to the grand jury at Camden, S. C., in 1774, by Judge Drayton is conspicuous in American history. In order to stimulate your exertions in favor of your civil liberties, which protect your religious rights, he said, instead of discoursing to you on the laws of other states and comparing them to our own, allow me to tell you what your civil liberties are, and to charge you, which I do in the most solemn manner, to hold them dearer than your lives—a lesson and charge at all times proper from a judge, but particularly so at
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fishing Creek, action at. (search)
Fishing Creek, action at. When General Gates was approaching Camden in 1780 he sent General Sumter with a detachment to intercept a convoy of stores passing from Ninety-six to Rawdon's camp at Camden. Sumter was successful. He captured forty-four wagons loaded with clothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his Camden. Sumter was successful. He captured forty-four wagons loaded with clothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his troops were routed with great slaughter. More than fifty were killed and 300 were made prisoners. Tarleton recaptured the British prisoners and all the wagons and their contents. Sumter escaped, and in such haste that he rode into Charlotte, N. C., without hat or saddle.
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