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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 2 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Macon, Nathaniel 1757-1837 (search)
Macon, Nathaniel 1757-1837 Statesman; born in Warren county, N. C., Dec. 17, 1757; was attending college at Princeton when the Revolutionary War broke out; returned home and volunteered as a private soldier in the company of his brother. He was at the fall of Charleston, the disaster to Gates near Camden, and with Greene in his remarkable retreat across the Carolinas. From 1780 to 1785 he was a member of the North Carolina Assembly, and there opposed the ratification of the national Constitution. From 1791 to 1815 he was a member of Congress, and from 1816 to 1828 United States Senator. He was a warm personal friend of Jefferson and Madison, and his name has been given to one of the counties of North Carolina. John Randolph said of him in his will: He is the best, purest, and wisest man that I ever knew. Mr. Jefferson called him The last of the Romans. He selected for his place of burial an untillable ridge, ordered the spot to be marked only by a pile of loose stones, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Marion, Francis (search)
780, two days after Williams's exploit at Musgrove's Mill. At dawn on that day a British party, with 150 prisoners of the Maryland line, captured from Gates near Camden (see Gates, Horatio), were crossing at the great savanna, near the ferry, on the route from Camden to Charleston, when Marion and his men sprang upon the guard, lCamden to Charleston, when Marion and his men sprang upon the guard, liberated the prisoners, and captured twenty-six of the escort. Marion and his brigade achieved victory after victory over bands of Tories and British among the swamps of the Santee, and late in October they pushed forward to assail the British garrison at Georgetown, on Winyaw Bay, for the purpose of obtaining necessary supplie(Nov. 5, 1780): I most sincerely hope you will get at Mr. Marion. On that march Tarleton and his corps set fire to all the houses and destroyed all the corn from Camden to Nelson's Ferry; beat the widow of a general officer because she would not tell where Marion was encamped, and burned her dwelling and wasted everything about,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Murray, James Ormsbee 1827-1899 (search)
Murray, James Ormsbee 1827-1899 Educator; born in Camden, S. C., Nov. 27, 1827; graduated at Brown University in 1850, and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1854. Soon afterwards he became pastor of the Congregational Church in Peabody, Mass., where he remained till 1861. He was then called to the pastorate of the Prospect Street Church in Cambridgeport, which he left in 1865 to become associate pastor with the Rev. Dr. Spring, in the Brick Presbyterian Church in New York. In 1873 he succeeded to this pastorate; in 1874 accepted the Professorship of Belles-Lettres, and English Language and Literature in the Princeton University; and in 1886 became the first dean of the faculty of Princeton. His works include Life of Francis Wayland; George Ide Chace: a Memorial; Introduction, with bibliography, to Cowper's poetical works; William Gammell: a biographical sketch, with selections from his writings; Lectures on English Literature; and The sacrifice of praise, a compilation of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peace commissioners. (search)
ain unless the fleets and armies should be withdrawn and the independence of the United States be declared. Their papers were returned to them with a letter from the president of the Congress saying they could not treat excepting on a basis of acknowledged independence. The commissioners tried by various arts to accomplish their purpose, but failed, and, after issuing an angry and threatening manifesto, sailed for England in October. After the total destruction of the Southern army near Camden, in August, 1780, some of the Southern members of Congress, alarmed at the progress of the British, became so anxious for the aid of Spain that they proposed, in October, 1780, to abandon all claims to the navigation of the Mississippi as the price of a Spanish subsidy and alliance. Meanwhile (January, 1781) the Empress of Russia had been joined by the Emperor of Germany in an offer of mediation. Great Britain, getting wearied of the war, had accepted the offer. These facts being communic
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pinckney, Thomas 1750-1828 (search)
Pinckney, Thomas 1750-1828 Diplomatist; born in Charleston, S. C., Oct. 23, 1750; educated in England, and was admitted to the bar in 1770. He joined the army in 1775; became a major and aide to General Lincoln, and afterwards to Count d'estaing in the siege of Savannah. He was distinguished in the battle at Stono Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. Ferry, and was aide to General Gates in the battle near Camden, where he was wounded and made prisoner. In 1792 he was sent as minister to Great Britain, and in 1794 to Spain, where he negotiated the treaty of St. Ildefonso, which secured Thomas Pinckney. to the United States the free navigation of the Mississippi River. In 1799 he was a member of Congress, and in March, 1812, President Madison appointed him commander of the Sixth Military District. His last military service was under General Jackson at the last decisive battle with the Creeks at Horseshoe Bend. He died in Charleston, S. C., Nov. 2, 1828.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rawdon, Lord Francis 1754- (search)
nfantry in 1775. After the battle of Bunker Hill be became aide to Sir Henry Clinton, and was distinguished in several battles near New York City in 1776. In 1778 he was made adjutant-general of the army under Clinton, and raised a corps called the Volunteers of Ireland. He was distinguished for bravery in the battle at Monmouth, and was afterwards, when Charleston fell before Clinton, placed in command of one of the divisions of the army to subjugate South Carolina. He bravely defended Camden against Greene, and relieved Fort Ninety-six from siege by that officer. Soon afterwards he went to Francis Rawdon (from an English print.) Charleston, and sailed for England. While on a return voyage, he was captured by a French cruiser. On March 5, 1783, he was created a baron, and made aide-decamp to the King, and in 1789 he succeeded to the title of his uncle, the Earl of Huntingdon. In 1793 he became Earl of Moira and a major-general, and the next year served under the Duke of Yor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Red River expedition. (search)
A. J. Smith's The fleet passing the Dam. troops returned to Mississippi. A strong confronting force of Confederates had kept Steele from co-operating with the expedition. He had moved from Little Rock with 8,000 men, pushed back the Confederates, and on April 15 had captured the important post at Camden, on the Wachita River; but after a severe battle at Jenkinson's Ferry, on the Sabine River, he had abandoned Camden and returned to Little Rock. So ended the disastrous Red River campaign.A. J. Smith's The fleet passing the Dam. troops returned to Mississippi. A strong confronting force of Confederates had kept Steele from co-operating with the expedition. He had moved from Little Rock with 8,000 men, pushed back the Confederates, and on April 15 had captured the important post at Camden, on the Wachita River; but after a severe battle at Jenkinson's Ferry, on the Sabine River, he had abandoned Camden and returned to Little Rock. So ended the disastrous Red River campaign.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rocky Mount, skirmish at (search)
Rocky Mount, skirmish at When Gates was marching on Camden, S. C., in July, 1780, Col. Thomas Sumter first appeared in power on the View at Rocky Mount. borders of the Catawba River. He had gathered a considerable force, and on July 30 he left Major Davie's camp, crossed to the right bank of the Catawba, and proceeded cautiously but swiftly to attack a British post at Rocky Mount. The British commander, warned of his approach by a Tory, was prepared. A sharp skirmish ensued, and Sumter was repulsed. The site of this battle is near the right bank of the Catawba River. The view in the picture is in a northeasterly direction, looking towards Lancaster district.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rusk, Thomas Jefferson 1802-1856 (search)
Rusk, Thomas Jefferson 1802-1856 Legislator; born in Camden, S. C., Aug. 8, 1802; removed to Texas in 1835; was appointed the first minister of war of the republic of Texas. He took an active part in the war between Texas and Mexico, and, upon the annexation of Texas, was elected United States Senator in 1846. He died in Nacogdoches, Tex., July 29, 1856.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rutherford, Griffith 1731- (search)
Rutherford, Griffith 1731- Military officer; born in Ireland, about 1731. A resident of western North Carolina, he represented Rowan county in the convention of Newbern in 1775. He led a force against the Cherokees in 1776, and was appointed by the Provincial Congress a brigadier-general in April of that year. He commanded a brigade at the battle near Camden; was made a prisoner, and afterwards commanded at Wilmington, when the British evacuated. He was State Senator in 1784, and soon afterwards emigrated to Tennessee, where, in 1794, he was a member of the council, and where he died about 1800.
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