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ally and absolutely renounced. The poor quibble of double allegiance must be disavowed. An American--and not a New Yorker, nor a Virginian — is the noble title by which we are to live, and which you, my young friends, must, in your respective spheres, contribute to make live, however it may cost in blood and money. Go forth, then. my young friends — go forth as citizens of the Great Continental American Republic — to which your first, your constant, your latest hopes in life should attach — and abating no jot of obedience to Municipal or State authority within the respective limits of each — bear yourselves always, and everywhere, as Americans — as fellow-countrymen of Adams, and Ellsworth, and Jay, and Jefferson, and Carroll, and Washington, and Pinckney — as heirs of the glories of Bunker Hill, and Saratoga, and Monmouth, and Yorktown, and Eutaw Springs, and New Orleans, and suffer no traitor hordes to despoil you, of such rich inheritance or so grand and gloriou
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
Oct. 7, 1780 Fish Dam FordNov. 18, 1780 BlackstocksNov. 20, 1780 CowpensJan. 17, 1781 GuilfordMar. 15, 1781 Hobkirk's HillApril 25, 1781 Ninety-six (Siege of)May and June 1781 Augusta (Siege of)May and June 1781 JamestownJuly 9, 1781 Eutaw SpringsSept. 8, 1781 Yorktown (Siege of)Sept. and Oct. 1781 naval engagements. Hampton, Va. (British fleet repulsed)Oct. 24, 1775 Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor (British fleet repulsed)June 28, 1776 Fort Stony Point, on the Hudson (captured byOct. 7, 1780 Fish Dam FordNov. 18, 1780 BlackstocksNov. 20, 1780 CowpensJan. 17, 1781 GuilfordMar. 15, 1781 Hobkirk's HillApril 25, 1781 Ninety-six (Siege of)May and June 1781 Augusta (Siege of)May and June 1781 JamestownJuly 9, 1781 Eutaw SpringsSept. 8, 1781 Yorktown (Siege of)Sept. and Oct. 1781 naval engagements. Hampton, Va. (British fleet repulsed)Oct. 24, 1775 Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor (British fleet repulsed)June 28, 1776 Fort Stony Point, on the Hudson (captured by
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Campbell, Richard 1776- (search)
Campbell, Richard 1776- Military officer; born in Virginia; was made a captain in 1776; served with Gibson in Pittsburg, and with McIntosh against the Ohio Indians in 1778; promoted lieutenantcolonel; and while leading the charge at Eutaw Springs which forced the British to retreat received a wound from which he died Sept. 8, 1781. A few hours after the battle, on hearing that the British were defeated, he exclaimed, I die contented.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eutaw Springs, (search)
rangeburg, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart. Rawdon had left these troops in Stuart's charge and returned to England. Stuart, who had been joined by the garrison of Fort Ninety-six, immediately retreated, on the approach of Greene, to Eutaw Springs, 40 miles eastward, and there encamped. Greene pursued so stealthily that Stuart was not fully aware that the Americans were after him until they were close upon him, at dawn on the morning of Sept. 8, 1781. Greene moved in two columns, the centre of the first composed of North Carolina militia, with a battalion of South Carolina militia on each flank, commanded Eutaw Springs. respectively by Marion and Pickens. The second consisted of North Carolina regulars, led by General Sumner, on the right; an equal number of Virginians, under Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell, in the centre; and Marylanders, commanded by Col. O. H. Williams, on the left. Lee's Legion covered the right flank, and Lieutenant-Colonel Henderson's troops cove
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Greene, Nathanael 1742- (search)
ught order and strength out of confusion, and soon taught Cornwallis that a better Nathanael Greene. general than Gates confronted him. He made a famous retreat through Carolina into Virginia, and, turning back, fought the British army at Guildford Courthouse, N. C., March 15, 1781. Greene then pushed into South Carolina, and was defeated by Lord Rawdon in the battle of Hobkirk's Hill, April 25. Soon afterwards he besieged the fort of Ninety-Six, and on Sept. 8 gained a victory at Eutaw Springs, S. C., for which Congress gave him thanks, a British standard, and a gold medal. Expelling the British from the Southern country, Greene returned to Rhode Island at the close of the war. Congress presented him with two pieces of artillery. The State of Georgia gave him a fine plantation a few miles from Savannah, where he settled in the fall of Greene's medal. 1785, and died June 19, 1786. South Carolina also gave him a valuable tract of land. A monument dedicated jointly to Greene a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howard, John eager 1752-1827 (search)
ryland and Delaware troops, to serve in the Southern Department. In Gates's defeat, near Camden, he participared, and he led the Continental infantry in the battle of the Cowpens, at one time holding in his hands the swords of seven surrendered British officers. For his conduct there Congress voted him a silver medal. It was the first occasion during the Revolutionary War in which the bayonet was effectively used. He was distinguished in the battles of Guildford, Hobkirk's Hill, and Eutaw Springs, and was severely wounded in the latter engagement After the war he married a daughter of Chief-Justice Chew, of Pennsylvania He was a member of Congress (1787-88), and governor of Maryland from 1789 to 1792. Colonel Howard was a member of the Maryland Senate in 1795, and United States Senator from 1796 to 1803. He was named by Washington for one of his brigadier-generals in 1798. When Baltimore was threatened in 1814, Howard placed himself at the head of aged men armed for its defence
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Medals. (search)
Stony PointSilver. Sept. 24, 1779Maj. Henry LeeSurprise of Paulus HookGold. Nov. 3, 1780John PauldingCapture of AndreSilver. Nov. 3, 1780David WilliamsCapture of AndreSilver. Nov. 3, 1780Isaac Van WartCapture of AndreSilver. March 9, 1781Brig.-Gen. Daniel MorganVictory of the CowpensGold. March 9, 1781Lieut.-Col. William A. WashingtonVictory of the CowpensSilver. March 9, 1781Lieut.-Col. John E. HowardVictory of the CowpensSilver. Oct. 29, 1781Maj.-Gen. Nathanael GreeneVictory at Eutaw SpringsGold. Oct. 16, 1787Capt. John Paul JonesCapture of the Serapis, 1779Gold. March 29, 1800Capt. Thomas TruxtonAction with the Vengeance (French)Gold. March 3, 1805Com. Edward PrebleTripoliGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Isaac HullCapture of the GuerriereGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Jacob JonesCapture of the FrolicGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Stephen DecaturCapture of the MacedonianGold. March 3, 1813Capt. William BainbridgeCapture of the JavaGold. Jan. 6, 1814Lieut. Edward R. McCallCapture of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, (search)
line active in battle of Monmouth......June 28, 1778 Legislature votes officers of the Maryland line who serve through the war, and their widows, half-pay during life, to commence after seven years pay voted by Congress......1779 Bill to confiscate British property passes both Houses......October, 1780 Maryland line, under Major-General De Kalb, engage in the battles of Camden (where De Kalb was killed), Cowpens, Guilford Court-house, Hobkirk's Hill, assault of Ninety-six, and Eutaw Springs......1780-81 Maryland, to secure rights to Western lands, delays signing the Articles of Confederation until, with other States, Virginia cedes lands northwest of the Ohio to the United States in January, 1781; Maryland delegates, John Hanson and Daniel Carroll, sign the articles......March 1, 1781 Officers of Maryland line organize State Society of the Cincinnati at Annapolis, Major-General Smallwood president......Nov. 21, 1783 United States Congress meets at Annapolis......No
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Carolina, (search)
then a boy of fourteen years, takes part in the engagement......Jan. 17, 1781 Francis Marion, appointed brigadiergeneral by Governor Rutledge in July, 1780, joins General Greene on his return to the State......April, 1781 Battle of Hobkirk's Hill; Americans under General Greene retreat before an attack of the British under Lord Francis Rawdon......April 25, 1781 British evacuate Fort Ninety-six......June 21, 1781 Indecisive battle between General Greene and Colonel Stuart at Eutaw Springs, each claiming a victory......Sept. 8, 1781 Governor Rutledge issues a proclamation offering pardon to the Tories in South Carolina......Sept. 27, 1781 General Assembly convenes at Jacksonboro on the Edisto River, January, elects John Matthews governor, and passes laws for confiscating the estates of Tories......February, 1782 British evacuate Charleston......Dec. 14, 1782 Charleston (hitherto Charlestown) incorporated......1784 South Carolina relinquishes to Georgia her
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, William 1752- (search)
Washington, William 1752- Military officer; born in Stafford county, Va., Feb. William Washington. 28, 1752; son of Baily Washington, a kinsman of George Washington; entered the military service early in the Revolutionary War, becoming a captain in the Virginia line under Mercer. He was in Silver medal awarded to William Washington. the battle on Long Island, and was badly wounded at Trenton, but engaged in the battle at Princeton. Lieutenant-colonel of Baylor's dragoons, he was with them when surprised at Tappan. In 1779-80 he was very active in South Carolina, in connection with General Morgan, and for his valor at the Cowpens, Congress gave him thanks and a silver medal. In Greene's famous retreat Colonel Washington was very efficient; so, also, was he at the battles of Hobkirk's Hill and Eutaw Springs. At the latter place he was made prisoner and remained so until the close of the war, when he married and settled in Charleston, where he died, March 6, 1810.
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