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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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March 4. The First East-Tennessee cavalry, Colonel Johnson, had a fight with a party of rebels led by Colonel Rogers, at a point on Harpeth River, near Chapel Hill, Tenn.; killed twelve, and captured seventy-two of the rebels, with all their horses and accoutrements. Majors Burkhart and Macy were in command of the National cavalry, all of whom passed through the engagement without injury.--The Thirty-seventh Congress of the United States terminated.--The sloop Ida was captured near Charlotte Harbor, Fla., by the blockading schooner James S. Chambers.--The Second New Hampshire regiment returned to Concord. A skirmish took place at Skeet, N. C., between a scouting detachment of National troops under the command of Captain Richardson, of the Third New York cavalry, and a party of rebel guerrillas, in which the latter were routed and dispersed. The Union party then advanced to Swan Quarter, where they encountered a superior body of rebels, but after a sharp fight of twenty mi
ign. To Buford was assigned the post of danger and responsibility. He, and he alone, selected the ground, says that trustworthy historian, upon which unforeseen circumstances were about to bring the two armies into Major-General Nathan Bedford Forrest, C. S. A. General Forrest was one of the born cavalry leaders. Daring and resourceful in every situation, he and his hard-riding raiders became a source of terror throughout the Mississippi Valley. He was born near the site of Chapel Hill, Tennessee, on July 31, 1821, attended school for about six months, became a horse and cattle trader, and slave trader at Memphis. He cast in his lot with the Confederacy and entered the army as a private in June, 1861. In July he organized a battalion of cavalry, of which he became lieutenant-colonel. He escaped from Fort Donelson when it surrendered to Grant, and as brigadier-general served in Kentucky under Bragg. Transferred to Northern Mississippi in November, 1863, Forrest was made ma
ict of Georgia, under Beauregard. He was sent with a brigade to the assistance of Johnston in the latter's attempt to keep Grant from Vicksburg, in May, 1863. In August, he was given a division in Hill's Corps, Army of Tennessee, and commanded the reserves at Chickamauga, after which he was in Hardee's Corps in the Chattanooga and Atlanta campaigns until he was killed at Decatur, near Atlanta, July 22, 1864. Lieutenant-General Nathan Bedford Forrest was born near the site of Chapel Hill, Tennessee, July 13, 1821, and became a slave-trader at Memphis. In the summer of 1861, he joined the Tennessee mounted rifles as private, and a month later raised and equipped a force of Confederate cavalry. He escaped with his battalion from Fort Donelson, and by the middle of 1862 he had become brigadier-general and was one of the most important officers in the Confederate army. At the head of his independent cavalry organization, he was active during Bragg's invasion of Kentucky and rema
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Tennessee, 1863 (search)
Grange to Salem, Miss.,, and Saulsbury, TennILLINOIS--7th Cavalry (1st Battalion). March 3: Skirmish, Bear CreekALABAMA--1st Cavalry. March 3-6: Expedition to Chapel Hill(No Reports.) March 3-8: Expedition from Murfreesboro to WoodburyILLINOIS--80th, 98th and 123d Infantry. INDIANA--18th and 19th Indpt. Batteries Light Arty.; 17, 17th, 31st, 35th and 38th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--7th Cavalry. WISCONSIN--24th Infantry. UNITED STATES--4th Cavalry; Battery "I" 4th Arty. March 5: Skirmish, Chapel HillOHIO--3rd Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--7th Cavalry. March 6: Skirmish, WoodburyINDIANA--17th Infantry. March 6-7: Reconnoissance from MurfreesboroughILLINOIS--21st, ons). April 11: Scout from SaulsburyILLINOIS--2nd Cavalry (Detachment). April 12: Skirmish, StewartsboroughIOWA--5th Cavalry (1 Co.). April 13: Skirmish near Chapel HillTENNESSEE--1st Cavalry (Detachment). April 15: Skirmish, SalisburyKANSAS--7th Cavalry. April 16: Skirmish near Eagleville(No Reports.) April 17-May 2: Raid fr
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
8. March to Bowling Green, Ky., October 20-November 2, thence to Mitchellsville November 6-7. Guard Tunnel till November 23. Moved to Cunningham's Ford, Cumberland River, November 23-25, and guard duty there till December 22, and at Gallatin till January 29, 1863. Moved to Murfreesboro, Tenn., January 29, and duty there till March 2. Nolensville February 15. Moved to Triune March 2. Nolensville Ford, Harpeth River, March 4. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Chapel Hill March 5. At Triune till June 23. Franklin June 4-5. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Tullahoma July 1. At Winchester, Tenn., till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-20. Rossville Gap September 21. Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., September 24-November 23. Chattanooga-Ringgold Ca
er 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Overall's Creek December 31. Stewart's Creek and Lavergne January 1, 1863. Conduct trains to Nashville and return. Insane Asylum January 3. Shelbyville Pike January 5. Near Woodbury January 19 (Cos. A, D, E and F ). Bradysville Pike, near Murfreesboro, January 23. Expedition to Liberty, Auburn and Alexandria February 3-5. Vaught's Hill, Milton, February 18. Bradysville March 1. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Chapel Hill March 5. Rutherford Creek March 10-11. Woodbury Pike March 27 (2nd Battalion). Expedition from Readyville to Woodbury April 2 (2nd Battalion). Smith's Ford April 2. Expedition from Murfreesboro to Auburn, Snow Hill, Liberty, etc., April 2-6. Snow Hill, Woodbury, April 3. Liberty April 3. Franklin April 9-10. Schoeppe House May 9. Reconnoissance from Lavergne May 12. Middleton May 21-22. Scout to Smithville June 4-5. Snow Hill June 4. Smithville Ju
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
anklin December 12. Near Nashville December 24. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Lavergne December 26-27. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Overall's Creek December 31. Manchester Pike and Lytle's Creek January 5, 1863. Expedition to Franklin January 31-February 13. Unionville and Rover January 31. Murfreesboro February 7. Rover February 13. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Unionville and Rover March 4. Chapel Hill March 5. Thompson's Station March 9. Rutherford Creek March 10-11. Snow Hill, Woodbury, April 3. Franklin April 10. Expedition to McMinnville April 20-30. Middletown May 21-22. Near Murfreesboro June 3. Operations on Edgeville Pike June 4. Marshall Knob June 4. Shelbyville Pike June 4. Scout on Middleton and Eagleville Pike June 10. Scout on Manchester Pike June 13. Expedition to Lebanon June 15-17. Lebanon June 16. Middle Tennessee or Tullahom
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Tennessee Volunteers. (search)
pherdsville, Ky., and return to Louisville, Ky., thence moved to Nashville, Tenn., January 9-17, 1863. Reconnoissance to Franklin and Brentwood and occupation of Franklin February 2, 1863. Moved to Concord Church February 2, and duty there till February 28. Expedition from Lexington to Clifton February 17-20 (Detachment). Moved to Triune February 28, and duty there till June. Petersburg March 2. Action at Harpeth River, near Triune, March 8. Franklin April 10. Near Chapel Hill April 13 (Detachment). Rigg's Cross Roads April 16. College Grove April 26 (Detachment). Expedition to Thompson's Station May 2. Rover May 5. Jordan's Store May 30. Franklin June 4. Triune June 9. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Eaglesville, Uniontown and Rover June 23. Middletown June 24. Fosterville, Guy's Gap and Shelbyville June 27. Beth-page Bridge, Elk River, July 1-2. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. At
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
h to Savannah, Tenn., March 20-April 8. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Buell's operations on the Memphis & Charleston Railroad in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee June to August, 1862. March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 21-September 26. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-15. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8. March to Nashville, Tenn., November 4-17. Duty there and at Murfreesboro till June, 1863. Expedition to Chapel Hill March 3-6. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Harpeth River near Triune March 8. Action at Franklin June 4. Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-21. Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., September 24-November 23. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-2
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
at fervor and power. The young believers were organized into private prayermeetings, which met at seven o'clock in the morning. Sometimes, says Mr. Redding, I would quietly unpeg the door and walk in while the young men were engaged in their delightful meetings, and would find the young convert of the previous night leading in prayer, and earnestly invoking God's blessing upon his impenitent comrades. In the evening, at the close of dress-parade, the drums would beat the Church call on Chapel Hill. It was a glorious sight, just as the setting sun bathed the mountain tops in his ruddy light, to see those toil-worn veterans gathering in companies and marching to the house of the Lord. From all directions, down from the hills, out of the woods, across the valleys, they came, while the gallant Colonel McCullough, of the Sixteenth South Carolina, himself a godly man, leads his men to the place of worship. Then the Twenty-fourth South Carolina falls into line, led by their chaplain, M
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