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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 23, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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ou of the success with which he has met; how he has overrun the entire section of the State east of a line drawn from Cumberland Gap to Cleveland; how he had gathered within his lines all that was valuable in supplies of food; and how he has made hishut the army of the Ohio within the narrow precincts of its early conquests; has cut off communication between it and Cumberland Gap, and only awaits the opening of spring to enter upon the campaign reinvigorated and supplied for active operations. as been unfortunate in its commanders Gen. Burnside tendered his resignation immediately after rescuing Knoxville and Cumberland Gap from the rebel rule. While he continued in command, after his resignation had been sent to Washington, he had no foeas compelled to do so to maintain his position. Under his administration he has lost his lines of communication with Cumberland Gap, and barely maintained those with Chattanooga. Longstreet with his army, Isolated from all support, has out-manœuver