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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 10 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 2 0 Browse Search
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ur miles in advance. June, 27 We left Beech Grove, or Jacob's Store, this morning, at five o'clock, and conducted the wagon train of our division through to Manchester. Rosecrans and Reynolds are here. The latter took possession of the place two or three hours before my brigade reached it, and the former came up three hours after we had gone into camp. We are now twelve miles from Tullahoma. The guns are thundering off in the direction of Wartrace. Hardie's corps was driven from Fairfield this morning. My baggage has not come, and I am compelled to sleep on the wet ground in a still wetter overcoat. June, 28 My baggage arrived during the night, and this morning I changed my clothes and expected to spend the Sabbath quietly; but about 10 A. M. I was ordered to proceed to Hillsboro, a place eight miles from Manchester, on the old stage road to Chattanooga. When we were moving out I met Durbin Ward, who asked me where I was going. I told him. Why, said he, I thought,
d across-country to the left, and encamped that night at the little town of Millersburg, in the vicinity of Liberty Gap. I was directed to move from Millersburg, on Hoover's Gap — a pass in the range of hills already referred to, through which ran the turnpike from Murfreesboroa to Manchester-but heavy rains had made the country roads almost impassable, and the last of my division did not reach Hoover's Gap till the morning of June 27, after its abandonment by the enemy. Continuing on to Fairfield, the head of my column met, south of that place, a small force of Confederate infantry and cavalry, which after a slight skirmish Laiboldt's brigade drove back toward Wartrace. The next morning I arrived at Manchester, where I remained quiet for the day. Early on the 29th I marched by the Lynchburg road for Tullahoma, where the enemy was believed to be in force, and came into position about six miles from the town. By the 31st the whole army had been concentrated, in spite of many dif
unded must have been at least two hundred, including those drowned in the river. Generals Wheeler and Martin had to take to the water with the other fugitives. The Adjutant of the Eighth confederates reined in his horse to allow the two generals to take their dip before him, but his doing so threw him into the hands of the Third Indiana. I bivouacked near the railroad station. June 28.--Returned to within two miles of Guy's Gap. June 29.--Reveille at one o'clock A. M. Marched to Fairfield via Shelbyville. The Fifth Iowa and Third Indiana were detached and left with General Granger at Guy's Gap. June 30.--Marched to within four miles of Manchester. July 1.--Returned to Walker's Mills, within three miles of Manchester. July 2.--Reveille at one A. M. Waited four hours for the First division to move. Marched to Elk River, where I rejoined the Second division. The enemy showed himself in force, the Seventh Pennsylvania skirmished with him a short time. Camped one mi
es, during which time I was able to learn, to some extent, the effect of our previous day's work. The ground was profusely covered with blood, mutilated clothing, and pieces of wheels and ammunition-chests. A short distance from here were nineteen dead rebels. I afterward learned from a prisoner that one of our shells burst, killing two and wounding eighteen of their infantry. He also stated that they had one piece and one caisson disabled. I then moved forward with the brigade, to Fairfield, Tenn., where we halted about an hour, and then moved forward about six miles in the direction of Manchester, Tenn., where we halted for supper. We had just fed our horses and got some coffee over the fire, when orders came to get ready to move at once --over went the kettles of coffee, and every man was at his post, and in ten minutes we were ready to march. Proceeding toward Manchester, we forded Duck River, and about two o'clock on the morning of the twenty-eighth, we encamped in the sout
ance from them, and left us to hold the bridge across the Garrison fork and the debouch of the Fairfield road. For the details of this fight, I refer to the reports of the immediate commanders of thance to test our strength on McCook's front or mass on the flank of the Fourteenth corps, near Fairfield, the orders for June twenty-fifth were as follows: Major-General Crittenden to advance to Lels on the flank of his advance position at the forks of the road, and drive the rebels toward Fairfield. General McCook to feign and advance, as if in force, on the Wartrace road, by the Liberty ng was finally in position, and General Reynolds's division had advanced on the heights toward Fairfield, but did not attack the enemy, who appeared to show a disposition to contest our advance by thvisions cooperated in a gallant advance on the enemy, who after a short resistance fled toward Fairfield, near to which place our pickets were advanced, while Reynolds's divison and the baggage moved
's front, was surprised by Wilder's mounted brigade of Reynolds's division, and held against heavy odds till Reynolds could bring up his entire division and secure it. On the 27th, Rosecrans had his headquarters in Manchester, with Thomas's corps around him; Sheridan, with the right division of McCook's corps, arriving next morning, and the rest of that corps during the 29th. The enemy, deceived and overpowered, had been forced back, with little more than smart, persistent skirmishing, to Fairfield. Manchester itself had been surprised by Wilder on the morning of that day. Granger had started June 23, 2 P. M. from Triune, on our extreme right, moving by Rover and Middleton, pushing back the enemy, by lively skirmishes at either place, to Christiana, on the road from Murfreesboroa to Shelbyville, where he was joined by Stanley; advancing June 27. thence on Guy's gap, covering Shelbyville, which was at first firmly held by the enemy; but, after two hours skirmishing, they sud
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
vance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. At Murfreesboro till June. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 24-July 7. Fairfield June 27. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-20. Siege of Chattanooga, Tennon Murfreesboro, Tenn., December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. At Murfreesboro till June. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 24-July 7. Fairfield June 27. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-20. Siege of Chattanooga Sep
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
Murfreesboro, Tenn., December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. At Murfreesboro till June. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. Fairfield June 27 and 29. Estill Springs July 2. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Reconnoissance from Cowan to Anderson July 11-14. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-Sepn Murfreesboro December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Duty near Murfreesboro till June. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. Fairfield June 27-29. Estill Springs July 2., Reconnoissance to Anderson July 11-14. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Bat
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
marched from Flat Creek across Duck River through Shelbyville and Wartrace to Fairfield and encamped on Garrison's Creek, near Hoover's Gap. Sunday, May 31. Preaof the Tennessee Conference. June 2. We organized a chaplains' meeting at Fairfield: Chairman, S. M. Cherry; Secretary, Dr. F. S. Petway. Present: Chaplains Rust, and they were soon eagerly received and read by our soldiers. Near Fairfield, Tennessee, Sunday, June 7, 1863. Dr. McFerrin preached to our brigade in the forenns of this command, and they have indications of a fine revival. Near Fairfield, Tennessee, Sunday, June 21. Chaplain Ellis preached to our brigade in the forenoonnd Fifteenth Arkansas Regiments were ordered to their commands. I hurried to Fairfield, and found our brigade was engaged. Soon we were busy with the wounded, and ed for our brigade; first camp service since we were broken up so suddenly at Fairfield over three weeks ago. July 16. Held prayer-meeting for Ninth Alabama.
nson's island, except Capt. Daniel Boone, Lieut. J. G. Crump and William McConnell, who swam ashore from the transport conveying them and made their escape. Capt. Jim Cravens and Lieuts. Paynor, W. W. Bailly and Wilson escaped through the lines and returned to their homes in Arkansas, where they re-entered the service in other commands. The Seventeenth Arkansas regiment (there was another of the same number afterward consolidated with the Twenty-first) was organized in August, 1861, at Fairfield, Yell county, under orders of the State military board, from nine companies. The field and staff officers were: Col. George W. Lemoyne, Lieut.-Col. S. W. Williams, Major Lawrence, of Danville, and Adjt. William A. Dowdle, of Conway county. The commanders of companies were: Company A, Capt. J. M. Dowdle, Conway county; Company B, Capt. Bryan B. King, Conway county; Company C, Captain Harsell, Pope county; Company D, Capt. John Mills, Yell county; Company Et Capt. John Perry, Johnson count
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