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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
spondency, for upon every breeze of intelligence from the West, for several weeks preceding, were borne to Richmond Grand Junction, Mississippi. tidings of disaster to the Confederate cause. There were desperate reasons why the most vigorous effoy the southern march of the Nationals; and conscriptions and impressments were commenced. Jackson, in Tennessee, and Grand Junction, Grand Junction was a very important point, being at the junction of the Charleston and Memphis Railway and the raGrand Junction was a very important point, being at the junction of the Charleston and Memphis Railway and the railway from New Orleans to Jackson, in Tennessee. It was only about two miles northward of the State of Mississippi. During all the time that the Confederates held that section of the country, Grand Junction was the scene of large gatherings of trooGrand Junction was the scene of large gatherings of troops. See page 348, volume I. on the southern border of that State; Corinth, in Mississippi, and Decatur, in Alabama, all of them along the line of the Charleston and Memphis Railway, that stretches from the Mississippi to the Atlantic seaboard — were
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
eries at Port Hudson, secured the mouth of the Red River, and the navigation of the Mississippi to Vicksburg, and, being at liberty to devote more time to the northern portion of his department, he took position, accordingly, not far south of Grand Junction. to move toward the Tennessee River at the beginning of September; not, however, without the knowledge of the vigilant Grant, who was prepared to meet them. When Bragg moved northward, supposing Rosecrans was crossing the Tennessee in pursity, he moved forward Sept. 29, 1862. in command of the combined forces (he ranked Price), numbering about twenty-two thousand men, and struck the Memphis and Charleston railway at Pocahontas, Oct. 1 1862. about half way between Corinth and Grand Junction. On the night of the 2d the Confederate Army bivouacked at Chewalla, only ten miles from Corinth. It was difficult for Rosecrans to determine whether Van Dorn's destination was Corinth, Bolivar, or Jackson. He was prepared for any emergenc
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
rant transferred his Headquarters from Jackson (Tennessee) to La Grange, a few miles West of Grand Junction, on the Memphis and Charleston railway. He had concentrated his forces for a vigorous movemthe railway at Garner's. Station, just north of Grenada, where the railways from Memphis and Grand Junction meet, and destroyed the road and bridges there. They then went northward to Oakland and Panla, on the Memphis road, and then struck across the country southeast to Coffeeville, on the Grand Junction road. having accomplished the object of their expedition, Hovey and Washburne returned to t Its loss was a paralyzing blow to the expedition, for Grant was. Compelled to fall back to Grand Junction, to save his Army from the most imminent peril, and perhaps from destruction. This left Genhe enterprise became known to Pemberton, and it was abandoned. Rumors of Grant's retreat to Grand Junction had reached Sherman, and he resolved to return to Milliken's Bend on the Mississippi. The t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
Lafayette, East-port, and other gun-boats rendezvoused, and immense power was immediately brought to bear on the cutting of the canal, and other operations of a vigorous siege. General Grant, as we have observed, hastened back to Memphis after the conference at Napoleon, and immediately commenced moving his troops, which had been gathered there after the disaster at Holly Springs, down the Mississippi, to assist in the siege of Vicksburg. These troops had been pushed to Memphis from Grand Junction as rapidly as possible, and were now reorganized and in readiness for other work. All these veterans of the Army of the Tennessee, excepting detachments left to hold posts in that State, and the divisions of Logan, were there, and with ample provisions and other supplies, they were now borne swiftly, on more than a hundred transports, upon the rapid current of the rising Mississippi, and were before Vicksburg at the beginning of February. Grant himself arrived at Young's Point on the 2