Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for Jacksborough (Tennessee, United States) or search for Jacksborough (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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d the troops been able to get up in time I am satisfied that we could have succeeded in capturing the whole force. On the arrival of the cavalry we marched to Jacksborough, distance 5 miles, and there overtook the rear guard of the cavalry; killed 1 man and captured Capt. Edward Winston, of the Corps of Sappers and Miners. We ho Mountains, yesterday surprised and captured, without the fire of a gun, I believe, the larger number of two companies of the First East Tennessee Cavalry near Jacksborough. Their force consisted of a regiment of infantry. Couriers who arrived last night bring the intelligence that they are moving in this direction. I have onear relationship to and from intimate association with many citizens who have fled the country and espoused the Federal cause, I am satisfied the capture near Jacksborough was the result of treachery. Pickets detailed from them cannot be relied on and even officers are not free from suspicion of more fidelity to the Federal than
during the day (the 22d) with considerable vigor, as well as from small-arms at long range, but with little effect. List of casualties omitted shows 5 men wounded. The loss of the enemy is not known, but during the night they withdrew, apparently in great consternation. A body of cavalry to protect their rear were the only troops of the Federal forces seen the next morning, and which it was impossible to cut off. Information which had reached the enemy of an expedition toward Jacksborough led them to believe that the garrison had been weakened to a great extent, and induced this demonstration. After feeling and ascertaining that it was in force, they retired. Their force was no other than Carter's brigade, estimated at about 4,000 to 6,000. Respectfully, your obedient servant, E. Kirby Smith, Major-General, Commanding. General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S. Army. No. 3.-reports of Col. James E. Rains, C. S. Army. headquarters, Cumberland Gap, March 2
left Knoxville at 4 p. m., with about 40 men from my company and the same number of Captain Bradley's, and proceeded to Clinton, where I was joined by 40 men of Captain Gillespie's company, under Lieutenant King. I marched all night, reaching Jacksborough about sunrise next morning. Five miles above Jacksborough, at Big Creek Gap, I left Captain Bradley, with his command, to reconnoiter the country between that point and Fincastle, 5 miles above Big Creek Gap. there to await furother ordeJacksborough, at Big Creek Gap, I left Captain Bradley, with his command, to reconnoiter the country between that point and Fincastle, 5 miles above Big Creek Gap. there to await furother orders. With the remainder of my command I pressed on to Woodson's Gap, 6 miles beyond Fincastle, where I detached Lieutenant Gibbs, of my company, with 10 men, to guard the road coming into Woodson's Gap from the direction of Clinch River. I then pressed forward with the remnant of my command to watch some passes a few miles above. In a short time a courier from Lieutenant Gibbs informed me that he had captured the advance guard of the tories, when I immediately changed direction and returned