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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
March to Knoxville, Tenn., September 10-26, and duty there till October 3. Action at Blue Springs October 10. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 24. Lenoir November 15. Campbell's Station November 16. Siege of Knoxville November 17-December 5. Camp at Blain's Cross Roads till January 8, 1864. Veterans marugust 3. Moved to Covington and Crab Orchard, Ky., August 3-24. March to Knoxville, Tenn., September 10-26. Action at Blue Springs October 10. Duty at Lenoir October 20 to November 14. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 24. Lenoir Station November 14. Action at Campbell's Station November 16. Siege of K. Moved to Covington, thence to Crab Orchard, Ky., August 4-30. March to Knoxville, Tenn., September 10-26. Action at Blue Springs October 10. Duty at Lenoir till November 14. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 23. Loudon Station November 14. Campbell's Station November 16. Siege of Knoxville November 1
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
le till August 12. Moved to Covington, Ky., August 12-22. Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 17. March over Cumberland Mountains into East Tennessee August 27-September 26. Action at Blue Springs October 10. At Lenoir till November 14. Campbell's Station November 16. Siege of Knoxville November 17-December 4. Pursuit of Longstreet December 5-24. Operations in East Tennessee till March, 1864. Moved to Annapolis, Md., March-April. Campaign fromon of Mississippi Central Railroad at Madison Station July 18-22. At Milldale till August 6. Moved to Crab Orchard, Ky., August 6-12. Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 17. Action at Blue Springs October 10. At Lenoir till November 15. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 23. Action at Campbell's Station November 16. Siege of Knoxville November 17-December 4. Repulse of Longstreet's assault on Fort Sanders November 29. Operations in East Tenne
ne 11 before the city, their colonel being in command of the brigade; and on the evacuation of Jackson the 35th Mass. in line of skirmishers were the first to enter the city, the 29th being the reserve. The losses of all these were small. Official War Records, 37, pp. 561, 573; 51, pp. 552, 553, 580. At Blue Springs, Tenn. (October 10), there was a skirmish without actual loss, but in which Major Goodell of the 36th Infantry, a most valuable officer, was severely wounded; another at Lenoir's, Tenn. (November 15), without loss; and one near Campbell's Station (November 16), in which the 29th and 36th lost slightly. In this case there was a sharp attack by Hood upon three small regiments (the 36th Mass., the 8th Michigan and the 45th Pennsylvania), which narrowly escaped capture, the 36th being at this time under command of Maj. (afterwards general) W. F. Draper. In the siege of Knoxville, Tenn., the 21st, 29th, 35th and 36th Infantry were all engaged, with small losses for each;
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., Index of Battles, etc., Mentioned in Preliminary Narrative. (search)
. (Oct. 13, 1864), 112. Jackson, Miss. (June 11, 1863), 107. James Island, S. C. (July 16, 1863), 84; (July 2-9, 1864), 89; (Feb. 10, 1865), 90. Kelly's Ford, Va. (Aug. 21, 1862), 69. Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. (June 9-30, 1864), 106. Kettle Run, Va. (Aug. 27, 1862), 69. Kinston, N. C. (Dec. 14, 1862), 48: (March 14, 1865), 50, 106. Knoxville, Tenn. (Nov. 17-Dec. 4, 1863), 107. Koch's Plantation, see Cox's Plantation. La Fourche Crossing, La. (June 21, 1863), 66. Lenoir, Tenn. (Nov. 15, 1863), 107. Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Nov. 24, 1863), 105. Lynchburg, Va. (June 17-18, 1864), 109. Malvern Hill, Va. (July 1, 1862), 54. Manassas or Bull Run 2d, Va. (Aug. 30, 1862), 69. Marye's Heights, Va. (Dec. 13, 1862), 77. Mechanicsville, Va. (June 26, 1862), 53. Memphis, Tenn. (June 6, 1861), 42. Mine, the, see Petersburg. Mine Run, Va. (Nov. 26-30, 1863), 104. Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Nov. 25, 1863), 106. Mobile Bay, Ala. (Aug. 5, 1864),
aster Wm. V. Hutchings of Gloucester. Boston Evening Journal, July 9, 1862, p. 4, col. 2. — – July. New Berne letter, with small items of news. Boston Evening Journal, July 14, 1862, p. 4, col. 5. Burrage, Henry Sweetser. Retreat from Lenoir's and siege of Knoxville. Atlantic, vol. 18, p 21. Butler, Gen. B. F. 1861. April. His nomination as general of volunteers opposed by army officers; despatch. Boston Evening Journal, April 16, 1861, p. 2, col. 6. — – In New York. Bos66. Lee's surrender. Synopsis of lecture. Gen. J. L. Chamberlain. Bivouac, vol. 1, p. 203. —What went on at Burkesville Junction, Va., April, 1865; from Boston Transcript, one-half column. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 6, p. 295. Lenoir's, Tenn. Retreat from, Nov., 1863. H. S. Burrage Atlantic, vol. 18, p. 21. Lester, C. E. U. S. ironclad Essex, July 6-Sept. 7, 1862. Harper's Mon., vol. 26, p. 397. a Lexington and Tyler, U. S. steamers. See Navy, Western flotilla, a
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
while recovering from his wound he was sick with whooping cough and mumps and was disabled until the following September. Then returning to duty he took part in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville in May, 1863, and was again wounded in the head. Falling into the hands of the enemy he was confined at Fort Delaware for three weeks and then paroled, but was not exchanged until September, 1863. He then went with Longstreet to Georgia and fought at Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Lenoir and Knoxville, Tenn. Returning to Virginia in the spring of 1864, he participated in the fighting at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, Mattaponi, North Anna River, Powhite Creek, Cold Harbor, and the battles before Petersburg, receiving his fourth wound at the latter place. Then being transferred to the north of the James river he was captured near Malvern Hill, July 25, 1864. A long period of imprisonment at Point Lookout followed and he did not regain his liberty until April, 18
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
Ark. 160, G10 Lee's Mill, Va. 15, 2, 15, 4 Reconnaissance toward, April 28, 1862 17, 2, 17, 3 Leesville, Mo. 152, E1; 161, F12 Leetown, Ark.: Battle of, March 7, 1862. See Pea Ridge, Ark. Leetown, W. Va. 43, 7; 69, 1; 74, 1; 81, 4; 85, 6; 100, 1; 136, E6 Legare's Point, S. C. 4, 1; 131, 1 Legareville, S. C. 4, 1; 131, 1; 139, H4; 143, H13 Leighton, Ala. 24, 3; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, E4 Leitersburg, Md. 27, 1; 116, 2; 136, D7 Lenoir's, Tenn. 24, 3; 142, E2; 149, A13 Lewinsville, Va. 7, 1; 27, 1 Lewisburg, Ark. 47, 1; 135-A; 154, A2; 171 Lewisburg, W. Va. 30, 5; 81, 6; 84, 9; 135-A; 135-C, 1; 141, E12; 171 Lewisburg Pike, Tenn. 28, 5; 72, 1; 73, 3, 73, 5 Skirmish, April 4, 1863 28, 5 Lewis' Ford, Va. 3, 2; 5, 1; 94, 2; 137, H2 Lexington, Ky. 118, 1; 135-A; 141, E1; 150, A12; 151, F13; 171 Lexington, Miss. 135-A; 154, H10; 155, A10; 171 Lexington, Mo. 47, 1; 66, 1;
had conferred with General Wilson, of Grant's staff, and with Mr. Dana, of the War Department, whom Grant had sent to him for this purpose; and decided that he could better carry out Grant's views, by drawing Longstreet further away from the rebel army at Chattanooga, than by checking him at Loudon. Early on the morning of the 15th, therefore, Burnside withdrew from Loudon, and fell back leisurely in the direction of Knoxville, the trains being sent in advance. That night, he encamped at Lenoir; on the 16th, he again started for Knoxville, by way of Campbell's station. But, by this time, Longstreet had crossed the Tennessee, on a pontoon bridge brought up to Loudon; and, taking a shorter road, which Burnside ought to have held, endeavored to reach Campbell's station first, and thus cut off the national forces from Knoxville. Burnside had, with him, only about five thousand troops, and, making a forced march, he succeeded in reaching Campbell's station first; and at once took step
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
1, by Surgeon Hayden, Dec. 31, ‘62, Foard's Hospital, Chattanooga, April 30, ‘63, Academy Hospital, July 17, ‘63, ordered to report to General Polk, July 31, ‘63, Lenoir's Cavalry, Oct. 31, ‘63, Hindman's Division Hospital, Feb. 29, ‘64, 9th Mississippi Battalion, April 30, ‘64, 34th Alabama Regiment. Gordon, Gilbert E., Surgeo, ordered to Gen. Withers, Dec. 31, ‘62, 24th Alabama. March 6, ‘64, ordered to report to Surgeon S. H. Stout. Jones, John P., Assistant Surgeon. Dec. 31, ‘62, Lenoir's Cavalry, July 17, ‘63, relieved with Lenoir's Cavalry and ordered to report to S. H. Stout. Johnson, Jno. M., Surgeon. Aug. 25, ‘62, ordered to report to GeLenoir's Cavalry and ordered to report to S. H. Stout. Johnson, Jno. M., Surgeon. Aug. 25, ‘62, ordered to report to Gen. Hardee, Dec. 24, ‘62, Chief Surgeon Cleburne's Division. Nov. 1, ‘63, reported from Mississippi. Johnson, Asa A., Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank from July 23, ‘62. Jan. 31, ‘63, 45th Alabama. Jones, John C., Surgeon, born in Laurence county, Ala., March 10, 1837. His parents, T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
., Florida. Lamar, C. A., Ga., Columbus, Ga., 1865. Lane, R. W., Ala., Huntsville, Ala. Lane, G. H., Capt., Va., 1862. Latane, W., Capt., Va., Old Church, Va., 1862. Latane, J., Lt., Va., Washington, D. C., 1864. Latham, R. P., Lt., Va., Culpeper C. H., Va., 1862. Laurens, J., Navy, Charleston, S. C., 1865. Leftwich, J. W., Surg., Va., Pittsylvania Co., Va. Leigh, J. R., Lt., Col., Va., Corinth, Miss., 1863. Leigh, R. W., Lt., Col., Va., Corinth, Miss., 1863. Lenoir, W. H., Tenn., Bowling Green, 1861. Lewis, G. N., Ala., Sharpsburg, Md., 1862. Lewis, J., Lt., W. Va., Winchester, Va. Lindsay, J. W., Va. Love, R. T., Va., Seven Pines, Va., 1862. Lowry, J. M., Va., Richmond, Va., 1864. Luckett, F. E., Surg., Va., Richmond, Va., 1863. Luckett, L. M., Va., Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862. Lyles, W. B., Capt., S. C., Seven Pines, Va., 1862. MacLeod, F. H., Fla., 1863. Magruder, J. B., Col., Va., Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Magruder, J. W.,
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