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isville, with its immense resources, was the immediate object of this gigantic raid, though Cincinnati was thought to be also within its purview. Crossing Aug. 24. the Tennessee at Harrison, a few miles above Chattanooga, with 36 regiments of infantry, 5 of cavalry, and 40 guns, Bragg traversed the rugged mountain ridges which hem in the Sequatchie Valley, passing through Dunlap, Aug. 27. Pikeville, Aug. 30. Crossville, Sept. 1. masking his movement by a feint with cavalry on McMinnville, but rapidly withdrawing this when its purpose was accomplished, and pressing hurriedly northward, to Kentucky; which he entered on the 5th. Kirby Smith, with his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up w
h a loss of 63 killed and some 200 or 300 wounded, including himself. Hall's entire loss was but 55. Franklin, being occupied by a Union force of 4,500 men, under Gen. Gordon Granger, Van Dorn, with a superior force, assailed, April 10. with intent to capture it; but was easily beaten off, with a loss of 200 or 300, including 80 prisoners; our loss being 37 only. A few days later, Maj.-Gen. J. J. Reynolds pushed out, April 20. with his division and two brigades of cavalry, to McMinnville; whence he drove out Morgan, talking 130 prisoners, destroying a large amount of Rebel store;, and returning April 26. without loss. Col. Watkins, 6th Kentucky, with 500 cavalry, surprised April 27. a Rebel camp on the Carter's creek pike, 8 miles from Franklin; capturing 140 men, 250 horses and mules, and destroying a large amount of camp equipage. Col. A. D. Streight, 51st Indiana, at the head of 1,800 cavalry, was next dispatched April 29. by Rosecrans to the rear of Bra
n roads: the 14th corps, Gen. Thomas, in the center, toward Manchester; the 21st, Gen. Crittenden, on our left, toward McMinnville; the 20th, Gen. A. D. McCook, directly on Shelbyville; Gen. Gordon Granger's reserve division supporting both the 14thht to Pelham on the left, the General kept his main body behind the Cumberland mountains, on a line from Winchester to McMinnville, while his engineers repaired the railroad down to Stevenson; when the East Tennessee road was in like manner repairedile Crittenden's corps, on our left, advanced in three columns, under Wood, Van Cleve, and Palmer, from Manchester and McMinnville, across the Sequatchie valley at different points, moved directly on Chattanooga, the remaining Rebel stronghold in Te closed it; and the enemy moved off during the night, while McCook had no orders to pursue him. Wheeler next struck McMinnville, in the heart of Tennessee, which, with 600 men, a train of wagons, and one of cars, was surrendered to him without a
cavalry, with 2 guns, under Brig.-Gen. Lyon, by our right across the Cumberland to break up the Louisville railroad in Thomas's rear. Lyon was manifestly too weak to effect any thing of importance. He took Hopkinsville, Ky., and was soon afterward attacked, near Greensburg, by Lagrange's brigade, and worsted; losing one of his guns and some prisoners; hurrying thence, sharply pursued, by Elizabethtown and Glasgow to Burkesville, where he recrossed the Cumberland, and raced southward by McMinnville and Winchester, Tenn., to Larkinsville, Alabama; thence moving east and attacking Jan. 10, 1865. a petty post at Scottsboroa, where he was repulsed and his command scattered: getting over the Tennessee with a remnant of 200 men, but losing his last gun. Being still pursued, he fled to a place known as Red hill; where his bivouac was surprised Jan. 14. by Col. W. J. Palmer, 15th Pa. cavalry, and 100 of his men taken. Lyon escaped, after surrendering, by seizing a pistol, shooting a
ston, N. C., 80. Kirksville Mo., 35. Knoxville, Tenn., 432. Lavergne, Tenn., 281. Lawrence. Kansas, 450. Lebanon, Ky., 405. Lewisburg, Va., 140. Little Osage, Mo., 561. London, Ky., 213. Lovejoy's, Ga., 635; 690. Lynehburg, Va., 601. Macon, Ga., 634; 691. Manassas Gap, Va., 601. do. Junction, Va., 180. Mansura., La., 551. Marion. Va., 688. Marks's Mill, Ark., 553. Martinsburg., Va., 606. Maysville. Mo., 37. McConnellstown, Pa., 606. McDowell, Va., 133. McMinnville, Tenn., 285. Memphis. Tenn., 56; 622. Middletown, Va., 370. Milford, Mo., 26. Milton, Tenn., 284. Mine Explosion, Va., 599. Mine Run, Va., 401. Mitchell's Creek, Ala., 721. Montevallo, Ala., 717. Moorefield, W. Va., 607. Morgarzia:. La., 340. Morristown, Tenn., 624. Mossy Creek, Tenn., 623. Mount Sterling, Ky., 624. Munfordsville, Ky., 215. Murfreesboroa, Tenn., 212. Newborn. N. C., 482. New Bridge, Va., 141. New Creek, W. Va., 598. New Hope Church, Ga., 620 New Madrid
peatedly, they made daring raids, which carried them a long distance from their own army, and in which any small detachment was always liable to be cut off by the vigilant enemy which hovered around the flanks and rear of the raiding column. The cavalry of the Union Armies, including both Eastern and Western, lost 10,596 officers and men killed or mortally wounded in action, and about 26,490 wounded who survived. Cavalry Corps. (Armies of the West.) Stone's River, Tenn. McMinnville, Tenn. Pea Ridge, Ark. lone Jack, Mo. Prairie Grove, Mo. Streight's Raid Middleton, Tenn. Franklin, Tenn. Triune, Tenn. Shelbyville, Tenn. Jackson, Tenn. Sparta, Tenn. Canton, Miss. Grenada, Miss. Grierson's Raid Graysville, Ga. Chickamauga, Ga. Carter's Station, Tenn. Murfreesboro Road, Tenn. Farmington, Tenn. Blue Springs, Tenn. Byhalia, Miss. Wyatt's Ford, Miss. Maysville, Ala. Blountsville, Tenn. Sweetwater, Tenn. Moscow, Tenn. Cleveland, Tenn. Ripley, Miss. Sa
222   B 1 7 8   20 20 211   C 1 8 9   14 14 215   D   4 4 3 20 23 190   E 1 9 10 1 18 19 196   F   10 10   9 9 217   G 1 14 15   12 12 202   H   7 7   11 11 203   I   6 6 1 17 18 214   K 2 3 5   24 24 206   L   7 7   14 14 201   M   8 8   10 10 201 Totals 8 94 102 5 185 190 2,502 battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Lebanon, Tenn., May 5, 1862 4 Unionville, Tenn., March 6, 1863 3 Lovejoy's Station, Aug. 20, 1864 10 McMinnville, Tenn., July 6. 1862 1 Snow Hill, Tenn., April 3, 1863 2 Vining's Station, Sept. 2, 1864 1 Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 13, 1862 11 Shelbyville, Tenn., June 27, 1863 9 Rome, Ga., Oct. 13, 1864 2 Verbilla, Tenn., Aug. 9, 1862 1 Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 18, 1863 6 Lead's X Roads, Nov. 1, 1864 2 Gallatin, Tenn., Aug. 21, 1862 2 Mission Ridge, Tenn., Sept. 21, 1863 2 Bardstown Ky., Dec. 29, 1864 2 Fayetteville, Tenn., Sept., 9. 1862. 1 Cumberland Mountains, Oct. 4, ‘63
tly alarmed lest an insurrection of the whites should occur in portions of the country around McMinnville, certain conservators of Southern rights despatched messengers, not long since, to Decatur, pee cavalry, to dragoon the threatening populace into submission. About the time they reached McMinnville, last Wednesday, Capt. Hastings was within four miles of the place, with fifty Ohio cavalry, giving some attention to the railroad between McMinnville and Murfreesboro. Capt. McHenry, who commanded the confederates, will be remembered as Governor Harris's Adjutant, in command at this city lepartment, I believe. When Capt. Hastings's presence was known among the leading secesh at McMinnville, they conceived the brilliant idea of bagging his entire command. Hon. Andrew Ewing, the invseparated from the stock by the furious manner in which he threw it away. When he arrived in McMinnville his valor was all gone. Making but a brief stay, to recruit his broken wind, he disappeared,
tly alarmed lest an insurrection of the whites should occur in portions of the country around McMinnville, certain conservators of Southern rights despatched messengers, not long since, to Decatur, pee cavalry, to dragoon the threatening populace into submission. About the time they reached McMinnville, last Wednesday, Capt. Hastings was within four miles of the place, with fifty Ohio cavalry, giving some attention to the railroad between McMinnville and Murfreesboro. Capt. McHenry, who commanded the confederates, will be remembered as Governor Harris's Adjutant, in command at this city lepartment, I believe. When Capt. Hastings's presence was known among the leading secesh at McMinnville, they conceived the brilliant idea of bagging his entire command. Hon. Andrew Ewing, the invseparated from the stock by the furious manner in which he threw it away. When he arrived in McMinnville his valor was all gone. Making but a brief stay, to recruit his broken wind, he disappeared,
exas Rangers in the fight. Knoxville, Tenn., July 21. To the Editors of the Richmond Enquirer: gentlemen: Another most brilliant victory is added to the history of our struggle for independence. Hereafter the thirteenth of July will be a day enshrined in the memory of Southern patriots. The most successful expedition had been planned, and for days was moving forward from Chattanooga. On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, the command, about sixteen hundred strong, left the vicinity of McMinnville, and after a march of fifty miles the gray dawn of the quiet Sabbath found the command all safely within two miles of Murfreesboro. Being halted here for a few minutes the arms were examined and the plan of attack agreed upon. Again the word was given and they moved forward. The Texas Rangers had led the advance during the entire march, and they still occupied the position. In a few minutes more a gun was fired and the pickets on the Woodbury pike were their prisoners. Then commenced
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