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Fayetteville with these Headquarters. Your Engineers should repair forthwith the roads and bridges on the route to Fayetteville and Salisbury, including, especially, a new bridge across Rocky River. In conclusion, I will again call your attention to the importance of saving surplus stores and supplies of all descriptions at Cheraw. To that end they should be held stored in trains, ready, at the proper moment, to be sent by rail, either in the direction of the Santee River or towards Manchester, or even to Camden, as may become most judicious, in view of known movements of the enemy. In case of a retrograde movement before the enemy, you will please remove or destroy all supplies of every kind liable to fall into his hands, in which connection I enclose General Orders No. 4, A. and I. G. Office. Respectfully, General, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard. Headquarters, Military division of the West, Charlotte, N. C., March 1st, 1865. Lieut.-Genl. W. J. Harde
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
erations in Northwest Mississippi June 13-22. (Detachment). Near Holly Springs, Miss., June 16-17 (Detachment). Jackson's Cross Roads, La., June 20. Manchester, Tenn., June 24 (Detachment). Near Bradysville, Tenn., June 24 (Co. C ). Regiment moved from Port Hudson, La., to Memphis, Tenn., July 19-28. Duty along Mbines May 31. Liberty Road June 4. Liberty June 10. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 24-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Manchester June 27. Dechard June 29. Pelham and Elk River Bridge July 2. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains andgade, Smithville, June 5. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 24-July 7. Big Spring Branch June 24. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Manchester June 27. Estill Springs July 2. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Expedition to Columbia and Centreville July. Expedition from Decherd,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
4. Expedition from Readyville to Woodbury April 2. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. At Manchester till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-Sepnnessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. Big Spring Gap June 24. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Manchester June 27. Raid on Bragg's communications July 1-August 16. Captured depot of supplies at Dechard. Passage on the Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Duty at Guy's Gap and Murfreesboro till September 5. At Manchester, Estill Springs, Cowan, Dechard, Tracy City, Christiana City and along Nashville & Chattanooga R. R. till April, 1864.rfreesboro till June. Action at Woodbury January 24. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. At Manchester till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-Sep
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
t Cripple Creek till June. Epedition to Woodbury April 2. Snow Hill, Woodbury,, April 3. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 24-July 7. At Manchester July 9 to August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River, and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Pea Vine Creek September Creek till June. Expedition to Woodbury April 2. Action at Snow Hill, Woodbury, April 3. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 24-July 7. At Manchester July 9 to August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Pea Vine Creek, Ga., Septe65. Woodbury January 24. At Murfreesboro till June. Scout from Clarksville May 20-22. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. At Manchester till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Ringgold September 11. Lee a
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
thence moved to Nashville, Tenn., February 26-March 2. Moved to Savannah, Tenn., and Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 20-April 9. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. At Corinth till June 22. March to Iuka, Miss., June 22-25, thence to Tuscumbia, Ala., June 27-29, and duty there till July 26. March to Athens, Ala., and Winchester, Tenn., July 26-August 7, thence to Dechard and Pelham Gap, Tenn., August 19-31, and to Manchester, Murfreesboro and Nashville, Tenn., September 1-7. March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg September 14-26. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-20. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8. March to Bowling Green, Ky., October 20-November 2, thence to Mitchellsville November 6-7. Guard Tunnel till November 23. Moved to Cunningham's Ford, Cumberland River, November 23-25, and guard duty there till December 22, and at Gallatin till January 29, 1863. Moved to Murfr
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Hampshire Volunteers. (search)
st New Hampshire Battery Light Artillery Organized at Manchester and mustered in September 21, 1861. Left State for Wa 4th New Hampshire Regiment Infantry. Organized at Manchester and mustered in September 18, 1861. Moved to Washingt 7th New Hampshire Regiment Infantry. Organized at Manchester and mustered in December 13, 1861. Left State for New 8th New Hampshire Regiment Infantry. Organized at Manchester and mustered in December 23, 1861. Left State for Bosew Hampshire Regiment Infantry. Regiment organized at Manchester and mustered in September 4, 1862. Left State and movhose Colors were brought into the city.) Provost duty at Manchester till June. Mustered out June 22, 1865. Veterans an Chandler's Company Militia Infantry. Organized at Manchester for 60 days May 9, 1864. Mustered out July 27, 1864. Houghton's Company Militia Infantry. Organized at Manchester for 90 days July 25, 1864. Mustered out September 16,
il 26. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Liberty Gap June 24-27. Manchester July 1. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains a At Readyville till June. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. At Manchester till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) CTenn., January 24 and April 4. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. At Manchester till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River, and Chickamauga (Ga.) Duty at Readyville till June. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. At Manchester till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Cmpson's Station June 2. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. Camp at Manchester till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Ohio, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to November, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to July, 1865. Service. 1st Battalion (Cos. A, D, H and I ) sent to Columbia, Tenn. Expedition to Rodgersville May 13-14. Lamb's Ferry, Ala., May 14. Advance on Chattanooga June 1. Sweeden's Cove June 4. Chattanooga June 7-8. Occupation of Manchester July 1. Paris July 19. Raid on Louisville & Nashville Railroad August 19-23. Huntsville Road, near Gallatin, August 21. Brentwood September 19-20. Near Perryville October 6-7. Chaplin Hills October 8. Expedition from Crab Orchard to Big Hill and Richmond October 21. 2nd Battalion (Cos. C, E, F and K ), under Gen. Dumont, in garrison at Nashville, Tenn., and scouting in that vicinity till November. 3rd Battalion (Cos. B, G. L and M ), in Duffield's Command, scout
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Pauline Cushman, the celebrated Union spy and scout of the Army of the Cumberland. (search)
forded a very clever ostensible reason for her travelling from headquarters to headquarters, and from place to place through the South. She was then instructed to make no confidants; not to talk too much; to make the same answers to all parties, and never to deviate from the story, when once framed. The search for her brother was to be the free and confessed object of her travels, and under this pretence she was to visit the rebel armies at Columbia, Shelbyville, Wartrace, Tullahoma, and Manchester. She was to make no direct inquiries of officers or others concerning the strength of the Confederate forces, movements, supplies, etc., but, in accepting the offers to ride and other attention which her personal attractions would probably secure her from officers, she was to keep her eyes open, and note every thing of importance which she might see. In the hospitals, she was to make such observations as she could, concerning the medical and hospital supplies, the number of sick and woun
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
d addresses from the Brooklyn pulpit, exhibits the growth of his opinions up to the moment when he began to advocate immediate abolition—a moment just before the Emancipation Proclamation itself. In educating public opinion upon slavery, Beecher had been unconsciously preparing his own armament for uses which he could not have guessed. While upon a vacation in England in the autumn of 1863 he was asked to speak on the war, and in the course of eleven days delivered almost impromptu, at Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Liverpool, and London, the series of addresses which gave him perhaps his greatest celebrity. Some of his audiences, notably those at Liverpool and Glasgow, were most tumultuous, and had actually to be conquered by the speaker. He conquered them, and won over the English middle class to sympathy with the Union cause. The determination of the British government to maintain strict neutrality is said to have been largely due to Beecher's effect upon public opinion. As
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