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The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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oyed him into their camp on Sunday morning, and forced him away on the cars on Sunday night. Mr. Sharpe is an old citizen of Columbus, a wealthy and highly respectable citizen. He is a lawyer by profession, and has held several public offices. The rebels did not burn the depot of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, nor did they destroy the track in the vicinity of Columbus. They left in too great haste to do any damage to this end of the road. I believe they destroyed a culvert or two beyond Moscow — about twenty miles from this place. The first thing that met the Federal eye on entering the camp to-day was an effigy marked, Bill Seward the d — d abolitionist. Not far distant from this was a similar representative of Tilghman the traitor, and a third one of Floyd the runaway. Trophies are numerous about town. There are no shot-guns or rifles to be had, however. They were all carried off, being rather scarce in the South just now. We counted fourteen guns — mostly thirty-two-p<
ch were unfinished, set on fire and floated over towards Norfolk, probably for the purpose of destroying the city. The firemen, however, towed them out and extinguished them. This work of destruction was accomplished on Saturday night, after the Federal troops had occupied Norfolk; and the incendiaries could be seen moving about in the darkness, with their pitch-pine flambeaux, like so many diabolical visitants. The scene strongly reminded the spectator of the panorama of the burning of Moscow, and with the immense flame that it threw forth made the scene one of terrible grandeur. Letter from General Wool. In a private letter to a friend in New-York, Gen. Wool wrote: The whole affair of the capture of Norfolk was done in twenty-seven hours. My course was by water twelve miles, and by land thirty-six, on horseback. My friend D----will tell you I am a hard rider. I do not think he will care to ride <*>ith me again to Hampton and back. I found by examination, on Fr
ar Middleburgh, he turned westward, and, moving so as to avoid too close contact with La Grange, took a course leading to Moscow. But on leaving Bolivar, a small force was sent in advance to find a safe crossing on Wolf River. This party came withias vulnerable. Forrest was immediately notified, and the main body made for that point, after throwing out a picket near Moscow to contest our advance from La Grange. They arrived, and commenced crossing at about two P. M., and by sunset they were all over — rebels, conscripts, beef cattle, and all. A part of Richardson's force took a position near Moscow to cover the rear of the retreating army, and Forrest proceeded toward Collierville. General Grierson was still at La Grange. As soon as The order was promptly executed, and as soon as possible the brigade was transferred to a point about two miles west of Moscow. It was now dark. A line of battle was immediately formed, and moved forward through the swamps and undergrowth with di
icer commanding the army sent to relieve him (General Johnston) had not failed to obey the positive orders to attack General Grant, which Mr. Seddon, then Secretary of War, had sent. If the same officer, who was upheld in command by the anti-administration party, had vigorously attacked Sherman at Atlanta when directed, the fortunes of war would have been changed, and Sherman hurled back to Nashville over a sterile and wasted country — his retreat little less disastrous than Napoleon's from Moscow. He did not do so, and was relieved; General Hood, a true and spirited soldier, taking his place. But the opportunity then was gone; and to this delay, more than to any other cause, the Southern people will attribute their overthrow whenever history comes to be truly written. In the statement this extract contains, that General J. E. Johnston failed to obey positive orders or directions to attack General Grant at Vicksburg, in 1863, or General Sherman at Atlanta, in 1864, there is a mis
d his army from Lovejoy's Station, just south of Atlanta, to the vicinity of Macon. Here Jefferson Davis visited the encampment, and on the 22d he made a speech to the homesick Army of Tennessee, which, reported in the Southern newspapers, disclosed to Sherman the new plans of the Confederate leaders. These involved nothing less than a fresh invasion of Tennessee, which, in the opinion of President Davis, would put Sherman in a predicament worse than that in which Napoleon found himself at Moscow. But, forewarned, the Federal leader prepared to thwart his antagonists. The line of the Western and Atlantic Railroad was more closely guarded. Divisions were sent to Rome and to Chattanooga. Thomas was ordered to Nashville, and Schofield to Knoxville. Recruits were hastened from the North to these points, in order that Sherman himself might not be weakened by the return of too many troops to these places. Hood, in the hope of leading Sherman away from Atlanta, crossed the Chattahoo
d his army from Lovejoy's Station, just south of Atlanta, to the vicinity of Macon. Here Jefferson Davis visited the encampment, and on the 22d he made a speech to the homesick Army of Tennessee, which, reported in the Southern newspapers, disclosed to Sherman the new plans of the Confederate leaders. These involved nothing less than a fresh invasion of Tennessee, which, in the opinion of President Davis, would put Sherman in a predicament worse than that in which Napoleon found himself at Moscow. But, forewarned, the Federal leader prepared to thwart his antagonists. The line of the Western and Atlantic Railroad was more closely guarded. Divisions were sent to Rome and to Chattanooga. Thomas was ordered to Nashville, and Schofield to Knoxville. Recruits were hastened from the North to these points, in order that Sherman himself might not be weakened by the return of too many troops to these places. Hood, in the hope of leading Sherman away from Atlanta, crossed the Chattahoo
from the moment we march would be at the mercy of the large cavalry force of the enemy. wounded in an arm, which was finally amputated. During the Civil War, Kearny had many excellent animals at his command, but his most celebrated steed was Moscow, a high-spirited white horse. On the battlefield, Moscow was conspicuous because of his white coat, but Kearny was heedless of the protests of his staff against his needless exposure. Another war-horse belonging to General Kearny was Decatur,Moscow was conspicuous because of his white coat, but Kearny was heedless of the protests of his staff against his needless exposure. Another war-horse belonging to General Kearny was Decatur, a light bay, which was shot through the neck in the battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines. Bayard, a brown horse, was ridden by Kearny at this battle, and his fame will ever stand in history through the poem by Stedman, Kearny at seven Pines. At the battle of Chantilly, Kearny and Bayard were advancing alone near the close of the struggle, when they met with a regiment of Confederate infantry. Bayard instantly wheeled and dashed from danger, with Kearny laying flat upon the horse's neck. A showe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Van Dorn's operations in Northern Mississippi--recollections of a Cavalryman. (search)
s cavalry were withdrawn from General Grant's front, and moved in the suspicious direction taken by.Van Dorn, that some intimation of the fact would reach him. The truth is, that if Colonel Murphy was censurable at all, it was for sharing in the feeling which seemed to pervade the whole army from General Grant down, that the march through the State was simply to be a walk over the track. Leaving Holly Springs, General Van Dorn moved north and crossed the Memphis and Charleston railroad at Moscow, for the purpose of making a diversion in favor of General Forrest, who was at the time engaged on an expedition in Middle and West Tennessee. After succeeding in monopolizing the attention of the enemy at various points for a day or two, we moved across to Bolivar, cut off and captured the pickets, and turned south just in time to avoid a heavy force of cavalry and artillery which Grant had sent in pursuit. We were now moving by the same route which the Federal cavalry had just followed g
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Forrest's report of operations in December, 1863. (search)
prisoners. I then moved a part of my force, under Colonel Faulkner, to Raleigh, and with the balance moved square to the left to Lafayette bridge, on Wolfe river. On the morning of the 27th my advance reached the bridge and attacked the bridge-guard; drove them back and put to flight the force at Lafayette station, killing several and capturing four or five prisoners. Cavalry advanced on me from Collierville, which we met and drove back. The enemy also sent reinforcements by train from Moscow, which we held in check until all my wagon train was safely across the river and on the road in the rear of my advance on Collierville. We closed the fight at Collierville about eight o'clock at night, driving the enemy into their fortifications. Not being able to hear anything of General Chalmers, and my men being worn out, I felt it to be prudent to retire, which I did, and my command is camped about seven miles west of this place. Another difficulty in the matter was that all my men
eded to the Confederacy. When Western Virginia was invaded he offered his services to go to her defense, and relying confidently on the sentiment, so strong in his own heart, of devotion to the state by all Virginians, he believed it was only needful for him to have a nucleus around which the people could rally to resist the invasion of their country. How sadly he was disappointed, and how bravely he struggled against adverse fortune, and how gallantly he died in the discharge of his duty, are memories which, though sad, bear with them to his friends the consolation that the manner of his death was worthy of the way in which he lived, and that even his life was an offering he was not unwilling to make for the welfare and honor of Virginia. He fell while commanding the rear guard, to save his retreating army, thus exemplifying the highest quality of man, self-sacrifice for others, and such devotion and fortitude as made Ney the grandest figure in Bonaparte's retreat from Moscow.
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