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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 138 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 108 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 45 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 40 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 24 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Purdy (Tennessee, United States) or search for Purdy (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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tired. The steamer Yankee visited the Navy-Yard at Washington, took on board a quantity of shell, and to-day, with the Anacostia, she proceeded to shell the rebel batteries at Aquia Creek. The enemy replied briskly with their guns, but failed to reach the Yankee, although they made several excellent line-shots. One shell struck but a short distance from the Yankee, in direct range with her wheel-house. Most of the shots were too high for the Anacostia, many of them passing over to a great distance. The heavy guns of the Yankee enabled her to lie off out of range, and drop her shells with precision into the batteries. After firing some time the Yankee and Anacostia hauled off, without being struck. Gen. Lew. Wallace's division went to Purdy, McNair County, Tenn., burned the bridge, and took up the track, on the railroad leading from Humboldt to Corinth, Miss., cutting off a train heavily laden with troops, which arrived while the bridge was burning.--N. Y. World, March 17.
. 152.) Mansfield Lovell, General late in command of the rebel forces at New Orleans, La., telegraphed to Richmond as follows from Camp Moore, La.:--Forts Jackson and St. Philip are still in good condition, and in our hands. The steamers Louisiana and McRae are safe. The enemy's fleet are at the city, (New Orleans), but they have not forces enough to occupy it. The inhabitants are stanchly loyal. Fort Livingston, La., was this day evacuated by the rebel forces.--National Intelligencer, May 10. Gen. Beauregard, at Memphis, Tennessee, issued the following address to the planters of the South :--The casualties of war have opened the Mississippi to our enemies. The time has therefore come to test the earnestness of all classes, and I call upon all patriotic planters owning cotton in the possible reach of our enemies to apply the torch to it without delay or hesitation. --Missouri Democrat. Purdy, Tennessee, was evacuated by the confederates.--Memphis Argus, April 29.
r Maria was captured near Charleston, S. C., by the U. S. steamer Santiago de Cuba.--N. Y. Tribune, May 6. A reconnoissance in force was made this morning from the right wing of the National army, near Pittsburgh, Tenn., four miles north of Purdy, on the Memphis and Ohio Railroad. The National troops met a force of rebel cavalry, who fled, and were pursued to Purdy. On taking possession of the town, the Union troops burned two bridges and threw a locomotive into the river. Three prisonPurdy. On taking possession of the town, the Union troops burned two bridges and threw a locomotive into the river. Three prisoners were taken, and the Unionists retired, having cut off all railroad communication between Corinth and the North.--Baltimore American, May 2. A. G. Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania, has issued a general order in acknowledgment of the gallantry of the Seventy-seventh regiment of infantry, Pennsylvania volunteers, Col. F. S. Stambaugh commanding, at Shiloh, Tennessee, and of the First regiment of cavalry, Pennsylvania volunteers, Col. George D. Bayard commanding, at Falmouth, Virginia. He