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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 138 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 108 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 45 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 40 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 24 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Purdy (Tennessee, United States) or search for Purdy (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 5: California, New York, and Kansas. 1857-1859. (search)
, in some instances making sacrifices and compromises. I made some few sales, and generally aimed to put matters in such a shape that time would bring the best result. Some of our heaviest creditors were John M. Rhodes & Co., of Sacramento and Shasta; Langton & Co., of Downieville; and E. H. Strange, of Murphy's. In trying to put these debts in course of settlement, I made some arrangement in Downieville with the law-firm of Spears & Thornton, to collect, by suit, a certain note of Green & Purdy for twelve thousand dollars. Early in April, I learned that Spears had collected three thousand seven hundred dollars in money, had appropriated it to his own use, and had pledged another good note taken in part payment of three thousand and fifty-three dollars. He pretended to be insane. I had to make two visits to Downieville on this business, and there made the acquaintance of Mr. Stewart, now a Senator from Nevada. He was married to a daughter of Governor Foote; was living in a small f
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. (search)
es back, three of the brigades covering the roads to Purdy and Corinth, and the other brigade (Stuart's) temporn a road leading from Savannah or Crump's Landing to Purdy. General C. F. Smith remained back at Savannah, ilearn, there are five regiments of rebel infantry at Purdy; at Corinth, and distributed along the railroad to Iey, retire, again fire and retire. The force on the Purdy road attacked and driven by Major Bowman yesterday, about five companies of Tennessee cavalry, sent from Purdy about 2 P. M. yesterday. I hear there is a force M.--Just back; have been half-way to Corinth and to Purdy. All right. Have just read this letter, and approv from an extensive reconnoissance toward Corinth and Purdy, and am strongly impressed with the importance of thhr, on the extreme right, guarding the bridge on the Purdy road over Owl Creek. Second Brigade, composed of ttery — still at Shiloh — to fall back as far as the Purdy and Hamburg road, and for McDowell and Buckland to a
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 12 (search)
treme right of the right wing, and marched out by the White house, leaving Monterey or Pea Ridge to the south. Crossing Lick Creek, we came into the main road about a mile south of Monterey, where we turned square to the right, and came into the Purdy road, near Elams. Thence we followed the Purdy road to Corinth, my skirmishers reaching at all times the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. Of course our marches were governed by the main centre, which followed the direct road from Pittsburg Landing to CoPurdy road to Corinth, my skirmishers reaching at all times the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. Of course our marches were governed by the main centre, which followed the direct road from Pittsburg Landing to Corinth; and this movement was provokingly slow. We fortified almost every camp at night, though we had encountered no serious opposition, except from cavalry, which gave ground easily as we advanced. The opposition increased as we neared Corinth, and at a place called Russell's we had a sharp affair of one brigade, under the immediate direction of Brigadier-General Morgan L. Smith, assisted by the brigade of General Denver. This affair occurred on the 19th of May, and our line was then within