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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
m Paducah, our (Sherman's) division going into camp at Shiloh Church on the 18th and 19th of March. Savannah, ten miles below, was selected as the headquarters of the commanding general. The division of General Lew Wallace was landed at Crump's, four miles above Savannah, and the other five divisions of McClernand, Smith, Hurlbut, Sherman, and Prentiss, disembarked at Pittsburg Landing, which consisted of a warehouse, grocery, and one dwelling. It was a point whence roads led to Corinth, Purdy, and the settlements adjacent. It appeared to have been regarded as of some importance, in a military view, by the Confederates, for after the fall of Donelson they erected a battery on the high bluff overlooking the landing, and General Cheatham occupied Shiloh as a military camp. The country is undulating table-land, the bluffs rising to the height of one hundred and fifty feet above the alluvial. Three principal streams and numerous tributaries cut the ground occupied by the army, w
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The Army at Pittsburg landing-injured by a fall --the Confederate attack at Shiloh-the first day's fight at Shiloh-General Sherman-condition of the Army-close of the first day's fight --the second day's fight-retreat and defeat of the Confederates (search)
nts, I sent two more of my staff, Colonel McPherson and Captain [William R.] Rowley, to bring him up with his division. They reported finding him marching towards Purdy, Bethel, or some point west from the river, and farther from Pittsburg by several miles than when he started. The road from his first position to Pittsburg landinvered to him by Captain Baxter was simply to join the right of the army, and that the road over which he marched would have taken him to the road from Pittsburg to Purdy where it crosses Owl Creek on the right of Sherman; but this is not where I had ordered him nor where I wanted him to go. I never could see and do not now see ements between Shiloh and his position, extending from Crump's landing westward, and he sends it over the road running from Adamsville to the Pittsburg landing and Purdy road. These two roads intersect nearly a mile west of the crossing of the latter over Owl Creek, where our right rested. In this letter General Lew. Wallace advi
tired. The steamer Yankee visited the Navy-Yard at Washington, took on board a quantity of shell, and to-day, with the Anacostia, she proceeded to shell the rebel batteries at Aquia Creek. The enemy replied briskly with their guns, but failed to reach the Yankee, although they made several excellent line-shots. One shell struck but a short distance from the Yankee, in direct range with her wheel-house. Most of the shots were too high for the Anacostia, many of them passing over to a great distance. The heavy guns of the Yankee enabled her to lie off out of range, and drop her shells with precision into the batteries. After firing some time the Yankee and Anacostia hauled off, without being struck. Gen. Lew. Wallace's division went to Purdy, McNair County, Tenn., burned the bridge, and took up the track, on the railroad leading from Humboldt to Corinth, Miss., cutting off a train heavily laden with troops, which arrived while the bridge was burning.--N. Y. World, March 17.
. 152.) Mansfield Lovell, General late in command of the rebel forces at New Orleans, La., telegraphed to Richmond as follows from Camp Moore, La.:--Forts Jackson and St. Philip are still in good condition, and in our hands. The steamers Louisiana and McRae are safe. The enemy's fleet are at the city, (New Orleans), but they have not forces enough to occupy it. The inhabitants are stanchly loyal. Fort Livingston, La., was this day evacuated by the rebel forces.--National Intelligencer, May 10. Gen. Beauregard, at Memphis, Tennessee, issued the following address to the planters of the South :--The casualties of war have opened the Mississippi to our enemies. The time has therefore come to test the earnestness of all classes, and I call upon all patriotic planters owning cotton in the possible reach of our enemies to apply the torch to it without delay or hesitation. --Missouri Democrat. Purdy, Tennessee, was evacuated by the confederates.--Memphis Argus, April 29.
r Maria was captured near Charleston, S. C., by the U. S. steamer Santiago de Cuba.--N. Y. Tribune, May 6. A reconnoissance in force was made this morning from the right wing of the National army, near Pittsburgh, Tenn., four miles north of Purdy, on the Memphis and Ohio Railroad. The National troops met a force of rebel cavalry, who fled, and were pursued to Purdy. On taking possession of the town, the Union troops burned two bridges and threw a locomotive into the river. Three prisonPurdy. On taking possession of the town, the Union troops burned two bridges and threw a locomotive into the river. Three prisoners were taken, and the Unionists retired, having cut off all railroad communication between Corinth and the North.--Baltimore American, May 2. A. G. Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania, has issued a general order in acknowledgment of the gallantry of the Seventy-seventh regiment of infantry, Pennsylvania volunteers, Col. F. S. Stambaugh commanding, at Shiloh, Tennessee, and of the First regiment of cavalry, Pennsylvania volunteers, Col. George D. Bayard commanding, at Falmouth, Virginia. He
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
right north-easterly across the flat to Battery Powell, a similar redan on the ridge east of the Purdy road. Hamilton was to be on Davies's right with a brigade, and the rest in reserve on the commorate forces emerging from the woods west of the railroad and crossing the open ground toward the Purdy road. Our troops lying on the ground could see the flags of the enemy and the glint of the sunlg Third Division. General: The general commanding directs that you cover with your division the Purdy road, from the swamp on the railroad to where the road runs through the rebel works. By commandsufficiently well in so as to have full sweep, holding a couple of regiments looking well to the Purdy road. Examine and reconnoiter the ground for making this movement. By order of Major-General Ren 8 and 9 P. M. a staff-officer brought me the following order: Place your batteries on the Purdy road at 10 P. I. and play them two hours in a north-west direction with shot and shell, where th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
ditch five feet deep. Davies was to extend from Brigadier-General Pleasant A. Hackleman, killed at Corinth. From a steel Engraving. Stanley's right north-easterly across the flat to Battery Powell, a similar redan on the ridge east of the Purdy road. Hamilton was to be on Davies's right with a brigade, and the rest in reserve on the common east of the low ridge and out of sight from the west. Colonel J. K. Mizner with his cavalry was to watch and guard our flanks and rear from the ene cover save a slight ridge, on the south-west slope of which, near the crest, the men were lying down. Riding along this line, I observed the Confederate forces emerging from the woods west of the railroad and crossing the open ground toward the Purdy road. Our troops lying on the ground could see the flags of the enemy and the glint of the sunlight on their bayonets. It was about 9 o'clock in the morning. The air was still and fiercely hot. Van Dorn says that the Confederate preparations f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hamilton's division at Corinth. (search)
: Corinth, Oct. 3d, 1862. Brigadier-General Hamilton, Commanding Third Division. General: The general commanding directs that you cover with your division the Purdy road, from the swamp on the railroad to where the road runs through the rebel works. By command of Major-General Rosecrans.--Goddard, A. A. A. General. P. S. Yis not attacked, falling to the left of Davies when the enemy gets sufficiently well in so as to have full sweep, holding a couple of regiments looking well to the Purdy road. Examine and reconnoiter the ground for making this movement. By order of Major-General Rosecrans.--I. G. Kennett, Colonel and Chief of Staff. On the ba, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief of Grand Guards and Outposts. Between 8 and 9 P. M. a staff-officer brought me the following order: Place your batteries on the Purdy road at 10 P. I. and play them two hours in a north-west direction with shot and shell, where the enemy is massed, and at midnight attack them with your whole divi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
g on the west side of the river, four miles above Savannah, and thence sixteen miles westward to Purdy, a village on the railway between Humbolt, in Tennessee, and Corinth, to destroy portions of then that vicinity, and especially one with extended trestle-work at each end, a few miles south of Purdy. This was a hazardous undertaking, for General Cheatham, with a large force of the Confederatesn was detached and stationed at Crump's Landing, to observe any movements of the Confederates at Purdy, and to cover the river communications between Pittsburg Landing and Savannah. The latter was mWallace's division was composed of three brigades, stationed on the road from Crump's Landing to Purdy, the first at the Landing, the second two miles out, and the third two miles and a half farther,o the pushing back of an Ohio brigade, that had been sent out to reconnoiter in the direction of Purdy, his division marched as far as Adamsville in a drenching rain, on Friday night (April 4), and t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
undred prisoners. The National loss was two killed and eleven wounded. The cavalry and artillery pushed on to Glendale, a little east of Corinth, and destroyed the railway track and two important trestle-bridges there. In the mean time, General Wallace had sent out April 30. Colonel Morgan L. Smith, with three battalions of cavalry and a brigade of infantry, upon the Mobile and Ohio railway, who fought the Confederates in a wood, and destroyed an important bridge and the track not far from Purdy, by which supplies and re-enforcements for Beauregard, at Jackson, Tennessee, were cut off. This was a timely movement, for, while the bridge was burning, an engine that had been sent up from Corinth to help through three trains heavily laden with troops from Memphis, and hurrying forward by the longer way of Humbolt and Jackson, because the direct road was of insufficient capacity at that time, came thundering on. The Nationals, who lay in ambush, captured it, and ran it off at full spee
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