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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
(Cos. A and B ). Monterey April 28-29. Purdy April 29. Advance on and siege of Corinth Ad siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Purdy April 29. Pursuit to Booneville May 30-JuneRaid on Mobile and Ohio R. R. and skirmish at Purdy May 4. March to Bethel and Jackson, Tenn., Ohio R. R. April 29-May 14, and skirmish at Purdy, Tenn., May 4. March to Purdy and Jackson, TennPurdy and Jackson, Tenn., June 4-7, and duty there till July. Assigned to Stewart's Battalion, Illinois Cavalry, as Comd on Mobile and Ohio R. R. and skirmish at Purdy, Tenn., May 7. Moved to Bethel and Jackson, Tend on Mobile and Ohio R. R. and skirmish at Purdy, Tenn., May 4. Moved to Bethel and Jackson, Tenf Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. March to Purdy and Jackson, Tenn., June 5-8, and duty in Distf Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. March to Purdy, Bethel and Jackson June 5-8. Duty at Jacksf Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. March to Purdy, thence to Jackson, Tenn., June 5-8, and duty
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
apture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. Expedition to Clarksville, Tenn., February 19-21. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn., March 9-14. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege oaducah on Columbus, Ky., November 7-9, 1861. Moved to Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-15, 1862. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn., March 9-14. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. March to Purdy, thence to Bolivar, Tenn., and duty there till September. March to Iuka, Miss., September 1-20. Duty in District of Jackson till November. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November 2,Henry, Tenn., February 15-17. Duty at Fort Henry till March. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing March 9-14. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corint
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
Cos. sent to Prestonburg, Ky., December 10 and. join Garfield. Garfield's operations against Humphrey Marshall December 23, 1861, to January 20, 1862. Middle Creek, near Prestonburg, January 10, 1862.) Near Logan's Cross Roads, Mill Springs, on Fishing Creek, January 19-20, 1862. Near Cumberland Gap February 14 (Detachment). Big Creek Gap and Jacksboro March 14 (Detachment). Reconnoissance to Cumberland Gap March 21-23 (1st Battalion). Moved to Nashville, Tenn., April. Purdy and Lebanon May 5. Duty at Shelbyville, Columbia, Mount Pleasant, Lawrenceburg, Pulaski and Murfreesboro, Tenn., till August. March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 21-September 26. Capture of 3rd Georgia Cavalry at New Haven September 29. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-22. Near Perryville October 6-7. Battle of Perryville October 8. Danville October 11. Near Mountain Gap October 14 and 16. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 22-November 7.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
, 1862. Service. Dug Springs, Mo., August 2, 1861. At Sulphur Springs, Mo., August. Ordered to Cape Girardeau, Mo., August 25. Duty there and in Missouri to February, 1862. Ordered to join Army of the Tennessee. Expedition to Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. Paris March 11. Battle of Shiloh April 6-7. Paris April 10. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Expedition to Ripley June 27-July 1. At Camp Clear Crle, Ky., November 30, 1861 (3 Cos.). Moved to Fort Henry, Tenn., February 5, 1862. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. Expedition to Clarksville February 19-21. Moved to Savannah, Tenn. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing March 9-14. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Lick Creek April 24. Corinth Road April 25. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Russell House, near Corinth, May 17. March
of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 14-16, 1862. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn., March 9-14. Battle Dept. of the Gulf, to April, 1866. Service. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing March 9-14, 1862. Battle ofof Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 14-16, 1862. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn., March 9-14. Battle of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16, 1862. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing March 9-14. Battle of Shilodvance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. March to Purdy, thence to Bolivar, and duty there till September. March to Iukaof Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 13-16, 1862. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn., March 9-14. Battle re of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 16, 1862. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn., March 9-14. Battle
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 3: Whittier the politician (search)
r. C., he can then request his friends to give their votes for some other individual for the sake of promoting peace in the district. The Kittredge committee would in that case probably nominate a candidate,--if one could be found,--but, I understand Mr. Thayer, not with the expectation of his being elected. If I were nominated after the November trial, Mr. Thayer, situated as he and I relatively are, would support the nomination, and let the other candidate go, as he did John Merrill. Purdy, the Telegraph, and the Essex Register would do the same. The truth of the matter is, the thing would be peculiarly beneficial to me,--if not at home, it would be so abroad. It would give me an opportunity of seeing and knowing our public characters, and in case of Mr. Clay's election, might enable me to do something for myself or my friends. It would be worth more to me now, young as I am, than almost any office after I had reached the meridian of life. In this matter, if I know m
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix B. (search)
liar to you. Were you to assume command it would afford me the most unfeigned pleasure, and every energy would be exerted to help you to victory and the country to independence. Were you to decline, still your presence alone would be of inestimable advantage. The enemy are now at Nashville, about 50,000 strong, advancing in this direction by Columbia. He has also forces, according to the report of General Bragg, landing at Pittsburg, from 25,000 to 50,000, and moving in the direction of Purdy. This army corps moving to join Bragg is about 20,000 strong. Two brigades, Hindman's and Wood's, are, I suppose, at Corinth. One regiment of Hardee's division, Lieutenant-Colonel Patton commanding, is moving by cars today (20th March), and Statham's brigade, Crittenden's division. The brigade will halt at Iuka, the regiment at Burnsville. Cleburne's brigade, Hardee's division, except regiment at Burnsville, and Carroll's brigade, Crittenden's division, and Helm's cavalry at Tuscumbia
ng to enter the last work, where his conspicuous gallantry had carried him and his little band. Captains Gibson, Tenth Texas; Bates, Ninth; Adjutant Griffin, Ninth; and Lieut. Dixon E. Wetzel, Ninth, were killed, gallantly leading their men. Brig.-Gen. W. H. Young, commanding brigade, was wounded. Most gallantly he bore his part in the action. Colonel Camp, commanding Fourteenth Texas, one of the best officers in the service, was seriously wounded; also Majors McReynolds, Ninth Texas, and Purdy, Fourteenth Texas. Of captains wounded were Wright, Lyles, Russell, Vannoy and Ridley, and Lieutenants Tunnell, Haynes, Gibbons, Agee, Morris, O'Brien, Irwin, Reeves and Robertson. . . . To Colonel Earp, on whom the command of the gallant Texans devolved, and to Colonel Andrews (Thirty-second Texas), who commanded on the south side, . . . I return my thanks for services. . . . Lieut. M. W. Armstrong, Tenth Texas, seized the United States standard from the Federals, and after a struggle bro
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
View 125, 2 Pryor's Creek, Indian Territory 119, 1; 160, E7 Pulaski, Tenn. 24, 3; 61, 9; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, C5; 171 Fort Pulaski, Ga. 5, 3, 5, 4; 70, 2; 76, 2; 91, 4; 117, 1; 120, 2; 133, 3; 135-A; 144, G11; 171 Bombardment and capture, April 10-11, 1862 5, 3, 4 Pumpkin Vine Creek, Ga. 48, 3; 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 2; 59, 3; 61, 14; 62, 1; 88, 2; 90, 6; 101, 13; 149, G12 Purcellville, Va. 7, 1; 27, 1; 81, 4; 84, 19; 100, 1; 116, 2; 136, F6 Purdy, Tenn. 24, 3; 78, 3; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, C1; 154, A14 Putnam, Redoubt, Tenn.: Plan 111, 13 Quaker Road, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 19, 1; 66, 9; 74, 2; 76, 5; 77, 2; 93, 1; 94, 8 Quallatown, N. C. 24, 3; 142, F5 Quarles' Mill, Va. 45, 1; 55, 4; 74, 1; 96, 2; 100, 1 Quincy, Ill. 135-A; 171 Quincy, Mo. 152, G1; 161, G13 Quitman, Ark. 117, 1; 135-A; 153, H3 Fort Quitman, Tex. 98, 1; 171 Raccoon Ford, Va. 16, 1; 22, 5; 23, 4; 44, 3; 45, 1
the command, and he was therefore left to guard the Purdy road. McClernand was detained a day or two, by lacnts of rebel infantry, and twelve hundred cavalry at Purdy, and an equal if not larger force at Bethel, four miwould indicate that the enemy are sending a force to Purdy, and, it may be, with a view to attack General Wallat was refused, resting on Owl creek and covering the Purdy road. This posi tion became the key-point of the fio Crump's Landing, and those in front to Corinth and Purdy. To the right and rear of Sherman, the Crump's Land's Landing, but his troops were stretched out on the Purdy road, so as to be ready to move either to Pittsburg or Purdy, as circumstances might require. There were no intrenchments, for the Western troops had not yet lear a probable movement upon him, from the direction of Purdy, his situation being isolated, and somewhat exposed.g that he had taken the wrong road, marching towards Purdy instead of to Pittsburg; yet, his troops had helped
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