hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 736 results in 94 document sections:

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
by being drawn or decoyed too far away from our original line of advance.. I felt compelled, therefore, to do what is usually a mistake in war—divide my forces—send a part back into Tennessee, retaining the balance here. . . I admit that the first object should be the destruction of that army, and if Beauregard moves his infantry and artillery up into the pocket about Jackson and Paris, I shall feel strongly tempted to move Thomas directly against him, and myself move rapidly by Decatur and Purdy to cut off his retreat. But this would involve the abandonment of Atlanta and a retrograde movement, which would be of very doubtful expediency or success. . . I am more than satisfied that Beauregard has not the nerve to attack fortifications, or to meet me in open battle, and it would be a great achievement for him to make me abandon Atlanta, by mere threats or manoeuvres. But by far the most important part of this despatch related to his line of march, for his absolute route was yet ne
Col. Preston Smith, March 31st, in skirmish near Adamsville. (382) Mentioned in General Hardee's division, April 1st, at Purdy. (385) Mentioned April 2d, scouting near Purdy. (415) Placed in position at Bethel, April 12th. (419) Mentioned in speciPurdy. (415) Placed in position at Bethel, April 12th. (419) Mentioned in special orders, No. 12, April 14th. (435) General Maxey says: Colonel Brewer's cavalry is destroying bridges at Purdy, April 23d. (456) Mentioned by General Maxey, Bethel, April 27th. (458) Ordered to protect the Mobile & Ohio railroad, by command of Purdy, April 23d. (456) Mentioned by General Maxey, Bethel, April 27th. (458) Ordered to protect the Mobile & Ohio railroad, by command of General Beauregard, April 28th. (459) Three hundred and forty-two present for duty, April 28th, General Beall's cavalry brigade. (493) Mentioned by Colonel Lindsay, Camp Foote, near Purdy, May 5th. (516) Mentioned by Adjutant-General Jordan, CoriPurdy, May 5th. (516) Mentioned by Adjutant-General Jordan, Corinth, May 12th. (519) Guarding the crossing, Memphis & Charleston railroad, May 13th. (582) Captain Falkner's company placed at intersection of roads from Iuka to Jacinto, June 4, 1862. Vol. XVII, Part 2—(63) Attacked Colo
es, are connected by a good ridge road. Another road from Corinth follows a line south of the other, runs through Monterey and into the ridge road between Owl and Lick creeks, where the Federal line was posted. From Monterey a road ran north to Purdy, intersecting the ridge road, and another ran northward toward Savannah, also intersecting the ridge road at Mickey's house. Beyond Mickey's, toward Pittsburg, the ridge road merges in the bark road. On April 3d the order of march and battle wale at Monterey, advance up the two intersecting roads and then follow Hardee, forming a second line of battle. The First corps, except the division detached at Bethel, would follow the Third corps. The Reserve corps and the forces at Bethel and Purdy would concentrate on Monterey and go into action as practicable. On the 4th Hardee marched to Mickey's, and it was the skirmish on his front which led Grant to say that he had scarcely the faintest idea of a general attack. That night it rain
battle on the morning of the 18th, and the enemy formed a line in opposition, but nothing followed but some skirmishing. An advance was again ordered on the 20th, Van Dorn to move to Farmington and drive the enemy hotly on roads to Monterey and Purdy; Hardee to attack Pope if he attempted to effect a junction with Buell; Polk and Breckinridge to form north of town and take the enemy in flank and rear. Rain compelled a day's postponement. On the 21st there was a brisk fight at the Widow Se, resulting from the advance of the Confederates in that direction, which if pushed would have thrown us between Thomas' command, lately Grant's, and the corps of Buell and Pope. At the same time Polk and Breckinridge took position fronting the Purdy road. But Van Dorn, having been sent on a circuitous route toward Farmington, was not heard from until the next morning, when he reported that he had been delayed by bad management, the stupidity of officers and the difficulty of the country, an
been known up to this date as Miller's battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. H. Miller commanding. On the 3d day of April General Johnston issued an address to the troops, in which he announced, I have put you in motion to offer battle to the invaders of your country. Hon. Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi, aide to General Beauregard, in his report of April 9th states that this advance was made in consequence of the information brought, from General Cheatham, who occupied Bethel Station and the town of Purdy with his division. In the attack about to be made on General Grant, General Johnston expected to beat him back to his transports and there capture him and his forces, then cross the Tennessee river and give battle to Buell, known to be advancing to Grant's assistance. General Johnston rapidly concentrated his troops and delivered battle in the early morning of the 6th of April. That peerless soldier was in immediate and active command of the troops, General Beauregard being at his quart
nd in the Egyptian army, but declined. In 1886 he was appointed chief of railroad division in a government department at Washington, D. C. Brigadier-General Marcus Joseph Wright Brigadier-General Marcus Joseph Wright was born at Purdy, McNairy county, Tenn., June 5, 1831. His grandfather, John Wright, was a native of Savannah, Ga., and was a captain of the Georgia line in the revolutionary war. His father, Benjamin, was also a native of Savannah, and was an officer of the Thirty-ninth incolonel of the Thirteenth Tennessee infantry, was in the battle of Belmont, Mo., in which he commanded his regiment, and was afterward elected a member of the Confederate Congress, serving two terms. General Wright was educated in the academy at Purdy, receiving a classical education. He studied law and removed to Memphis, where he became clerk of the common law and chancery court of that city. He was lieutenant-colonel of the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth regiment of Tennessee militia, which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
ys rations, and are expecting marching orders every moment. The enemy are reported advancing on Purdy, and it is supposed that we will be ordered to meet the advancing foe. General Bragg is in comma worthless novel. This evening Colonel Smith secured comfortable quarters for us in the town of Purdy. We marched in about 3 o'clock, and after dress parade, repaired to our quarters in the old Col March 20th.—This morning we were ordered to leave our baggage in an old shop, and march back to Purdy with the Second Tennessee regiment, and two guns of Polk's battery. Sunday—March 23d.—Have spent the past few days in the old College building at Purdy, lolling about lazily and indifferent to surrounding circumstances. The weather has been cold, dark and dreary, and my spirits are in sympariting in the observatory of the college, and have a most enchanting view of the little town of Purdy, and the surrounding country. The sun has just gone down, and this is the hour when I love to b<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
d driven in great confusion. In the mentime three brigades of Sherman's Division, on the left, aroused by the din and uproar, had time to form, but were attacked by Ruggle's Division of Bragg's Corps. Sherman, as has been stated, occupied a formidable position, but he could not stand the impetuous movement of the Confederates, and fell back, leaving six guns on the field. Very soon McClernand came up, but both he and Sherman were swept from the field until they reached a road leading from Purdy to Hamburg. Along this road they formed, and posted every battery they could find in a thick wood with a ravine in front. On dashed Ruggles and a part of Polk's Corps, with a fury and vim which could not be withstood, and the Yankees broke again, leaving twelve pieces of artillery on the field. Hurlbut, who was camped in the rear, apprised of the trouble by the incessant roar of musketry and artillery, sent a brigade to support Sherman, and went with his two other brigades to help Pren
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.54 (search)
r roads also approach from all directions, one crossing Owl Creek by a bridge, before its junction with Snake Creek, branches, the one way trending westward toward Purdy, the other northward toward Crump's landing, six miles below Pittsburg. Another road nearer the river bank, crossing Snake Creek by a bridge, also connects the twanies of cavalry, stood directly across the upper Pittsburg road, facing southward. One of the three brigades rested its right at the crossing of Owl Creek on the Purdy road, and the other two lay, the one with its right and the other with its left near a rustic log meeting house, called Shiloh. There, also, were established th, with the loss of five or six guns, was forced back just as McClernand came up. They were both then swept rearward, near the line of the crossroad from Hamburg to Purdy. There Sherman, with McClernand, gained a foothold, and, with several batteries favorably posted, made another stand on a thicklywooded ridge with a ravine in fro
by being drawn or decoyed too far away from our original line of advance.. I felt compelled, therefore, to do what is usually a mistake in war—divide my forces—send a part back into Tennessee, retaining the balance here. . . I admit that the first object should be the destruction of that army, and if Beauregard moves his infantry and artillery up into the pocket about Jackson and Paris, I shall feel strongly tempted to move Thomas directly against him, and myself move rapidly by Decatur and Purdy to cut off his retreat. But this would involve the abandonment of Atlanta and a retrograde movement, which would be of very doubtful expediency or success. . . I am more than satisfied that Beauregard has not the nerve to attack fortifications, or to meet me in open battle, and it would be a great achievement for him to make me abandon Atlanta, by mere threats or manoeuvres. But by far the most important part of this despatch related to his line of march, for his absolute route was yet ne
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10