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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 5 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Rally Hill (Tennessee, United States) or search for Rally Hill (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
line of battle. From a photograph: the right of Wagner's two brigades, in the advanced position, was posted behind the stone wall in the foreground. The Columbia Pike is shown passing over the hills on the left of the picture. from that direction. Most of the artillery was placed on a rise south of the town. The trains were parked within the semicircle. From Spring Hill roads radiate to all points, the turnpike between Columbia and Franklin being there intersected by turnpikes from Rally Hill and Mount Carmel, as well as by numerous country roads leading to the neighboring towns. Possession of that point would not only shut out the Union army from the road to Nashville, but it would effectually bar the way in every direction. Stanley's arrival was not a moment too soon for the safety of the army, and his prompt dispositions and steady courage, as well as his vigorous hold of all the ground he occupied, gave his little command all the moral fruits of a victory. Hardly had t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
ike. Shortly afterward the pickets were driven in, and at 2:10 P. M., on the same day, I notified General Schofield of the enemy's determined advance and that I should therefore concentrate the cavalry that night on the Lewisburg turnpike near Rally Hill, so as to prevent the enemy from occupying that highway and marching rapidly to Franklin, at the crossing of the Harpeth River, and also at the junction of the Lewisburg and the Columbia turnpikes. I assumed, as a matter of course, that Schofi slowly and with caution, by either of these roads, or still move slowly by the dirt road, from Huey's Mills to Spring Hill. By 7 P. M. the entire cavalry, after much skirmishing and rapid marching, was concentrated at Hurt's Cross-roads, near Rally Hill, and by midnight it had become certain that Forrest's entire command, followed by the infantry of Hood's army, were crossing at Huey's Mills, and would probably move at early dawn toward Spring Hill. Accordingly, at 1 A. M. of that night, I se