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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for Randolphs (Tennessee, United States) or search for Randolphs (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

d at all times found him ready and anxious to co-operate with me in any plan that might seem to give reasonable promise of success; but he was unwilling to attempt running by Fort Pillow with part of his gunboats and place them between it and Fort Randolph unless we had shore batteries on the Arkansas side of the river, under which the boats could take refuge in the event of their being crippled either by the guns of the fort or the rebel gunboats. There was no possible means of establishing a distributed in the district as they were before the expedition sailed. In conclusion, permit me to express the opinion that with a properlyorganized force of 5,000 men I doubt not the easy, and perhaps bloodless, capture of Forts Pillow and Randolph so soon as the roads leading from the river, by which the rear of their works can be gained, become practicable for artillery; but in the present condition of the country about here it would be unwise to withdraw from the different posts within
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 3-5, 1862.-evacuation of Fort Pillow, Tenn., by the Confederates and its occupation by the Union forces. (search)
y overrated, their fleet of rams and gunboats is much larger than mine. It consists of eight gunboats, which usually lie just below the fort, and four others at Randolph, a few miles farther down. Commodore Davis will not join me in a movement against them nor contribute a gunboat to my expedition, nor allow any of his men to votherefore first weed out some bad material, and then go without him. Respectfully, Chas. Ellet, Jr., Colonel, Commanding. Hon. E. M. Stanton. opposite Randolph, 12 miles below Fort Pillow, June 5 (via Cairo, June 8), 1862. Sir: To my mortification the enemy evacuated Fort Pillow last night. They carried away or destand a part of his command. The gunboats then came down and anchored across the channel. I proceeded with three rams 12 miles below the fort to a point opposite Randolph, and sent Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet ashore, with a flag of truce, to demand the surrender of the place. Their forces had all lefttwo of their gunboats only an ho
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 6, 1862.-naval engagement off Memphis, Tenn., and occupation of that city by Union forces. (search)
pi River in front of Memphlis. l regret that I have to state I think the misfortune was occasioned by a misapprehension of orders or misinformation as to the surrounding circumstances. The evacuation of Fort Pillow was, from all accounts, well and orderly conducted, after once determined upon, but by some means my men were sent to Memphis on a transport instead of being placed on the gun. boats. The circumstances which may have caused the evacuation of Fort Pillow did not surround Fort Randolph, and I am satisfied that, even with the few troops that were at Pillow, Randolph could have been held for several days, with a sure and safe retreat when necessary, if ever. Our fleet, for want of coal, as represented, fell back to Memphis on the 5th with the intention of returning to Island No.40. The arrangements for this purpose were being made, but before 10 o'clock p. m. on the 5th the tugs which were on picket above the city reported the enemy's tugs in sight. This was discre