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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 2 2 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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as increased by this concentration of effort. A series of providential visitations, not necessary to be recounted here, had crippled Bishop Polk's large estate; but his pecuniary losses neither shook his earnest faith nor abated his hope and zeal in all good works. The chief business of Bishop Polk's life for five or six years before the war, though not to the detriment of his duties as bishop, was in developing the plan and procuring the endowment of the University of the South, at Sewanee, on the Cumberland Mountains, in Tennessee. He secured 5,000 acres of land, and subscriptions for $400,000, and gave the start to an institution which is now doing a very useful work, and has before it a career of most excellent promise, but which he designed making second to none in this country — a place where Southern youth could obtain all those advantages of the higher university education which they were then seeking at the North or abroad. The building up of this institution had no
d soldier, who published during the war, at Columbia, South Carolina, an edition of Marmont's Spirit of military institutions, with valuable annotations pertinent to the times, illustrates Chapter III. of Part IV. of that work, which describes the picture of a general who answers to all the requirements of the command, by a review of the life and character of General Johnston. Colonel Schaller has for several years been Professor of Modern Languages at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. He begins his brief but appreciative memoir as follows : Two foreign officers in the service of the Confederate States were ordered to report for duty to General Albert Sidney Johnston in the month of October, 1861. When leaving his headquarters at Bowling Green, in the State of Kentucky, having then seen and spoken with him for the first time, they simultaneously exclaimed, when outside of the inclosure of the unpretending quarters: He is the very beau-ideal of a general. To
position of the line subsequently occupied by Polk and myself would be so enfiladed. This is in substance what I stated in my official report; and this statement was written by General Shoupe himself, at present the Reverend Dr. Shoupe, of Sewanee, Tennessee. The subjoined letter is confirmatory of my assertion: Sewanee, Tennessee, June 3d, 1874. Dear General:--With regard to the point you mention, I have a very distinct recollection. I pointed out the fact to General Johnston that hSewanee, Tennessee, June 3d, 1874. Dear General:--With regard to the point you mention, I have a very distinct recollection. I pointed out the fact to General Johnston that his line would be enfiladed before the troops were posted, and suggested a change of position to obviate the trouble. The General replied that the troops could not hope to be always sheltered from fire, and that they must make the best of it by traversing. As soon as the enemy got into position, my fears were fully verified. The line, at that point, fell back from the crest of the ridge, but was poorly sheltered even upon the slope. I should say that there was as much as a quarter of a mi
ississippi. Daniel H. Reynolds fought with Hood at Nashville. Daniel C. Govan commanded a noted brigade. Evander McNair, important leader in the Army of Tennessee. Thomas P. Dockery led a Cavalry brigade. Frank C. Armstrong, brilliant Cavalry commander. River campaign. After the war, he devoted himself largely to education, becoming chancellor of the University of Nashville from 1870 to 1875, and later professor of mathematics at the University of the South. He died in Sewanee, Tennessee, March 28, 1893. Army of the Mississippi From troops in the Western Department (Department No. 2) was created the Army of the Mississippi on March 5, 1862, and to General P. G. T. Beauregard was given the command. The army was divided into two corps headed by Major-Generals Leonidas Polk and Braxton Bragg. On March 29th, the army was joined to the Central Army of Kentucky with its three divisions, reserve corps, and cavalry. General A. S. Johnston, of the latter, took command
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
...March 20, 1893 Bering Sea arbitration opened in Paris......March 23, 1893 President informed that Great Britain and France have raised their representatives to the United States to the rank of ambassadors......March 24, 1893 A threatening outbreak on the Choctaw reservation, Indian Territory, between rival Indian factions, results in a battle; several are wounded......March28, 1893 Edmund Kirby Smith, Confederate general, born at St. Augustine, Fla., May 16, 1824, dies in Sewanee, Tenn.......March 28, 1893 Gen. Hiram Berdan, inventor of a longrange rifle, dies at Washington, D. C.......March 31, 1893 Thomas F. Bayard, of Delaware, nominated ambassador to the Court of St. James (the first ambassador of the United States), March 30; he takes the oath of office......April 3, 1893 Arguments of English and American representatives begun before the court of arbitration in the Bering Sea dispute......April 4, 1893 Minister Hicks telegraphing that the consular agenc
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
nt to Wartrace. June 25. We saw the Federals advancing in three columns. Saw the Stars and Stripes floating in the distance. Skirmishing between the pickets. Our army is retiring slowly, in good order. From June 27 to 30 we marched via Wartrace, Tullahoma, Allisonia to Winchester. July 2. We left Winchester to-day. Here our first troops from Tennessee entered camps two years and two months ago. Now we evacuate Middle Tennessee. July 3. Our army is climbing the mountain at Sewanee, and pass University Place, where the Episcopalians are founding a school. July 4. We have crossed the Cumberland Mountains, and are in the Sequatchie Valley, and pass through Jasper. Sunday, July 5. Rest all day in the quiet retreat of the valley on the banks of the Sequatchie River. July 6. Crossed the Tennessee River at Kelley's Ford on a pontoon bridge, the first I ever saw. We encamped at Lookout Station–and the campaign in Middle Tennessee is over. Chattanooga, Chickama
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
els as superintendent of the Briar-field iron works. Soon afterward he was appointed headmaster and later vice-chancellor of the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee. In 1877 he became president of the University of Alabama, but after a brief tenure was compelled by failing health to resign. The trustees desiring his clegraph company, was chancellor of the university of Nashville, 1870-1875, and subsequently was professor of mathematics in the university of the South, at Sewanee, Tennessee, until his death, March 28, 1893. Lieutenant-General John Bell Hood Lieutenant-General John Bell Hood, general with temporary rank, 1864, was born in ch he retained throughout life. He was an earnest participant in the secession movement, and when war became imminent, removed his family from New Orleans to Sewanee, Tenn., where he had projected the University of the South in 1856. He then offered his military services to the Confederacy, and was commissioned major-general Jun
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
ng the latter three years he was also the owner and editor of the Camden Journal, one of the oldest weekly journals of the State. Having at this time determined to devote his life to another calling, he entered the university of the South at Sewanee, Tenn., as a candidate for holy orders. He was graduated in August, 1875, and on the 15th of the same month was ordained deacon at St. Philip's church, Charleston, by Bishop W. B. W. Howe. On December 19, 1876, he was ordained priest. He was in cy of seven children, of whom but two are now living, Mary, wife of M. A. Morgan, of Greenville, and John O. Westfield. The latter was born July 29, 1869, at Greenville, was educated at the Furman university and the university of the South at Sewanee, Tenn., and in 1889 was graduated in law at the South Carolina college. Being admitted to the bar in 1890 he went to the Pacific coast for the improvement of his health and practiced his profession one year at Los Angeles. Then returning to Greenv
d to the Confederate congress. The year after the close of the war he was elected to the chair of applied mathematics in the university of Mississippi. Here he studied for the ministry and was admitted to orders in the Episcopal church, of which he had become a member while the Confederate army was in camp at Dalton, April, 1864. He officiated as rector at Waterford, N. Y., Nashville, Tenn., and New Orleans, La.; also filled the chair of metaphysics in the university of the South, at Sewanee, Tenn. He is the author of a work on Infantry Tactics; while in Atlanta, in 1864, prepared a text-book on Artillery Division Drill, and in 1874 he published the Elements of Algebra. Major-General Martin L. Smith was another of the many gentlemen of Northern birth who, residing in the South, adopted the sentiments of the people among whom they lived, and with zeal and loyalty supported the Confederate cause. State sovereignty was the political doctrine of the majority of the founders of the
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
1; 136, F6; 137, D5 Union Church, Miss. 155, F8 Fort Union, N. Mex. 98, 1; 119, 1; 171 Union Mills, Mo. 161, B10 Union Mills, Va. 7, 1; 16, 1; 23, 2; 100, 1; 111, 1; 137, D5, 137, G5 Union Springs, Ala. 135-A; 148, F9; 171 Uniontown, Ky. 117, 1; 118, 1; 150, B2; 151, G3 Unionville, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 34, 3; 118, 1; 149, A7 United States Ford, Va. 22, 5; 39, 3; 45, 1; 74, 1; 81, 1; 86, 13, 86, 14; 91, 1; 93, 2; 100, 1; 135, 6 University, Tenn. 117, 1; 149, C9 Upperville, Va. 27, 1; 100, 1; 137, A6 Urbana, Md. 25, 6; 27, 1; 81, 4; 100, 1; 116, 2; 136, E7 Utah, Department of (U): Boundaries 162; 163 Utah Territory 120, 1; 162-171 Utah Creek, N. Mex. 54, 1; 119, 1 Utica, Miss. 36, 1; 51, 1; 135-A; 155, D8 Utoy Creek, Ga. 58, 2; 60, 1, 60, 2; 88, 1, 88, 2; 90, 2; 101, 21 Valley District, Army of the (C) 81, 6; 82, 7, 82, 9, 82, 10; 84, 9 Valley Station, Colo. Ter. 119,
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