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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 64 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 50 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 39 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 3 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 30 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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t deep, on a foot-log, which was springy; and as the men were slow, and some of the poor fellows got on their hands and knees to keep from falling, Confederate officers stood with stones in their hands to make them walk. Next day we reached Shelbyville, at night. The men's rations had given out the second day, and although it was known we were coming, our men had to stay in the court-house yard, it raining all night. They got nothing to eat until two o'clock next afternoon. Here let me say, God bless the ladies of Shelbyville! They are as good Union people as ever lived. They have been tried by fire and blood. They brought food, and words of good cheer and hope. How they do scorn those copperhead knaves of the North. The fourth day they marched us six miles, and again we slept in the open air, with a terrific rain storm raging all night. The next day beggars description. It rained all day. We crossed one stream, waist deep, by wading. Some of the men swam it. The road
cupied in cutting down the bridge and thoroughly burning the timber. We also burned the railroad ties and track for three miles below the bridge. The following day we destroyed a train and a quantity of stores at Christiana and Fosterville, and destroyed all the railroad bridges and tressels between Murfreesboroa and Wartrace, including all. the large bridges at and near the latter place, capturing the guards, &c. We also captured and destroyed a large amount of stores of all kinds at Shelbyville — the enemy running from his strong fortifications upon our approach. That night I ordered Davidson's division to encamp on Duck River, near Warner's Bridge; Martin's division two miles further down, and Wharton's two miles below Martin's. During the evening I learned that the enemy, who had been closely pursuing, had encamped near Frazier's farm. I immediately informed General Davidson of the position of the enemy, and directed him to keep the enemy observed, and to join me should th
n the morning of the twenty-eighth, I ordered out a strong reconnoissance, under command of Brigadier-General Willich, to learn whether the enemy had retired to Shelbyville or Murfreesboro. Pursuing seven miles down the Shelbyville road, it was found that the enemy had turned to the left, having taken a dirt road which led to the Shelbyville road, it was found that the enemy had turned to the left, having taken a dirt road which led to the Salem pike, thence to Murfreesboro. Leaving the Second brigade of Johnson's division at Triune, I marched on the twenty-ninth, with my command, on the Balle Jack road, toward Murfreesboro, the road being very bad, and the command did not reach Wilkinson's Cross-roads (five miles from Murfreesboro) until late in the evening. Me report of Major-General Crittenden. The enemy evacuated Murfreesboro on the night of the third. On the sixth I was ordered to move my camp to a point on the Shelbyville road, four miles south of Murfreesboro. The conduct of the officers and men under my command was good. The Louisville Legion, under the command of the gall