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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 64 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 50 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 39 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 3 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 30 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 2 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
the means of support necessary to an army. Shelbyville is the central point whence diverge all there not properly kept in repair—also connect Shelbyville with Manchester on the east, Winchester on échelon along the railway from Wartrace to Shelbyville: a line with intervals composed of a succesin and rests on the bank of Duck River near Shelbyville. Wheeler, the commander-in-chief of all th Wharton and Martin cover the approaches to Shelbyville on the Nashville and Murfreesborough roads,county roads which lead to the same town of Shelbyville, the one from Salem via Middleton, the othe make a feint to the right of Thomas on the Shelbyville road, and then draw near him to take the Lit line of defence a few miles in advance of Shelbyville. But notwithstanding the support received Then he sought in vain to meet Wheeler at Shelbyville. Once more distanced, he deems himself forumbia to relieve the garrisons at Wartrace, Shelbyville, and other posts, General Granger had been [12 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
s stroke is accomplished on the 5th by Martin, who captures the small garrison at Wartrace, and on the evening of the same day takes possession of the depots at Shelbyville. In another direction, Wheeler, after having destroyed the bridge and block-house on Stone's River, falls back on Duck River, close to which the bivouacs ofe moment when Crook, having been obliged to halt twenty-four hours to obtain supplies from the stores that had been thrown into confusion, starts on the road to Shelbyville. This delay, if it allows Wheeler time for some advance, enables Mitchell to collect his two brigades on the same evening about eight miles from Shelbyville. Shelbyville. Wheeler, not being able to attempt anything alone against the Federals, was in hopes of meeting Lee and Roddey on Duck River, and with their co-operation resuming the offensive against Mitchell. But nobody can give him any news of them; the enemy, who presses him, does not give him time to wait for Lee and Roddey, and he decides t