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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 36 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 167 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 120 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 79 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 68 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 58 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 53 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 51 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 5 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
the smallest tent, there were proofs of the greatest haste in leaving. Among other things found at Headquarters was a bundle of important official papers, one of them containing a drawing of Fort Pillow on the river below. The victory at Island Number10 produced the most profound sensation throughout the entire republic. Its importance to each party in the conflict could scarcely be estimated. The announcement of it went over the land simultaneously with that of the hard-won triumph at Shiloh on the Tennessee River, April 7, 1862. which we shall consider presently, and was followed, a few days afterward, by that of the capture of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River. Every loyal heart was filled with joy and Confederate Headquarters, Island number10. in this little picture is seen a representation of one of the plantation bells that Beauregard called for hope, and Government securities, which were at two and a half and three per cent. below par, immediately co
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. Grant and his victorious Army expedo Corinth, 284. visit to the battle field of Shiloh journey from Corinth to the field, 285. a night on Shiloh battle field, 286. a victim of the wicked rebellion effects of shot and shell on thseparate routes, in a heavy rain-storm, toward Shiloh, as the region around Shiloh Meeting-house was a copy of the dispatch, dated Battle-field of Shiloh, April 6, 1862: We have this morning attacked ition of the National troops in the battles of Shiloh. the general position of the Confederates mby humanity. Most of the prisoners taken at Shiloh were sent to Camp Douglass at Chicago. They wg. The writer visited the battle-field of Shiloh late in April, 1866. At seven o'clock in the erments strewing the ground. Our hostess at Shiloh Our hostess was a widow, with six childreshell went Our lodging-place on the field of Shiloh. through her house, and several trees standin
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
two armies near Corinth, 288. the victory at Shiloh; and its fruits public rejoicings, 289. forw and vigorous pursuit of the Confederates from Shiloh would have resulted in their capture or dispere weakness thirty-six hours after he fled from Shiloh. The way seemed wide open Beauregard's Headqo fought with equal gallantry) on the field of Shiloh, while Beauregard, encouraged by this inactionat Pea Ridge, New Madrid, Island Number10, and Shiloh, and the proclamation from the Executive Depar hospital steamer on the Tennessee River. Shiloh hundreds of loved ones were buried, and the hos combined army on the 8th of May: Soldiers of Shiloh and Elkhorn : The Confederates, as we have wn encampments, on the ever-memorable field of Shiloh. Let the impending battle decide our fate, ane day this address was issued. He staggered at Shiloh and fell at Corinth. The fugitives were purerflowed; and, being soon called by Halleck to Shiloh, Foote was left to prosecute the work alone.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
e already observed; and before the Army of the Potomac had fairly inaugurated its campaign, in the spring of 1862, the active little army under Grant, and the forces of Buell and Pope, in connection with Foote's gun-boats and mortars, had captured Forts Henry and Donelson, Nashville and Columbus; had driven the Confederates out of Kentucky; had seized the Gibraltar of the Mississippi (Island Number10); and had penetrated to Northern Alabama, and fought the. great battles and won a victory at Shiloh. See Chapters VII., VIII., IX., and X. At that conference, McClellan expressed his unwillingness to develop his plans, always believing, he said, that in military matters the fewer persons knowing them the better. He would tell them if he was ordered to do so. The President then asked him if he counted upon any particular time; he did not ask what time that was, but had he in his own mind any particular time fixed when a movement could be commenced. The General replied he had. Then,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
same in height, and bears the following inscriptions: West side.--Hazen's brigade. To the memory of its soldiers who fell at Stone River, December 31st, 1862. their faces toward Heaven, their feet to the foe. South side.--the veterans of Shiloh have left a deathless heritage of fame upon the field of Stone River. Killed at Shiloh, April 7, 1862, Captain James Haughton, First Lieutenant and Adjutant T. Patton, and First Lieutenant Joseph Turner, Ninth Indiana Volunteers; First LieutenanShiloh, April 7, 1862, Captain James Haughton, First Lieutenant and Adjutant T. Patton, and First Lieutenant Joseph Turner, Ninth Indiana Volunteers; First Lieutenant Franklin E. Pancoast and Second Lieutenant Chauncey H. Talcott, Forty-First Ohio Volunteers; Second Lieutenant Anton Hund, Sixth Kentucky Volunteers. East side.--erected 1863, upon the ground where they fell, by their comrades, Forty-First infantry, Ohio Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel A. Wiley; Sixth infantry, Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel W. C. Whitaker; Ninth infantry, Indiana Volunteers, Colonel W. H. Black; one hundred and Tenth infantry, Illinois Volunteers, Colonel T. S. Casey; Cockeri