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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 2 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 1 1 Browse Search
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Ferry, and crossing over to the main land at day-light. Thence the line of march for Pocatallgo, via Garden's Corners, was instantly taken up, Col. Christ driving in the enemy's pickets three times before the latter point was reached. At Garden's Corners company E, under the command of Lieut. Lantz, was left, and Major Higginson, of the First Massachusetts cavalry, came up with a force of eighty men and horses. After a brief halt at this point, we again started for Pocotaligo, via the Sheldon road, and with the exception of occasionally driving in the enemy's pickets, which delayed our march to a considerable degree, we reached our destination without interruption. Here we were met by the enemy, about eight hundred strong, his force consisting, as near as we could judge, of six companies of mounted riflemen and four companies of infantry. Among the latter was a considerable number of colored men, who fought apparently with all the zeal of their masters. The enemy's position w
Ferry, and crossing over to the main land at day-light. Thence the line of march for Pocatallgo, via Garden's Corners, was instantly taken up, Col. Christ driving in the enemy's pickets three times before the latter point was reached. At Garden's Corners company E, under the command of Lieut. Lantz, was left, and Major Higginson, of the First Massachusetts cavalry, came up with a force of eighty men and horses. After a brief halt at this point, we again started for Pocotaligo, via the Sheldon road, and with the exception of occasionally driving in the enemy's pickets, which delayed our march to a considerable degree, we reached our destination without interruption. Here we were met by the enemy, about eight hundred strong, his force consisting, as near as we could judge, of six companies of mounted riflemen and four companies of infantry. Among the latter was a considerable number of colored men, who fought apparently with all the zeal of their masters. The enemy's position w
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company B. (search)
, 22, s; student. March 2, 1864. Deserted July 12, 1864, New Orleans, La. Wesley W. Dow, Lawrence, 21, s; clerk. Aug. 9, 1862. Died Aug. 11, 1863, near Port Hudson, La. John Doyle, Lawrence, 28, s; operative. Aug. 8, 1862. Killed in action, May 18, 1864. Yellow Bayou, La. Calvin, H, N. Edson, Lawrence, 36; teamster. Aug. 8, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Charles T. Emery, Great Falls, N. H. Cr. Boston, 25, s; clerk. March 30, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Joseph Emery. Sheldon, Vt. Cr. Waltham, 28, m; farmer. March 3, 1864. Deserted Aug. 1, 1864, from Hosp. D. C. Charles Fauguet, N. Y. Cr. Athol, 28, s; clerk, July 30, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Richard Farrel, Stoughton, 18, s; boot maker. Dec. 29, 1863. m. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Martin Fay, en. Roxbury, Cr. Springfield, 18, s; blacksmith. Nov. 10, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Martin Fellam, W. Rrookfield, s; laborer. Feb. 26, 1864. Wounded Sept. 19, 1865. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. James A. Fisher
e British, having intercepted a letter from Lincoln,—in which he charged Moultrie Chap. XIII.} 1779. not to give up the city nor suffer the people to despair, for he was hastening to their relief,—escaped an encounter by retreating to the islands. The Americans, for want of boats, could not prevent their embarkation, nor their establishing a post at Beaufort. The Carolina militia returned to their homes; Lincoln, left with but about eight hundred men, passed the great heats of summer at Sheldon. The invasion of South Carolina by the army of General Prevost proved nothing more than a raid through the richest plantations of the state. The British forced their way into almost every house in a wide extent of country; sparing in some measure those who professed loyalty to the king, they rifled all others of their money, rings, personal ornaments and plate, stripped houses of furniture and linen, and even broke open tombs in search of hidden treasure. Objects of value, not transpor