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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morrill, Justin Smith 1810- (search)
Morrill, Justin Smith 1810- Legislator; born in Strafford, Vt., April 14, 1810; received an academic education: engaged in mercantile business till 1848, then became interested in agriculture. He entered the national House of Representatives as a Republican in 1855, and served there till March 4, 1867, when he was transferred to the Senate, where he had the longest unbroken term in the history of that body. For this reason he became popularly known as the Father of the Senate. He opposed the admission of Kansas as a slave State in 1855; introduced the tariff bill known by his name in 1861; and was a member of the Senate committee on finance from 1867 till his death in Washington, D. C., Dec. 28, 1898. Justin Smith Morrill. Taking an active part in all the debates relating to the tariff and to coinage, his most notable speech was that in which he opposed the remonetization of silver (see below) on Jan. 28, 1878. The remonetization of silver. Mr. President,—The bill
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has a collection of upwards of one hundred works about Milton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons passing through that city. One of these was the Earl of Strafford's as follows:— Qui nimis notus omnibus ignotus moritur sibi, Tho. Wentworth, Anglus, 1612. Another was that of John Milton as follows:— —if Vertue feeble were Heaven it selfe would stoope to her. Coelum non animu muto du trans mare curro. Joannes Miltonius, Anglus. Junii 10, 1639. The date is supposed to have been written by another hand. This autograph of Milton is described in the Ramblings in the Elucidation of the Autographs of Milton, by Samuel Leigh Sotheby, p. 107, w<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has a collection of upwards of one hundred works about Milton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons passing through that city. One of these was the Earl of Strafford's as follows:— Qui nimis notus omnibus ignotus moritur sibi, Tho. Wentworth, Anglus, 1612. Another was that of John Milton as follows:— —if Vertue feeble were Heaven it selfe would stoope to her. Coelum non animu muto du trans mare curro. Joannes Miltonius, Anglus. Junii 10, 1639. The date is supposed to have been written by another hand. This autograph of Milton is described in the Ramblings in the Elucidation of the Autographs of Milton, by Samuel Leigh Sotheby, p. 107, w<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, A charge with Prince Rupert. (search)
fluence, slide into rather reprehensible practices. At a later period the evil worked its own cure among the Puritans, and the army of Cromwell was a moral triumph almost incredible; but at the time of which we write, the distinction was but lightly drawn. It would be easy to go further and show that among the leading Parliamentary statesmen there were gay and witty debauchees,--that Harry Marten deserved the epithet with which Cromwell saluted him,--that Pym succeeded to the regards of Strafford's bewitching mistress,--that Warwick was truly, as Clarendon describes him, a profuse and generous profligate, tolerated by the Puritans for the sake of his earldom and his bounty, at a time when bounty was convenient and peers were scarce. But it is hardly worth while further to illustrate the simple and intelligible fact, that there were faults on both sides. Neither war nor any other social phenomenon can divide infillibly the sheep from the goats, nor collect all the saints under one
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909, Report of the Committee on Necrology of the Somerville Historical Society. (search)
the time of his own death had belonged to the society for fifty-five years. Mr. Arnold married Lilla E. Poole, of Worcester, October 25, 1877, who survives him, without children. A friend says of Mr. Arnold: He was devoted to his home and thoughtful and kind to every one. He was suddenly stricken helpless while in the vigor of full health, but was cheerful and patient through all his long illness. He was loved and respected by all who knew him. Nathan Loveman Pennock was born in Strafford, Vt., June 10, 1814, and was the son of Peter and Phebe (Fellows) Pennock, of that town. He left school to learn the harness business, and followed this business during the greater part of his long life. As an avocation, he was an itinerant singing master. From 1838 to 1863 he resided in Randolph, Vt. In the latter year he came to Lexington, and in 1864 to Somerville, where he remained till his death. For twelve years Mr. Pennock held a responsible position in connection with the McLean A
31. South Carolina, 31. South Side Railroad, 10. Sparhawk, Samuel, 89. Spottsylvania, 2, 14. Sprague, Mary, 78. Sprague, Richard, 78. Springfield, Mass., 16. Squa Sachem, 88. Stanton, Edwin M., 9. State Normal School, First, 32. Stedman, John, 88. Stetson, Rev., Caleb, 32. Stetson, William, 78. Stevens, Leslie, 19. Stevens, Rachel Y., 35. Stickney, Hiram C., 19. Stickney, Ira, 30. Stone, John, 42. Story, Sarah, 68. Story, Sarah L. A., 68. Story, Solomon, 68. Strafford, Vt., 24. Struggles of the Nations, 38. Sucker Brook, 87. Sussex Court House, 6, 7. Sweetser, John 32. Swett, Joseph, 70. Tailor, John, 43. Tailor, Oliver, 43. Tapley, John, 43. Taunton, Mass., 9. Taylor, General, Richard, 52, 54. Taylor, Zachary, 52. Teasdale, George, 67. Teasdale, Mary, 67. Teasdale, William H., 67. Ten Hills Farm, 78. Thirty-ninth Massachusetts, 6, 8, 9, 10. Thomas, Edward, 80. Thomas, Private, 3. Thomas, William H., 19. Thompson, C., 33. Thompson,
re Chap XI.} 1640 difficult than ever. The haughty Strafford had advised violent counsels. There were those who refused to take the oath never to consent to alterations in the church of England Send for the chief leaders, wrote Strafford, Strafford's Letters, II. 409. April 10, 1640. and lay them by the heels; no other satisfaction is to be thought of. But Strafford was not without his enemies among the royalists. During the suspension of parliament, two parties in the cabinet had dispuis attendance. Chap XI.} Nov. 11. 1641 April 21. His arraignment, within eight days of the commencement of the session, marks the resolute spirit of the commons; his attainder was the sign of their ascendency. On the honor of a king, wrote Strafford's Letters, II. 416. Charles to the prisoner, you shall not be harmed in life, fortune, or honor; and the fourth day after the passage of the bill of attainder, as if to reveal his weakness, the king could send his adhesion to the commons, addin
h, II. 161. His administration, 163. Soto, Ferdinand de, I. 41. Sails for Florida, 42. In Georgia, 46. Alabama, 48. Discovers the Mississippi, 51. In Arkansas and Missouri, 52. Death, 56. Spain. Her love of adventure, I. 30. Discovers Florida, 32. In the Gulf of Mexico, 35. On the Mississippi, 51. Her missions, 60. Colonizes Florida, 66. Extent of her American possessions, 73. Invades South Carolina, III. 174. Her colonial system, III. 114. War of the succession, 206. Effect of the peace of Utrecht, 227. War with France, 353. Her relations with England, 400. Contests with English smugglers, 435. War with England, 437. Invades Georgia, 444. Spotswood, III. 455; II. 23, 30 Standish, Miles, I. 316. Stoughton, William, III. 83. Strafford's, Lord, attainder, II. 5. Stuarts, commercial policy, I. 218. Their restoration, II. 1. Misfortunes III. 1. Stuyvesant, III. 293, 300. Susquehannahs, war with, II. 215. Swiss on the Savannah, III. 417.