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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Blue Ridge (Virginia, United States) or search for Blue Ridge (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ushed before sunset of the 14th, and Harper's Ferry relieved by midnight at farthest. That, instead of this, McClellan should have advanced his main body on the road tending rather north of west, through Turner's Gap to Boonsborough and Hagerstown, rather than on roads leading to Crampton's Gap and to the Potomac, is unexplained and inexplicable. The South Mountain range of hills, which stretch north-eastwardly from the Potomac across Maryland, are a modified continuation of Virginia's Blue Ridge, as the less considerable Catoctin range, near Frederick, are an extension of the Bull Run range. Between them is the valley of Catoctin creek, some ten miles wide at the Potomac, but narrowing to a point at its head. Several roads cross both ranges; the best being the National Road from Baltimore through Frederick and Middletown (the chief village of the Catoctin Valley), to Hagerstown and Cumberland. Lee, having divided his army in order to swoop down on Harper's Ferry, was compelle
ilure-damaging not merely in the magnitude of our loss, but in its effect on the morale and efficiency of our chief army. It had extinguished the last hope of culling Lee north of the James, and of interposing that army between him and the Confederate capital. The failure to seize Petersburg when it would easily have fallen, and the repeated and costly failures to carry its defenses by assault, or even to flank them on the south — the luckless conclusion of Wilson's and Kautz's raid to Staunton river-Sheridan's failure to unite with Hunter in Lee's rear-Sturgis's disastrous defeat by Forrest near Guntown — Hunter's failure to carry Lynchburg, and eccentric line of retreat-Sherman's bloody repulse at Kenesaw, and the compelled slowness of his advance on Atlanta-Early's unresisted swoop down the Valley into Maryland, his defeat of Wallace at the Monocacy, and his unpunished demonstration against the defenses of Washington itself — the raids of his troopers up to the suburbs of Baltimor<